Common Business Contracts #business #partner

#business contracts

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Common Business Contracts

While all valid contracts must include certain elements — particularly an offer, consideration, and acceptance — there are several different kinds of contracts addressing various business scenarios. Most small businesses will end up using the same kinds of contracts at various times, such as employment contracts or purchase orders, and will become quite familiar with these.

To get a sense of what contracts typically look like, you may want to check out our collection of real-life business contracts used by some well-known corporations. Some of the more common types of business contracts that you may enter into are included in the following list.

  • Bill of Sale – Transfers ownership of a good from one party to another
  • Agreement for the Sale of Goods – A contract for the sale, may be confirmed by a bill of sale after the transaction goes through
  • Purchase Order – First official offer made by a buyer to a seller
  • Warranty – Any conditions or actions that would void the contract
  • Limited Warranty – Warranty limited to just one or a few parts
  • Security Agreement – Contract between a lender and borrower of a loan
  • Employment Agreement A contract for employment, including details about payment, job responsibilities, etc.
  • Employee Noncompete Agreement – An agreement to not work for a direct competitor for a specified period of time after termination
  • Independent Contractor Agreement – Similar to an employment agreement, but outlines the terms to which the limited work contract applies
  • Consulting Agreement – Outline of the tasks and responsibilities (and compensation in return) for a consulting relationship
  • Distributor Agreement – Defines the relationship with a distributor
  • Sales Representative Agreement – Typically used to define the amount of commission, and how it’s tabulated, for a salesperson
  • Confidentiality Agreement – Agreement to not disclose certain information to third parties
  • Reciprocal Nondisclosure Agreement – Nondisclosure agreement in which both parties agree not to disclose certain trade secrets
  • Employment Separation Agreement – Also referred to as a termination agreement, this formally ends the employment relationship
  • Real Property Lease – A contract to lease office, manufacturing, or commercial real estate between the landlord and the business
  • Equipment Lease – Agreement to lease equipment for a specified period of time

General Business Contracts

  • Franchise Agreement – Outlines the relationship between the franchisor and the franchisee, such as support, advertising, use of brand, etc.
  • Advertising Agency Agreement – Establishes the scope of duties to be performed by the agency, duration, payment, etc.
  • Indemnity Agreement – An agreement to transfer risk from one party to another
  • Covenant Not to Sue – One party claiming damages agrees not to sue the responsible party
  • Settlement Agreement – Agreement between two parties to end a lawsuit in exchange for certain concessions (usually cash paid to the plaintiff)
  • Release – Typically refers to a release from liability (which are common for businesses where customers assume a reasonable risk of some sort)
  • Assignment of Contract – A legal transfer of the benefits and obligations of a contract from one party to another
  • Stock Purchase Agreement – Contractual agreement to sell a certain amount of stock to a name individual (often used for stock options at private companies)
  • Partnership Agreement – Official agreement among two or partners, including responsibilities of each
  • Joint Venture Agreement – Lays out the obligations, goals, and financial contributions of all parties involved in a joint venture
  • Agreement to Sell Business – Documents the terms of a business sale

Consider Talking to an Attorney Before Entering Into a Contract

Businesses and their senior managers typically draft and sign a staggering amount of contracts with customers, partners, investors, suppliers, and others with which they conduct business. Sometimes it’s as simple as a bill of sale, but other contracts can be quite complex. Before you agree to something with a high dollar amount, make sure you completely understand the terms. It’s often a good idea to meet with a business and commercial law attorney. who can break down the terms and help you make the best decision.

See FindLaw’s Contract Law and Drafting Contracts sections for more information.





Job Interview Guide, Interview Questions and Answers, Interview Tips, Mock Interviews #job


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Excellent site – great ideas – particularly for those ‘tricky’ questions and situations. This is an essential interview preparation tool! M.

I’m a vocational counselor and teach pre-employment skills. I’ve had people come back to me and say they almost knew what the employer was going to ask next, and that throughout their entire job search, they never encountered a question or situation they weren’t already prepared to handle.
Paul C. – Berlin, New Jersey

You have a wonderful source of information at your site. I am to say the least, impressed with the contents and information that you have presented. G. HR Director

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS
Interview Questions Answers

Be calm and confident for your interview. Interview experts Matt Nan DeLuca, answer tough interview questions – Tell me about yourself. Answer this common interview question in 3 easy steps.Review the answer.

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    Interview questions from the managers who hire. Interview question and answer tips for common interview questions, 41 job skills and abilities, interview situations, and career fields.

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    Interviewing for a supervisor’s job? Sample interview questions and answer tips.

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    Employer interview questions and ready to use interviews to hire the right person:

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    Proper Noun vs Common Noun #difference #between #proper #noun #and #common #noun,difference


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    Difference Between Proper Noun and Common Noun

    As a student of English language, people have to contend with the concepts of proper noun and common noun that are very confusing because of their similarities. Noun is a part of speech, and both common and proper nouns make up this part of speech. Noun, in fact, allows people to place a lot of words in a single category as it lumps together all places, things, persons and ideas. Let us differentiate between proper and common nouns, to make things easier for the students of English language.

    What is a Proper Noun?

    Proper noun is the name of place, person or thing that is unique and distinct as opposed to many of that kind. So London or New York may be cities, but they are unique and thus labeled as proper nouns. Thus, a planet may be a common noun, but when we talk about Uranus or Mars, we write in capitalized form and call them proper nouns. If we are talking about a girl, we are making use of noun for the girl, but as soon as we refer to Britney Spears, Britney Spears becomes a proper noun as she is a unique entity. Thus, an ocean is a noun as there are many oceans in the world, but when we talk about Pacific Ocean, we know we are dealing with a proper noun and not a common noun. As there are many zoos in the world, a zoo is a common noun but as soon as we refer to the Central Park Zoo, we know it is a proper noun as there is only one Central Park Zoo in the world. It means that all the words in a proper noun are written in capitalized form.

    What is a Common noun?

    Common nouns are the most basic categories of nouns where people, places and things are labeled as common nouns. Common nouns are written without writing the first letter of the word in capital form. So a man is a common noun but Vladimir Putin is a proper noun even though he happens to be a man. This means that common nouns are generic in nature and lump together a class of things. So all mountains are common nouns, but Mount Everest is a proper noun as it points to a specific mountain. If I have a dog as a pet, it remains a common noun but as soon as I refer to it with its name that is Bruno, I am making use of a proper noun for the more generic common noun of dog. Common nouns never start with a capital letter unless they occur at the start of a sentence.

    What is the difference between a Proper Noun and Common Noun?

    • Nouns are classified into common and proper nouns.

    • Common nouns are generic and club together a category of things or places such as dog, city, mountain, ocean etc.

    • Common nouns are never started with a capital letter unless they occur at the start of a sentence.

    • Proper nouns are specific in nature and tell us about a unique person, place, or thing. Thus, a mountain is a common noun but Mount Everest becomes a proper noun.

    • All words in a proper noun are started with capital letters.

    • Even though, a rose is a type of flower which is a common noun, it remains a common noun as there are millions of roses around the world.

    Related posts:


    Depression Medications: Common dosages, side effects and common treatments #common #depression #medication,


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    Some of the most commonly prescribed medicines in the United States.

    Prozac (chemical name: fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), Paxil (paroxetine), Celexa (citalopram), Lexapro (escitalopram) are among the most commonly prescribed depression medications.

    These drugs are frequently used to treat a number of problems in addition to depression, including anxiety and panic attacks. Prozac and Zoloft are available in generic form.

    Common daily dosage :
    Prozac, 20-60 mg.
    Zoloft, 50-200 mg.
    Paxil, 20-40 mg.
    Celexa, 20-60 mg.
    Lexapro, 10-20mg.

    Major side-effects include . Nausea, sleepiness, trouble falling asleep, headache. These all tend to fade away after a week or two. A decrease in interest in sex, difficulty in getting an erection or becoming aroused and difficulty having an ejaculation or orgasm can be more persistent side-effects for many people. There are potential remedies for these sexual side effects.

    Effexor (venlafaxine) is a depression medication that may be more effective for people with severe symptoms. It is also used to treat anxiety and social phobia. Extended release forms of the drug allow for less frequent dosing.

    Common daily dosage :
    Range from 150 mg to
    375 mg or more

    Major side-effect include . Insomnia, nervousness, nausea. These generally decrease over time. A small percentage of patients may experience sustained increases in blood pressure. This is more common in those taking doses over 225 mg per day. Effexor can cause the same sexual side effects as the depression medicines previously discussed.


    Remeron (mirtazapine)
    is a depression medication that is useful for patients with anxiety, insomnia and severe depression.

    Major side-effects include . This drug causes no gastrointestinal problems, sexual dysfunction, or insomnia over the long term. Sleepiness for the first few days can be a problem, however sleepiness may be less of a problem at higher doses. Increased appetite and weight gain are common.


    Wellbutrin (bupropion )
    is a depression medication that can be especially useful for depressed patients who feel fatigued and lethargic. It is also used to help people stop smoking (Zyban). Controlled-release forms are available, which decreases the number of times a day the drug has to be taken.

    Major side-effect include: Causes no weight gain and, for most people, does not cause sexual difficulties. It can produce nervousness and insomnia. It can increase the risk of seizures at higher doses. It should not be used by patients with eating disorders.


    Cymbalta (duloxetine)
    is the newest depression medication. It is supposed to be effective in treating both the emotional and the physical symptoms such as backache and muscle tenderness that often accompany depression .

    Common daily dosage :
    20-30 mg twice a day, although taking 60 mg once per day is okay.

    Major side effects include: The most common side effect is nausea, which usually goes away in a week or two. Other common side effects include: dry mouth, constipation, decreased appetite, fatigue, sleepiness, and increased sweating. Some people have an increase in blood pressure.


    Warning
    . Have you taken a depression medication and had any of the following reactions?

    • A sudden increase in energy, enthusiasm, decreased need for sleep, and the ability to get a lot done.
    • Improvement followed by repeated recurrence of depression after several dose increases or use of different depression medicines.
    • Increased irritability or explosive temper.
    • Depression that is not getting better in spite of having tried 3 or more depression medications.

    If you have had any of these reactions to depression medications, you may have bipolar depression a type of depression that should generally not be treated initially with antidepressant medication.

    Some concerns people have about using depression medication:

    Can depression medication cause someone to become suicidal?

    Children, adolescents and young adults who are depressed but also have symptoms such as extreme agitation, explosive temper, racing thoughts, or a decreased need for sleep can respond to standard depression medications with the development or worsening of their agitation and suicidal thinking. Many of these individuals have a bipolar type depression that was mistakenly diagnosed as simple depression. Roughly one-half of children with symptoms of depression may go on to develop bipolar disorder. Prescribers of medication need to be very cautious in administering depression medication to kids, teens and young adults. This is especially the case if the child, teen or young adult is angry and agitated or if there is a family history of bipolar illness.

    I want to learn to deal with my problems and its root causes on my own. Aren t depression medications just a crutch?

    Not at all. This concern is based on a couple of incorrect assumptions. The first one is that depression is due primarily to deep-seated problems that depression medications somehow just smooth over or cover up. The second one is that people can pull themselves out of depression if they have the guts or will-power to do so. It seems to me that many depressed people actually have more guts than the average person! If they didn t, they wouldn t be able to keep going the way they do. As to the first objection, there is no scientific evidence that depression is caused by deep-seated problems, so there really is nothing to cover-up. Depression medications do not interfere with or eliminate the need to learn new ways of thinking, behaving, or dealing with feelings in therapy. In fact, by relieving unnecessary psychic pain, they often make learning possible.

    Other concerns people have about using depression medications that are addressed inThe Depression Sourcebook, 2nd edition:

    – Will depression medication change my personality or make me not feel like myself?
    – How long do I have to take a depression medicine for?
    – Are depression medications addictive?
    – Are there natural alternatives to these drugs?
    – Can psychotherapy work as well as depression medicines?


    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and

    #investing in stocks

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    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and Their Differences Explained

    NEW YORK (TheStreet ) — When you step into the investing jungle, what will you find there? Lions (stocks) and tigers (bonds) and bears (cash), for sure. But they’re not as scary as you think.

    These three are the main investment classes, but the one we’ll be tracking exclusively in this guide is the king of the jungle: stocks.

    You may have heard stocks referred to as equities or securities. The reason they’re called equities is that you purchase an equity, or ownership, share of a company. Stock is also called a security for the same reason, because you’re securing a share of ownership in the company. That’s right; you’ll be a business owner just like you’ve always dreamed!

    But, as you know from everyday life, there are terrifically run businesses and there are businesses that make you say, “I’ll never go back there again!” How do you know the difference before you buy the stock? That’s what this guided tour will be teaching you.

    So when you buy stock, you become part owner of the company — maybe only a very small part, but still an owner. The size of the part you own, by the way, is irrelevant to your personal objectives.

    We won’t cover bonds in this guide, but it’s important for you to know that they’re out there in the investing jungle. When you buy a bond, you don’t become part owner of a company — you’re the bank! You lend the company, or others, money. When companies, counties, municipalities or the U.S. government need to raise money, but not raise taxes or prices, they have bond offerings.

    Bonds are loans, with a maturity date, and a percentage rate, promised to you, the Bank of I.O.U. The maturity date and set percentage rates can make bonds an attractive investment as part of a stabilizing influence in your investment portfolio. But you don’t want just bonds in your portfolio — over the long haul, stocks outperform bonds. If you want to purchase and own bonds, it’s very important to have quality bonds in your portfolio. If you want to continue to learn about bonds, see “Why Buy Bonds?”

    When financial advisers suggest you diversify, or vary your investments, they’re advising you to spread out any potential risk, or decline, in your investment portfolio. Your investment portfolio is a collection of all of your investments, which could include assets from each of these three classes.

    It’s like a nutritionist telling you to eat a little bit of each type of food to maximize your health. A balance of green vegetables, lean meats, dairy products and whole grain breads keep you physically and mentally healthy. Likewise, you want to invest your money in a variety of assets in your portfolio: stocks, bonds and cash products. Cash investments include products such as certificates of deposit (CDs) and money market mutual funds that keep you financially healthy.

    Ready then? Get out your compass.





    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and

    #investing in stocks

    #

    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and Their Differences Explained

    NEW YORK (TheStreet ) — When you step into the investing jungle, what will you find there? Lions (stocks) and tigers (bonds) and bears (cash), for sure. But they’re not as scary as you think.

    These three are the main investment classes, but the one we’ll be tracking exclusively in this guide is the king of the jungle: stocks.

    You may have heard stocks referred to as equities or securities. The reason they’re called equities is that you purchase an equity, or ownership, share of a company. Stock is also called a security for the same reason, because you’re securing a share of ownership in the company. That’s right; you’ll be a business owner just like you’ve always dreamed!

    But, as you know from everyday life, there are terrifically run businesses and there are businesses that make you say, “I’ll never go back there again!” How do you know the difference before you buy the stock? That’s what this guided tour will be teaching you.

    So when you buy stock, you become part owner of the company — maybe only a very small part, but still an owner. The size of the part you own, by the way, is irrelevant to your personal objectives.

    We won’t cover bonds in this guide, but it’s important for you to know that they’re out there in the investing jungle. When you buy a bond, you don’t become part owner of a company — you’re the bank! You lend the company, or others, money. When companies, counties, municipalities or the U.S. government need to raise money, but not raise taxes or prices, they have bond offerings.

    Bonds are loans, with a maturity date, and a percentage rate, promised to you, the Bank of I.O.U. The maturity date and set percentage rates can make bonds an attractive investment as part of a stabilizing influence in your investment portfolio. But you don’t want just bonds in your portfolio — over the long haul, stocks outperform bonds. If you want to purchase and own bonds, it’s very important to have quality bonds in your portfolio. If you want to continue to learn about bonds, see “Why Buy Bonds?”

    When financial advisers suggest you diversify, or vary your investments, they’re advising you to spread out any potential risk, or decline, in your investment portfolio. Your investment portfolio is a collection of all of your investments, which could include assets from each of these three classes.

    It’s like a nutritionist telling you to eat a little bit of each type of food to maximize your health. A balance of green vegetables, lean meats, dairy products and whole grain breads keep you physically and mentally healthy. Likewise, you want to invest your money in a variety of assets in your portfolio: stocks, bonds and cash products. Cash investments include products such as certificates of deposit (CDs) and money market mutual funds that keep you financially healthy.

    Ready then? Get out your compass.





    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and

    #investing in stocks

    #

    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and Their Differences Explained

    NEW YORK (TheStreet ) — When you step into the investing jungle, what will you find there? Lions (stocks) and tigers (bonds) and bears (cash), for sure. But they’re not as scary as you think.

    These three are the main investment classes, but the one we’ll be tracking exclusively in this guide is the king of the jungle: stocks.

    You may have heard stocks referred to as equities or securities. The reason they’re called equities is that you purchase an equity, or ownership, share of a company. Stock is also called a security for the same reason, because you’re securing a share of ownership in the company. That’s right; you’ll be a business owner just like you’ve always dreamed!

    But, as you know from everyday life, there are terrifically run businesses and there are businesses that make you say, “I’ll never go back there again!” How do you know the difference before you buy the stock? That’s what this guided tour will be teaching you.

    So when you buy stock, you become part owner of the company — maybe only a very small part, but still an owner. The size of the part you own, by the way, is irrelevant to your personal objectives.

    We won’t cover bonds in this guide, but it’s important for you to know that they’re out there in the investing jungle. When you buy a bond, you don’t become part owner of a company — you’re the bank! You lend the company, or others, money. When companies, counties, municipalities or the U.S. government need to raise money, but not raise taxes or prices, they have bond offerings.

    Bonds are loans, with a maturity date, and a percentage rate, promised to you, the Bank of I.O.U. The maturity date and set percentage rates can make bonds an attractive investment as part of a stabilizing influence in your investment portfolio. But you don’t want just bonds in your portfolio — over the long haul, stocks outperform bonds. If you want to purchase and own bonds, it’s very important to have quality bonds in your portfolio. If you want to continue to learn about bonds, see “Why Buy Bonds?”

    When financial advisers suggest you diversify, or vary your investments, they’re advising you to spread out any potential risk, or decline, in your investment portfolio. Your investment portfolio is a collection of all of your investments, which could include assets from each of these three classes.

    It’s like a nutritionist telling you to eat a little bit of each type of food to maximize your health. A balance of green vegetables, lean meats, dairy products and whole grain breads keep you physically and mentally healthy. Likewise, you want to invest your money in a variety of assets in your portfolio: stocks, bonds and cash products. Cash investments include products such as certificates of deposit (CDs) and money market mutual funds that keep you financially healthy.

    Ready then? Get out your compass.





    Common Business Contracts #business #reports

    #business contracts

    #

    Common Business Contracts

    While all valid contracts must include certain elements — particularly an offer, consideration, and acceptance — there are several different kinds of contracts addressing various business scenarios. Most small businesses will end up using the same kinds of contracts at various times, such as employment contracts or purchase orders, and will become quite familiar with these.

    To get a sense of what contracts typically look like, you may want to check out our collection of real-life business contracts used by some well-known corporations. Some of the more common types of business contracts that you may enter into are included in the following list.

    • Bill of Sale – Transfers ownership of a good from one party to another
    • Agreement for the Sale of Goods – A contract for the sale, may be confirmed by a bill of sale after the transaction goes through
    • Purchase Order – First official offer made by a buyer to a seller
    • Warranty – Any conditions or actions that would void the contract
    • Limited Warranty – Warranty limited to just one or a few parts
    • Security Agreement – Contract between a lender and borrower of a loan
    • Employment Agreement A contract for employment, including details about payment, job responsibilities, etc.
    • Employee Noncompete Agreement – An agreement to not work for a direct competitor for a specified period of time after termination
    • Independent Contractor Agreement – Similar to an employment agreement, but outlines the terms to which the limited work contract applies
    • Consulting Agreement – Outline of the tasks and responsibilities (and compensation in return) for a consulting relationship
    • Distributor Agreement – Defines the relationship with a distributor
    • Sales Representative Agreement – Typically used to define the amount of commission, and how it’s tabulated, for a salesperson
    • Confidentiality Agreement – Agreement to not disclose certain information to third parties
    • Reciprocal Nondisclosure Agreement – Nondisclosure agreement in which both parties agree not to disclose certain trade secrets
    • Employment Separation Agreement – Also referred to as a termination agreement, this formally ends the employment relationship
    • Real Property Lease – A contract to lease office, manufacturing, or commercial real estate between the landlord and the business
    • Equipment Lease – Agreement to lease equipment for a specified period of time

    General Business Contracts

    • Franchise Agreement – Outlines the relationship between the franchisor and the franchisee, such as support, advertising, use of brand, etc.
    • Advertising Agency Agreement – Establishes the scope of duties to be performed by the agency, duration, payment, etc.
    • Indemnity Agreement – An agreement to transfer risk from one party to another
    • Covenant Not to Sue – One party claiming damages agrees not to sue the responsible party
    • Settlement Agreement – Agreement between two parties to end a lawsuit in exchange for certain concessions (usually cash paid to the plaintiff)
    • Release – Typically refers to a release from liability (which are common for businesses where customers assume a reasonable risk of some sort)
    • Assignment of Contract – A legal transfer of the benefits and obligations of a contract from one party to another
    • Stock Purchase Agreement – Contractual agreement to sell a certain amount of stock to a name individual (often used for stock options at private companies)
    • Partnership Agreement – Official agreement among two or partners, including responsibilities of each
    • Joint Venture Agreement – Lays out the obligations, goals, and financial contributions of all parties involved in a joint venture
    • Agreement to Sell Business – Documents the terms of a business sale

    Consider Talking to an Attorney Before Entering Into a Contract

    Businesses and their senior managers typically draft and sign a staggering amount of contracts with customers, partners, investors, suppliers, and others with which they conduct business. Sometimes it’s as simple as a bill of sale, but other contracts can be quite complex. Before you agree to something with a high dollar amount, make sure you completely understand the terms. It’s often a good idea to meet with a business and commercial law attorney. who can break down the terms and help you make the best decision.

    See FindLaw’s Contract Law and Drafting Contracts sections for more information.