Synovial Fluid Analysis #synovial #fluid #analysis, # #2006 #21st #abnormal #abnormally #activities


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Synovial Fluid Analysis

Synovial fluid analysis is a group of tests that examine joint (synovial) fluid. The tests help diagnose and treat joint-related problems.

Alternative Names

Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration

How the test is performed

A sample of synovial fluid is needed for this test. Synovial fluid is normally a thick, straw-colored liquid found in small amounts in joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths.

After the area is cleaned, the health care provider will insert a sterile needle through the skin and into the joint space. Once in the joint, fluid is drawn through the needle into a sterile syringe.

The fluid sample is sent to the laboratory. The laboratory technician will check the sample’s color and clarity, and then place it under a microscope to check it for red and white blood cells, crystals (in the case of gout), and bacteria. In addition, there may be a chemical analysis, and if infection is a concern, a sample will be cultured to see if any bacteria grow.

How to prepare for the test

Normally, no special preparation is necessary, but contact your health care provider before the test to make sure. Tell your doctor if you are taking blood thinners, as they can affect test results.

How the test will feel

Occasionally, the health care provider will first inject local anesthesia with a small needle, which will sting. The aspiration is done with a larger needle and may also cause some pain. The procedure usually lasts less than one minute.

Why the test is performed

The test can help diagnose the cause of pain or swelling in joints. Removing the fluid can also help relieve joint pain.

This test may be used to diagnose:

  • Gout
  • Infection
  • Other inflammatory joint conditions
  • Joint injury
  • Osteoarthritis

What abnormal results mean

Abnormal joint fluid may look cloudy or abnormally thick.

Blood in the joint fluid may be a sign of injury inside the joint or a body-wide bleeding problem. An excess amount of normal synovial fluid can also be a sign of osteoarthritis.

What the risks are

  • Infection of the joint — unusual but more common with repeated aspirations
  • Bleeding into the joint space

Special considerations

Ice or cold packs may be applied to the joint for 24 to 36 hours after the test to reduce the swelling and joint pain. Depending on the exact problem, you can probably resume your normal activities after the procedure. Talk to your health care provider to determine what activity is most appropriate for you.

References

Knight JA, Kjeldsberg CR. Cerebrospinal, synovial, and serous body fluids. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry’s Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 21st ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2006:chap 28.

Review Date: 7/10/2009

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2010 A.D.A.M. Inc. as modified by University of California San Francisco. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Information developed by A.D.A.M. Inc. regarding tests and test results may not directly correspond with information provided by UCSF Medical Center. Please discuss with your doctor any questions or concerns you may have.

Getting Care


ScienceDaily: Your source for the latest research news #agriculture, #animals, #anthropology, #astronomy,


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June 30, 2017 For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a surprising effect of microglia, the scavenger cells of the brain: If these cells lack the TDP-43 protein, they not only remove Alzheimer’s plaques, but also synapses. This removal of synapses by these cells presumably lead to neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative. read more

July 1, 2017 Ten years after cigarettes were banished from all UK pubs, clubs, bars and restaurants, new figures reveal there are 1.9 million fewer smokers in Britain compared to when the smoking ban was introduced in 2007, with smoking rates now the lowest ever. read more

June 30, 2017 “Sport is too much like hard work.” For many, that is reason enough to pass when it comes to exercise. But does sport really have to make you break into a sweat? Psychologists have discovered that one’s own expectations have a major influence on just how strenuous one perceives a unit of sport to. read more

June 26, 2017 People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate safely through the environment. read more

June 29, 2017 Measuring a set of proteins in the blood may enable earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a. read more

June 28, 2017 In the future, it may be possible to diagnose cancer much earlier using improved detection systems. Computing resources are helping researchers explore improved breast tissue mapping, nanopore and lab-on-a-chip biosensors, and cell-entering cancer detectors. Advanced computing is critical for the simulation and materials design aspects of these emerging diagnostic. read more

June 29, 2017 A collaboration between biologists and materials scientists is yielding new insights into the wings of the “skipper butterfly” in the Costa Rican rainforest. What they learn could lead to technological advancements in systems ranging from power-efficient computer displays to sensors to energy. read more

June 29, 2017 Passengers have more chance of winning the National Lottery jackpot than being allocated middle seats at random on a Ryanair flight, according to a new. read more

June 29, 2017 Researchers have discovered a new topological material which may enable fault-tolerant quantum. read more

June 30, 2017 Researchers have further uncovered the secrets of telomeres, the caps that protect the ends of our chromosomes. They discovered that an RNA molecule called TERRA helps to ensure that very short (or broken) telomeres get fixed again. The work provides new insights into cellular processes that regulate cell senescence and survival in aging and. read more

June 29, 2017 The ongoing transition from nomadic cultures to settled lifestyles and intensifying agriculture has led to a steep drop not only in the use of fire on local lands, but in the prevalence of fire worldwide. read more

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June 29, 2017 The South Caucasus — home to the countries of Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan — geographically links Europe and the Near East. The area has served for millennia as a major crossroads for human migration, with strong archaeological evidence for big cultural shifts over time. And yet, surprisingly, ancient mitochondrial DNA evidence finds no. read more

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– NEWS ADVENTURES –

ARCHIVE ACCESS PAGE

I will generally do one update per month, and these will, for the most part, come with new pages from different sections of the site. These updates will normally be loaded between the 15th and 20th of the month. Occasionally, small addendums will be tacked onto the main update. You’ll find that I normally remember to hot-link to the appropriate new page(s).

Updates will continue to be in an A. B C. sequence, so that there will be four per year from each section .

BELOW, YOU WILL FIND A FULL, HOT-LINKED LIST OF ALL THE NEWS PAGES CREATED SINCE THIS SITE WENT ON LINE IN APRIL OF 2005 AND SO BY CLICKING ON THE MONTH, YOU WILL BE TAKEN TO THE LAST (OR ONLY) UP-DATE FOR THAT MONTH.

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Cell Structure #chem4kids, #biology4kids, #biology, #rader, #cells, #cell #structure, #nucleus, #mitochondria, #endoplasmic


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Cells are the Starting Point

All living organisms on Earth are divided into cells. The main concept of cell theory is that cells are the basic structural unit for all organisms. Cells are small compartments that hold the biological equipment necessary to keep an organism alive and successful. Living things may be single-celled or they may be very complex such as a human being.

There are smaller pieces that make up cells such as macromolecules and organelles. A protein is an example of a macromolecule while a mitochondrion is an example of an organelle. Cells can also connect to form larger structures. They might group together to form the tissues of the stomach and eventually the entire digestive system. However, in the same way that atoms are the basic unit when you study matter, cells are the basic unit for biology and organisms.

In larger organisms, the main purpose of a cell is to organize. Cells hold a variety of pieces and each cell type has a different purpose. By dividing responsibilities among different groups of cells, it is easier for an organism to survive and grow.

If you were only made of one cell, you would be very limited. You don’t find single cells that are as large as a cow. Cells have problems functioning when they get too big. Also, if you were only one cell you couldn’t have a nervous system. no muscles for movement, and using the internet would be out of the question. The trillions of cells in your body make your way of life possible.

One Name, Many Types

There are many types of cells. In biology class, you will usually work with plant-like cells and animal-like cells. We say “animal-like” because an animal type of cell could be anything from a tiny microorganism to a nerve cell in your brain. Biology classes often take out a microscope and look at single-celled microbes from pond water. You might see hydra, amoebas, or euglena.

Plant cells are easier to identify because they have a protective structure called a cell wall made of cellulose. Plants have the wall; animals do not. Plants also have organelles such as the green chloroplast or large, water-filled vacuoles. Chloroplasts are the key structure in the process of photosynthesis.

Cells are unique to each type of organism. If you look at very simple organisms, you will discover cells that have no defined nucleus (prokaryotes ) and other cells that have hundreds of nuclei (multinucleated ).

Humans have hundreds of different cell types. You have red blood cells that are used to carry oxygen (O2 ) through the body and other cells specific to your heart muscle. Even though cells can be very different, they are basically compartments surrounded by some type of membrane.

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    Mesothelioma news #statistics, #statistical, #data, #diseases, #mesothelioma, #inhaled, #asbestos #fibres, #risk, #cancer,


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    Mesothelioma

    Mesothelioma is a form of cancer that takes many years to develop following the inhalation of asbestos fibres, but is usually rapidly fatal following disease onset. Annual deaths in Britain increased steeply over the last 50 years, a consequence of mainly occupational asbestos exposures that occurred because of the widespread industrial use of asbestos during 1950-1980.

    The latest information shows:

    • There were 2,515 mesothelioma deaths in Great Britain in 2014, a similar number to the 2,556 deaths in 2013, and 2,549 deaths in 2012.
    • The latest projections suggest that there will continue to be around 2,500 deaths per year for the rest of this current decade before annual numbers begin to decline.
    • The continuing increase in annual mesothelioma deaths in recent years has been driven mainly by deaths among those aged 75 and above.
    • In 2014 there were 2,101 male deaths and 414 female deaths.
    • There were 2,130 new cases of mesothelioma assessed for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit (IIDB) in 2015 compared with 2,215 in 2014.
    • Men who worked in the building industry when asbestos was used extensively are now among those most at risk of mesothelioma.

    Mesothelioma in Great Britain: annual deaths, IIDB cases and projected future deaths to 2030.

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