Business News, The Chronicle Herald, business article.#Business #article

business article

Business article

COMMENTARY: Save protected areas from mining

Business article

Lunenburg native wins Startup Canada’s Young Entrepreneur Award

Business article

Blueberry growers face price crisis

Business article

How Canada turned to Mexico to fend off TPP pressure from Japan, Australia

Business article

VIDEO: Canada’s decision to decline TPP agreement shouldn’t have been surprise: Trudeau

Business article

Asia-Pacific forum sticks to free-trade gospel despite Trump

Business article

US cities, states defy Trump, still back Paris climate deal

Newcap Radio buys two New Glasgow stations

BUSINESS BOOKSHELF: The Power of Trust

Business article

Weinstein’s Impact: List of men accused of sexual misconduct

Business article

Crocs, Dawgs decade-long legal battle over clogs moves to Canadian courts

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

Business article

Sherritt to transfer part ownership of Madagascar mine to settled debt woes

Business article

Cominar looking for Sears replacements after toiling to fill Target locations

Business article

Ottawa’s plan for excise tax on medical marijuana draws ire of patients, producers

Business article

Trudeau embrace of TPP could hurt tough NAFTA talks with Trump: experts

Business article

Alberta puts up $40M to help workers transition during coal-power phase-out

Business article





The Telegraph Festival of Business, business article.#Business #article

Festival of Business

Business article Business article

Business article Business article Business article Business article

The Telegraph Festival of Business 2017

The seventh Festival of Business will take place in London on Tuesday 7 November, 2017. This one day conference, regularly attracting an audience of 600 senior executives from UK businesses, will bring together some of the best-known names in British business, along with leading politicians and thought leaders, in a bid to ensure the continued growth of Britain’s small businesses. A combination of keynote addresses, live interviews, case studies, expert panels, quick-fire talks, and masterclasses will ensure attendees leave the conference having found inspiration, heard pioneering examples of business development and cemented valuable relationships with their peers.

Agenda

Registration and Breakfast

Welcome Address from the Chairman

Jeremy Warner, Associate Editor, The Telegraph

Lady Michelle Mone, Baroness of Mayfair OBE

Panel Session: Talent: attracting, recruiting and retaining your most valuable asset

Understand how important your company’s values are for recruitment and learn how to encourage millennials through to Gen X to join and then get them to stay. Gain insights into competing with larger companies when it comes to salary, culture and apprenticeships and delve further into the complexities of employment regulation.

Craig Donaldson, Chief Executive Officer, Metro Bank

Karen Blackett, OBE Chairwoman, MediaCom UK

Kiera Lawlor, Head of Happiness, Social Chain

Kirstin Furber, People Director, BBC Worldwide

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Panel Session: Leading your business to success

Hear first hand on how to lead through change and how to successfully delegate. Gain insights into day-to-day management tips and understand the key lessons learnt by overcoming failure.

James Daunt, Chief Executive Officer, Waterstones

Chris Morling, Founder and Managing Director, money.co.uk

Helena Morrissey, Head of Personal Investing, Legal General Investment Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

Networking and Refreshment Break

Quick-fire Talk: Cyber security – how to prevent the worst from happening

Senior Representative, National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)

Q A: Late Payments: can common ground be found?

A discussion that speaks to both sides, is honest about what the issues are at both ends and is constructive in terms of solutions.

Richard Gilkes, Managing Director, Stort Chemical

Philip King, Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Credit Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

The importance of growth and international trade for SMEs

The Rt Hon Dr. Liam Fox MP, Secretary of State for International Trade

Plotting the future of tech innovation in your business

The new tech landscape; identify fads vs genuinely useful future tech and investing wisely to make the best tech choices. Gain insights into the importance of company-wide adoption and understanding and recruiting the relevant talent to deal with changing tech and transformation.

Chief Digital Officer

Digital Marketing Lead, UK

Pfizer Innovative Health

Moderator: Robert Bridge

Chief Customer Officer

Scaling Up Your Business Operations

Gain insights and advice on whether it’s best to scale through partnerships or organically. Understand how to ensure optimal staffing when growing and how to know when to step back.

Head of Enterprise

Business Banking NatWest/RBS

Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive and Co-founder

Moderator: Matt Caines

Editor, Telegraph Connect

Supporting UK business to export and grow

Which will be the new frontiers? Identifying the changes to consider following Brexit and understand cross cultural business differences. Examine the steps to take when starting to export.

Emma Jones, Founder, Enterprise Nation

Joshua Stevens, Chief Executive Officer, One Retail Group

Dr Adam Marshall, Director General, British Chambers of Commerce

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Securing your business against cyber threats

Cyber security; an issue not to be taken lightly and potentially one of the the biggest threats facing SMEs today. Understand how to achieve a cyber security 101 strategy and the preventative measures you can take and what to do when disaster strikes.

Sam Nixon, Product Owner, Decoded

Phil Lander, Director of Mobile and IT, B2B, Samsung Europe

Rowan Davies, Head of Policy and Campaigns, Mumsnet

Moderator: Stephan Freeman, Chief Information Security Officer, The Telegraph





The Importance of Branding Your New Business, business article.#Business #article

Small Business

Early branding of a small or emerging company is key to business success. It is the quickest way for your company to express what it is and what it can offer. Inaccurate branding of a new business can make it difficult for people to grasp why the business exists in the first place.

Business article

Articles and resources from AllBusiness.com

AllBusiness.com is a business Web site that provides information and services to small businesses.

Tip: Clear Brand Positioning Makes a Good Picture

By AllBusiness.com

Working with a consultant to create a logo or other branding materials? Make sure you think through and communicate your company’s positioning and core values.

If you can’t articulate what differentiates your company or product to your branding consultant, chances are they won’t be able to communicate it visually either. They need clear direction from which to craft a memorable, differentiated brand.

For startups and small businesses, branding can often take a backseat to other considerations, such as funding and product development. This is a mistake, as a company’s brand can be key to its success. Dollar for dollar, it is as important and vital as any other early steps.

One software management company, temporarily named TallyUp, decided to invest in a branding overhaul. Its flagship product, a software suite that tracks and runs bonus incentive plans, needed a clear identity and platform to appeal to its target audience — primarily financial executives. The name TallyUp, while somewhat descriptive, didn’t capture the level of sophistication needed to attract the appropriate clientele. TallyUp hired a branding consultant, who recommended the name Callidus (Latin for “expert and skillful”) to effectively communicate its positioning in an instant. The new name communicated a similar concept but on a completely different level. Callidus positions the software product correctly.

A brand is a company’s face to the world. It is the company’s name, how that name is visually expressed through a logo, and how that name and logo are extended throughout an organization’s communications. A brand is also how the company is perceived by its customers — the associations and inherent value they place on your business.

A brand is a kind of promise. It is a set of fundamental principles as understood by anyone who comes into contact with a company. A brand is an organization’s reason for being and how that reason is expressed through its various communications media to its key audiences, including customers, shareholders, employees and analysts. A brand can also describe these same attributes for a company’s products, services, and initiatives.

Apple’s brand is a great example. The Apple logo is clean, elegant, and easily implemented. At a certain point in time the company began to use the apple logo monochromatically (as opposed to the rainbow stripes), signaling a new era for Apple. Smart branding allowed the company to clearly communicate a change in direction while continuing to build its reputation. Think about how you’ve seen the brand in advertising, trade shows, packaging, and product design. It’s distinctive and it all adds up to a particular promise: quality of design and ease of use.

Checklist: Branding Right

By AllBusiness.com

Branding means that you have created a consciousness, an image, an awareness of your business. Here are five ways to start achieving that:

— Think analytically. A brand should provide something that warrants attention on a consistent basis, something your audience wants and is not getting from your competitors.

— Maintain your brand. One rule of thumb is that when you start to become tired of your logo, tagline, and branding efforts, that’s most likely when they are sinking in with customers.

— Don’t try to appeal to everyone. Typically, the best you can do is to focus on the niche market for your product.

— Know who you really are. Know your strengths and weaknesses through honest analysis of what you do best.

— Fully commit to branding. Treat all functions of the company, from product development to sales, as integral aspects of your brand.





Business News, The Chronicle Herald, business article.#Business #article

business article

Business article

COMMENTARY: Save protected areas from mining

Business article

Lunenburg native wins Startup Canada’s Young Entrepreneur Award

Business article

Blueberry growers face price crisis

Business article

How Canada turned to Mexico to fend off TPP pressure from Japan, Australia

Business article

VIDEO: Canada’s decision to decline TPP agreement shouldn’t have been surprise: Trudeau

Business article

Asia-Pacific forum sticks to free-trade gospel despite Trump

Business article

US cities, states defy Trump, still back Paris climate deal

Newcap Radio buys two New Glasgow stations

BUSINESS BOOKSHELF: The Power of Trust

Business article

Weinstein’s Impact: List of men accused of sexual misconduct

Business article

Crocs, Dawgs decade-long legal battle over clogs moves to Canadian courts

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

Business article

Sherritt to transfer part ownership of Madagascar mine to settled debt woes

Business article

Cominar looking for Sears replacements after toiling to fill Target locations

Business article

Ottawa’s plan for excise tax on medical marijuana draws ire of patients, producers

Business article

Trudeau embrace of TPP could hurt tough NAFTA talks with Trump: experts

Business article

Alberta puts up $40M to help workers transition during coal-power phase-out

Business article





Business News From Australia – World, business article.#Business #article

FANGed: Why Murdoch may sell Fox

Business article

When Rupert Murdoch unofficially hung the for sale sign on his empire’s prized assets this week, it was confirmation that the mogul had been “FANGed”.

Business article

Western Australian power banker joins EY

It has been a busy week for former Macquarie Capital senior banker and and now Reserve Bank of Australia board member Mark Barnaba.

Business article

Saputo launches its charm offensive

Lino Saputo, Jr the boss of Canada’s dairy giant Saputo Inc says he does not see any potential issues with the competition regulator.

Business article

Low expectations about Canberra circus

The boss of Harvey Norman says shoppers already have such low opinions of politicians that the citizenship crisis hasn’t knocked confidence levels.

Business article

How Appleby’s Australian plan failed

Why the law firm at the centre of the Paradise Papers leaks abandoned an attempt to set up a Sydney beachhead.

Judge blasts ‘unethical’, ‘dishonest’ ANZ, NAB

  • James Frost

A judge has blasted ANZ and NAB for gross departures from basic standards of commercial decency, for which the banks will pay $50 million ea.

Double Irish schemes ‘unrealistic’, ATO warns

  • Neil Chenoweth

The Tax Office has hit out at “ineffective and unrealistic” schemes being promoted to US companies identified in the Paradise Papers to set .

Banks to launch mining-style ad campaign

  • James Eyers

A new “banks belong to you” campaign will remind Australians that 80pc of bank profits are returned to them via dividends.

Reynolds loses battle over unpaid settlement

  • Vesna Poljak
  • Patrick Commins

The NSW Supreme Court recorded a judgment against David Reynolds and Attis Capital in a dispute brought by Faye Mary Parker, the mother of f.

How ACCC’s NBN changes could really shake up telcos

  • Opinion
  • Peter Moon

The ACCC’s NBN push should shake up a tightly controlled sector where wholesalers withhold crucial data from smaller service providers.

Featured in Business

banking and finance

Business article





The Importance of Branding Your New Business, business article.#Business #article

Small Business

Early branding of a small or emerging company is key to business success. It is the quickest way for your company to express what it is and what it can offer. Inaccurate branding of a new business can make it difficult for people to grasp why the business exists in the first place.

Business article

Articles and resources from AllBusiness.com

AllBusiness.com is a business Web site that provides information and services to small businesses.

Tip: Clear Brand Positioning Makes a Good Picture

By AllBusiness.com

Working with a consultant to create a logo or other branding materials? Make sure you think through and communicate your company’s positioning and core values.

If you can’t articulate what differentiates your company or product to your branding consultant, chances are they won’t be able to communicate it visually either. They need clear direction from which to craft a memorable, differentiated brand.

For startups and small businesses, branding can often take a backseat to other considerations, such as funding and product development. This is a mistake, as a company’s brand can be key to its success. Dollar for dollar, it is as important and vital as any other early steps.

One software management company, temporarily named TallyUp, decided to invest in a branding overhaul. Its flagship product, a software suite that tracks and runs bonus incentive plans, needed a clear identity and platform to appeal to its target audience — primarily financial executives. The name TallyUp, while somewhat descriptive, didn’t capture the level of sophistication needed to attract the appropriate clientele. TallyUp hired a branding consultant, who recommended the name Callidus (Latin for “expert and skillful”) to effectively communicate its positioning in an instant. The new name communicated a similar concept but on a completely different level. Callidus positions the software product correctly.

A brand is a company’s face to the world. It is the company’s name, how that name is visually expressed through a logo, and how that name and logo are extended throughout an organization’s communications. A brand is also how the company is perceived by its customers — the associations and inherent value they place on your business.

A brand is a kind of promise. It is a set of fundamental principles as understood by anyone who comes into contact with a company. A brand is an organization’s reason for being and how that reason is expressed through its various communications media to its key audiences, including customers, shareholders, employees and analysts. A brand can also describe these same attributes for a company’s products, services, and initiatives.

Apple’s brand is a great example. The Apple logo is clean, elegant, and easily implemented. At a certain point in time the company began to use the apple logo monochromatically (as opposed to the rainbow stripes), signaling a new era for Apple. Smart branding allowed the company to clearly communicate a change in direction while continuing to build its reputation. Think about how you’ve seen the brand in advertising, trade shows, packaging, and product design. It’s distinctive and it all adds up to a particular promise: quality of design and ease of use.

Checklist: Branding Right

By AllBusiness.com

Branding means that you have created a consciousness, an image, an awareness of your business. Here are five ways to start achieving that:

— Think analytically. A brand should provide something that warrants attention on a consistent basis, something your audience wants and is not getting from your competitors.

— Maintain your brand. One rule of thumb is that when you start to become tired of your logo, tagline, and branding efforts, that’s most likely when they are sinking in with customers.

— Don’t try to appeal to everyone. Typically, the best you can do is to focus on the niche market for your product.

— Know who you really are. Know your strengths and weaknesses through honest analysis of what you do best.

— Fully commit to branding. Treat all functions of the company, from product development to sales, as integral aspects of your brand.





Prophet on demand #muhammad, #encyclopedia, #encyclopaedia, #britannica, #article


#

Muhammad

Muhammad, in full Abū al-Qāsim Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib ibn Hāshim (born c. 570. Mecca, Arabia [now in Saudi Arabia]—died June 8, 632. Medina), the founder of Islam and the proclaimer of the Qurʾān. Muhammad is traditionally said to have been born in 570 in Mecca and to have died in 632 in Medina. where he had been forced to emigrate to with his adherents in 622.

The Prophet’s Mosque, showing the green dome built above the tomb of Muhammad, Medina, Saudi Arabia.

Omar Chatriwala (CC-BY-2.0) (A Britannica Publishing Partner)

Biographical sources

Biography according to the Islamic tradition

Status in the Qurʾān and in post-Qurʾānic Islam

Western perceptions

More About This Topic

Additional Reading

External Links

Britannica Web sites

Articles from Britannica encyclopedias for elementary and high school students.

The prophet Muhammad was the founder of the religion of Islam. Followers of Islam, called Muslims, believe that Muhammad received messages from Allah (God). These messages were later collected into the Koran, the holy book of Islam.

(570?-632). “There is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is the Prophet of Allah.” This is the fundamental statement of faith in Islam, and it declares that Muhammad is the founder of one of the world’s major religions. He was also the founder of a state by his unification of Arabia. Within decades after his death his followers sent out armies that conquered the whole Middle East, North Africa, and Spain. This vast territory was unified, at least temporarily, in an Islamic empire (see Caliphate). Eventually the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire, too, fell to Islam (see Ottoman Empire). The religion Muhammad founded became one of the most potent cultural forces in the world, and it plays a decisive role in the politics of the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia. (See also Islam.)

Article Contributors

Article History


Call Center Articles #call #center #article, #call #center #articles, #call #center, #call


#

Call Center Articles

The call center industry is advancing at an exponential rate during the past few years and will continue to do so in the coming future as well.

Although considered as one of the best Call center outsourcing destinations in the world, the Indian call center industry is currently facing quite a few challenges as it tries to reinvent itself for the new global economy.

Is there a connection between a customer’s call center experience and customer satisfaction and loyalty?

Global organizations have always preferred outsourcing call center services to India, when compared to outsourcing to China, Philippines, Malaysia and other Asian countries.

We don’t keep ourselves well prepared for the future, as we believe that nothing bad will ever happen to us; while in reality, worst seems to come when we are most relaxed.

While deciding to outsource your call center, IT or ITES needs, you might be considering whether to select home-based agents, or dedicated agents.

Online tutoring has become a trend among students and working professionals alike. With the help of the Internet and some specific software, students are now experiencing a new way of studying that is fun yet effective.

Has the risks involved in outsourcing stopped your company from leveraging the benefits that outsourcing offers?

India is a preferred destination for offshore outsourcing of call center services. The country has a large pool of English-speaking graduates who form an educated, computer-savvy workforce that can be tapped by global firms.

Outsource2india, a pioneer in outsourcing is one of the world’s leading providers of offshore Spanish telemarketing call center services.

Know how O2I’s bilingual tutors can improve your overall cognitive development, and also open up a world of opportunities for you – be it for work, travel or your own self-progress.

Expanding business to an unfamiliar country is never easy, as one is never sure how the products will be received.

Today, India has become the outsourcing hub of the world. As more organizations understand the importance of focusing on their core competencies, they are turning to Indian offshore call center providers to manage their critical but non-core processes.

Get answers of all the questions you may have in mind regarding outsourcing call center services to India.

According to IDC, the worldwide market for outsourced technical support services will increase from $11.1 billion in 2003 to $16.9 billion in 2008, representing a CAGR of 8.8%.

In the competitive business environment of today, the importance of customer support is increasing. Consumers have several options to choose from in the market and other than price and quality, the post-sale technical support and service they receive is a key factor in attracting new customers and retaining existing ones.

A Technical support Center or IT Helpdesk is a system designed to help and support an end-user of a particular product, system or application.

Outsourcing inbound customer services to Outsource2india is a good option as the call center industry in the country is on an upward spiral.

Outsourcing non-core and IT services has become the business strategy for growth in the new millennium.

The key to customer retention is good customer service. Regardless of whichever industry one is a part of, customer care is of utmost importance.

Outsource2india offers strategic call center outsourcing services to leading global companies across various industry verticals.

Call centers in India providing inbound customer service are well equipped with highly qualified agents, good infrastructure, cutting edge technology, security solutions and much more.

A virtual call center is a call center where an organization’s virtual call center agents do not work from the organization’s building, but work from different geographical locations.

Today, call centers have become crucial support channels for almost every organization. Effective call center management can help you easily ask questions to customers, solve simple problems, collect information and perform routine transactions in a cost-effective manner.

During the late 90’s American companies began exploring the possibility of outsourcing their call center services and BPO services abroad This was done mainly to cut operating costs and increase efficiency.

Global investors consider India and Philippines as two of the most viable destinations for outsourcing call center services. Want to know which destination will be more suitable?

Is your organization looking to outsource customer support services but is not able to find a right call center outsourcing partner?

If you are interested in saving your valuable time and productive resources, then outsourcing your call center services is the best bet.

Email support has become crucial for any business. By outsourcing email support services to countries such as India, you can save on expenses as well as concentrate on the core functions of your business.

Please contact us with your call center outsourcing requirements.


Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article – Brilliant Advice™

#cincinnati business courier

#

Posts

Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article

EXCLUSIVE. Cincinnati money manager Cern Basher leaves firm he helped found to start new company.

Cern Basher has left the investment advisory firm he co-founded nearly 16 years ago to start a new one.

Basher left Madison Wealth Management in January, but he didn’t have much time off. Last week, he launched Brilliant Advice, a Kenwood-based investment advisory firm with a couple of twists on the typical formula.

Basher was one of six owners at Madison, which manages more than $400 million and is also located on Montgomery Road in Kenwood, when he decided to depart.

“I had some ideas and a vision of how I wanted to work with clients, and it didn’t really mesh with my partners,” Basher said. “So I made a decision to leave Madison.”

Among the things that make Basher’s firm different from most: It’s completely open about the fees it charges, it doesn’t negotiate fees and they’re significantly lower than what most firms charge.

“All wealth managers say they can negotiate fees,” Basher told me. “But the challenge as a client is it’s a bit like being on an airplane. You’re not sure how much the person sitting next to you paid, and you don’t want to be the one who paid the most. It just doesn’t seem fair to me. The fact we don’t negotiate is actually better for you as a client. You know that it’s fair and everyone is paying equal.

The homepage of Brilliant’s website has a prominent feature allowing potential clients to compare fees. It not only shows how much they’ll pay but how much they’ll save compared to a typical adviser.

Brilliant charges no more than 0.9 percent of assets. Most advisers charge 1 percent unless accounts have an enormous amount of assets. And Brilliant’s percentage rate drops as the account gets bigger. Basher also caps the fee at $50,000 a year, regardless of account size. Any account above $12.3 million is charged the same $50,000 annual fee.

Basher also will work closely with clients to develop a plan. That probably doesn’t sound different from most advisers, but he takes it to another level. He’ll actually develop a financial plan during a meeting with a client rather than gathering information and coming back later with a strategy.

“I want them to sit down with me as we do it,” Basher said. “With a typical plan, the client doesn’t know what you considered but didn’t use.”

He also uses technology to give clients constant access to their financial plan and current investment reports. There s no need for them to wait for a quarterly report.

In addition to investment management and financial planning, he’s offering what he calls lifestyle design. That’s a process that helps clients decide what’s most important to them and how they want to live after retirement. Then, Basher can tailor a financial plan to meet those lifestyle goals.

“We break it down into needs, wants and wishes,” he said. “Wishes tend to be the things people care the most about. Wouldn’t it be nice to make those wishes come true?”

About the company name: It’s not meant to tout that Basher’s advice is outstanding. He pointed out that brilliant means distinctive, excellent, and light and transparent. He’s striving for all of those.

Basher brought over two others from Madison: Holly Purcell. a portfolio manager, and Danya Karram. a financial planner.

He has a two-year non-solicitation agreement with Madison, so he can’t contact former clients to get them to move, but they can contact him and make that choice on their own.

“I’m sure former clients are interested, and we’ll also work with anyone else who’s interested,” Basher said.

Click here to read the full article about Cern Basher and Brilliant Advice in PDF format.

Below is a link to the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website:





JG-L NEWS ARCHIVES PAGE #adult #jolly #jumper, #ankle #cuffs, #article, #articles, #ballet


– NEWS ADVENTURES –

ARCHIVE ACCESS PAGE

I will generally do one update per month, and these will, for the most part, come with new pages from different sections of the site. These updates will normally be loaded between the 15th and 20th of the month. Occasionally, small addendums will be tacked onto the main update. You’ll find that I normally remember to hot-link to the appropriate new page(s).

Updates will continue to be in an A. B C. sequence, so that there will be four per year from each section .

BELOW, YOU WILL FIND A FULL, HOT-LINKED LIST OF ALL THE NEWS PAGES CREATED SINCE THIS SITE WENT ON LINE IN APRIL OF 2005 AND SO BY CLICKING ON THE MONTH, YOU WILL BE TAKEN TO THE LAST (OR ONLY) UP-DATE FOR THAT MONTH.

MONTHS IN RED INDICATE THAT THERE WERE NO UPLOADS FOR THAT MONTH

2013. January. February. March. April. May. June. July. August. September. October. November. December

2014. January. February. March. April. May. June. July. August. September. October. November. December

2017. January. February. March. April. May. June. July. August. September. October. November. December


Article Page #easy #business #loans

#daily stock market

#

The behavior of daily stock market trading volume ☆

  • Bipin B. Ajinkya
  • University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
  • Prem C. Jain
  • University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Available online 23 August 2002.

Abstract

This paper documents the empirical distributions of daily trading volume prediction errors for several commonly used volume measures and expectation models for individual firms and for portfolios. The prediction errors for raw volume measures are significantly positively skewed, with thin left tails and fat right tails. However, natural log transformations of the volume measures are approximately normally distributed. For longer than one-day prediction intervals, recognition of autocorrelation in daily trading volume is advantageous for detecting abnormal trading. Results of analysis for clustering of events and for different size firms are also presented.

This work has benefited from suggestions of Ray Ball (the editor), Mike Barclay (the referee), Linda Bamber, Bryan Church, Greg Clinch, Dan Elnathan, Gun-Ho Joh, Andy Lo, Craig Mackinlay, Jens Stephan, Rex Thompson, Senyo Tse, Jerry Warner, and workshop participants at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Texas A M University. This work was completed while the first author had a summer grant from the Fisher School of Accounting, University of Florida, and the second author was a Peat Marwick Research Fellow.

Copyright © 1989 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Citing articles ( )





Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article – Brilliant Advice™

#cincinnati business courier

#

Posts

Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article

EXCLUSIVE. Cincinnati money manager Cern Basher leaves firm he helped found to start new company.

Cern Basher has left the investment advisory firm he co-founded nearly 16 years ago to start a new one.

Basher left Madison Wealth Management in January, but he didn’t have much time off. Last week, he launched Brilliant Advice, a Kenwood-based investment advisory firm with a couple of twists on the typical formula.

Basher was one of six owners at Madison, which manages more than $400 million and is also located on Montgomery Road in Kenwood, when he decided to depart.

“I had some ideas and a vision of how I wanted to work with clients, and it didn’t really mesh with my partners,” Basher said. “So I made a decision to leave Madison.”

Among the things that make Basher’s firm different from most: It’s completely open about the fees it charges, it doesn’t negotiate fees and they’re significantly lower than what most firms charge.

“All wealth managers say they can negotiate fees,” Basher told me. “But the challenge as a client is it’s a bit like being on an airplane. You’re not sure how much the person sitting next to you paid, and you don’t want to be the one who paid the most. It just doesn’t seem fair to me. The fact we don’t negotiate is actually better for you as a client. You know that it’s fair and everyone is paying equal.

The homepage of Brilliant’s website has a prominent feature allowing potential clients to compare fees. It not only shows how much they’ll pay but how much they’ll save compared to a typical adviser.

Brilliant charges no more than 0.9 percent of assets. Most advisers charge 1 percent unless accounts have an enormous amount of assets. And Brilliant’s percentage rate drops as the account gets bigger. Basher also caps the fee at $50,000 a year, regardless of account size. Any account above $12.3 million is charged the same $50,000 annual fee.

Basher also will work closely with clients to develop a plan. That probably doesn’t sound different from most advisers, but he takes it to another level. He’ll actually develop a financial plan during a meeting with a client rather than gathering information and coming back later with a strategy.

“I want them to sit down with me as we do it,” Basher said. “With a typical plan, the client doesn’t know what you considered but didn’t use.”

He also uses technology to give clients constant access to their financial plan and current investment reports. There s no need for them to wait for a quarterly report.

In addition to investment management and financial planning, he’s offering what he calls lifestyle design. That’s a process that helps clients decide what’s most important to them and how they want to live after retirement. Then, Basher can tailor a financial plan to meet those lifestyle goals.

“We break it down into needs, wants and wishes,” he said. “Wishes tend to be the things people care the most about. Wouldn’t it be nice to make those wishes come true?”

About the company name: It’s not meant to tout that Basher’s advice is outstanding. He pointed out that brilliant means distinctive, excellent, and light and transparent. He’s striving for all of those.

Basher brought over two others from Madison: Holly Purcell. a portfolio manager, and Danya Karram. a financial planner.

He has a two-year non-solicitation agreement with Madison, so he can’t contact former clients to get them to move, but they can contact him and make that choice on their own.

“I’m sure former clients are interested, and we’ll also work with anyone else who’s interested,” Basher said.

Click here to read the full article about Cern Basher and Brilliant Advice in PDF format.

Below is a link to the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website:





Hydrogen bonding #hydrogen #bonding, #encyclopedia, #encyclopaedia, #britannica, #article


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Hydrogen bonding

hydrogen bonding, interaction involving a hydrogen atom located between a pair of other atoms having a high affinity for electrons ; such a bond is weaker than an ionic bond or covalent bond but stronger than van der Waals forces. Hydrogen bonds can exist between atoms in different molecules or in parts of the same molecule. One atom of the pair (the donor), generally a fluorine. nitrogen. or oxygen atom, is covalently bonded to a hydrogen atom (−FH, −NH, or −OH), whose electrons it shares unequally; its high electron affinity causes the hydrogen to take on a slight positive charge. The other atom of the pair, also typically F, N, or O, has an unshared electron pair, which gives it a slight negative charge. Mainly through electrostatic attraction, the donor atom effectively shares its hydrogen with the acceptor atom, forming a bond. Because of its extensive hydrogen bonding, water (H2 O) is liquid over a far greater range of temperatures that would be expected for a molecule of its size. Water is also a good solvent for ionic compounds and many others because it readily forms hydrogen bonds with the solute. Hydrogen bonding between amino acids in a linear protein molecule determines the way it folds up into its functional configuration. Hydrogen bonds between nitrogenous bases in nucleotides on the two strands of DNA ( guanine pairs with cytosine. adenine with thymine ) give rise to the double-helix structure that is crucial to the transmission of genetic information.

The linking of atoms in two peptide links by the hydrogen bonds they can form. The links may be …

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Article Page #business #finance #loan

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The behavior of daily stock market trading volume ☆

  • Bipin B. Ajinkya
  • University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
  • Prem C. Jain
  • University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Available online 23 August 2002.

Abstract

This paper documents the empirical distributions of daily trading volume prediction errors for several commonly used volume measures and expectation models for individual firms and for portfolios. The prediction errors for raw volume measures are significantly positively skewed, with thin left tails and fat right tails. However, natural log transformations of the volume measures are approximately normally distributed. For longer than one-day prediction intervals, recognition of autocorrelation in daily trading volume is advantageous for detecting abnormal trading. Results of analysis for clustering of events and for different size firms are also presented.

This work has benefited from suggestions of Ray Ball (the editor), Mike Barclay (the referee), Linda Bamber, Bryan Church, Greg Clinch, Dan Elnathan, Gun-Ho Joh, Andy Lo, Craig Mackinlay, Jens Stephan, Rex Thompson, Senyo Tse, Jerry Warner, and workshop participants at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Texas A M University. This work was completed while the first author had a summer grant from the Fisher School of Accounting, University of Florida, and the second author was a Peat Marwick Research Fellow.

Copyright © 1989 Published by Elsevier B.V.

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Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article – Brilliant Advice™

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Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article

EXCLUSIVE. Cincinnati money manager Cern Basher leaves firm he helped found to start new company.

Cern Basher has left the investment advisory firm he co-founded nearly 16 years ago to start a new one.

Basher left Madison Wealth Management in January, but he didn’t have much time off. Last week, he launched Brilliant Advice, a Kenwood-based investment advisory firm with a couple of twists on the typical formula.

Basher was one of six owners at Madison, which manages more than $400 million and is also located on Montgomery Road in Kenwood, when he decided to depart.

“I had some ideas and a vision of how I wanted to work with clients, and it didn’t really mesh with my partners,” Basher said. “So I made a decision to leave Madison.”

Among the things that make Basher’s firm different from most: It’s completely open about the fees it charges, it doesn’t negotiate fees and they’re significantly lower than what most firms charge.

“All wealth managers say they can negotiate fees,” Basher told me. “But the challenge as a client is it’s a bit like being on an airplane. You’re not sure how much the person sitting next to you paid, and you don’t want to be the one who paid the most. It just doesn’t seem fair to me. The fact we don’t negotiate is actually better for you as a client. You know that it’s fair and everyone is paying equal.

The homepage of Brilliant’s website has a prominent feature allowing potential clients to compare fees. It not only shows how much they’ll pay but how much they’ll save compared to a typical adviser.

Brilliant charges no more than 0.9 percent of assets. Most advisers charge 1 percent unless accounts have an enormous amount of assets. And Brilliant’s percentage rate drops as the account gets bigger. Basher also caps the fee at $50,000 a year, regardless of account size. Any account above $12.3 million is charged the same $50,000 annual fee.

Basher also will work closely with clients to develop a plan. That probably doesn’t sound different from most advisers, but he takes it to another level. He’ll actually develop a financial plan during a meeting with a client rather than gathering information and coming back later with a strategy.

“I want them to sit down with me as we do it,” Basher said. “With a typical plan, the client doesn’t know what you considered but didn’t use.”

He also uses technology to give clients constant access to their financial plan and current investment reports. There s no need for them to wait for a quarterly report.

In addition to investment management and financial planning, he’s offering what he calls lifestyle design. That’s a process that helps clients decide what’s most important to them and how they want to live after retirement. Then, Basher can tailor a financial plan to meet those lifestyle goals.

“We break it down into needs, wants and wishes,” he said. “Wishes tend to be the things people care the most about. Wouldn’t it be nice to make those wishes come true?”

About the company name: It’s not meant to tout that Basher’s advice is outstanding. He pointed out that brilliant means distinctive, excellent, and light and transparent. He’s striving for all of those.

Basher brought over two others from Madison: Holly Purcell. a portfolio manager, and Danya Karram. a financial planner.

He has a two-year non-solicitation agreement with Madison, so he can’t contact former clients to get them to move, but they can contact him and make that choice on their own.

“I’m sure former clients are interested, and we’ll also work with anyone else who’s interested,” Basher said.

Click here to read the full article about Cern Basher and Brilliant Advice in PDF format.

Below is a link to the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website: