Business Continuity Planning Software, business continuity plan.#Business #continuity #plan

Business Continuity Plans

With Plan4Continuity, your business continuity plan is no longer a document gathering dust in a drawer but a live system

that contains plans, simulation schedules and audit logs of all activations as well as being a full management system of your

business continuity activities and communications.

The five most important elements of continuity planning are people, assets, services, locations and vendors or suppliers.

They all affect each other and together make up the cornerstone of the business continuity ecosystem.

Plan4Continuity brings these elements together in your business continuity plans.

Business continuity plan

Locations

Business continuity planning by location.

Your business may have different branches, regions, buildings, floors, departments ,even home offices and temporary remote sites. We call these entities “locations”. By dividing one’s business into locations one can manage business continuity more effectively.

Business continuity plan

People

People are a business s vital asset

People control and use assets, perform services and deal with vendors. They also make decisions, pay wages and liaise with clients. People, from plan managers to action owners, need to be involved in your continuity planning.

Business continuity plan

Services

Without services no business can function

Electricity, internet connectivity, IT support , telephony are your services, be they internal or external. Without these nothing would happen in a company. Disruptive event management needs to cater for alternative scenarios when these services are disrupted.

Business continuity plan

Vendors

Vendors need to be active participants

Vendors and suppliers of services are critical to the ongoing function of a business. They need to be active participants in your business continuity planning and form a vital link in the supply and disaster recovery chain.

Business continuity plan

Assets

A business needs assets to provide services

Knowing the assets that are critical to business operations is an important part of business continuity. Assets should therefore be included in business continuity plans, which can be simple service schedules or plans for when these assets services become disrupted.

Business continuity plan

Cloud technology

State-of-the art technology ensures encrypted data protection, redundancy and 24/7 availability even on remote devices.

Business continuity plan

Works on multiple devices

Works on multiple devices and platforms, allowing one to work remotely.

Software installation is not required.

Business continuity plan

Affordable

Pricing options are available from small business to enterprise level, and include many free features.

Business continuity plan

Simple to use

Intelligently designed and easy to use,

with no hardware infrastructure needed

Business continuity plan

Fast communication

Built as a reactive system that responds in a timely manner and is resilient, elastic and message driven.

Business continuity plan

Built on ISO 22301 standards

Built using the principles of the international IS0 22301 standard for business continuity.

Business continuity plan

Manage a live disruptive event quickly and efficiently

Plan4Continuity enables you to manage a live disruptive event efficiently across multiple locations and with several teams.

Business continuity plans can involve multiple threads of parallel actions and action owners.

Plan actions can be managed on mobile devices.

Plans can be altered and new actions created on the fly during a live event.

In a disaster or live disruptive event it is crucial to manage the event efficiently and to be up and running again as quickly as possible. Plan4Continuity enables you to:

  • Communicate to all active parties via email, chat, sms and voice messaging
  • Run multiple operations at once
  • Change plans and events as they unfold
  • Review simulations of activations right down to each communication and improve plans based on feedback

Business continuity plan

Build your Business Continuity plans with minimal effort

Build your plans using the latest innovative cloud technologies and access them from any internet connected device at any time.

Business continuity plan

Continuously control and improve your Business Continuity plans

Manage the setup of your disaster recovery plans and regularly simulate schedule and audit plans. Improve, test and meet compliance requrements.





Contingency Planning and Business Continuity Plan Development: Disaster Recovery Plans, business continuity.#Business

Business Continuity, Contingency Planning & Disaster Recovery

Business continuity

Business continuity

Template and Plan

Business continuity

Other Useful Links

Sample Business Continuity Plans

Business continuity management and contingency planning are of course essential and unavoidable tasks. However, the creation of a sound continuity and contingency plan is a complex undertaking, involving a number of stages and discrete activities.

For example, initially it is necessary to understand the underlying risks and the potential impacts of disaster. these are the building blocks upon which a sensible business continuity plan or disaster recovery plan should be built. Then the plan itself must be created. which of course is far from trivial. Then there are the maintenance and testing phases, to ensure that the plan remains current. Even having arranged all these matters there is audit to consider – and of course, there is the not so small matter of ISO27001!

Contingency Planning & Business Continuity World is designed to consider all these stages and to catalog some of the most highly acclaimed support products. Here you will find software to assist with business impact analysis and risk analysis. You will also find links to products to help you create and maintain the plan itself, as well as audit the plan and the arrangments in place to support it.

Whether you are entirely new to business continuity management, or whether you have a published and established contingency plan already in place, hopefully we can offer significant value.

The first step in a sensible business continuity planning process is to consider the potential impacts of each type of disaster or event. This is critical – how can you properly plan for a disaster if you have little idea of the likely impacts on your business/organization of the different scenarios?

Business continuityContingency Planning Template / Software

Creating the business continuity plan itself is far from a trivial undertaking. Every aspect of the plan must be carefully managed to ensure that it does not fall short when most needed. Fortunately, there are tools available to help. perhaps the most impressive being the BCP Generator. This is essentially an intelligent disaster recovery plan template and guide, greatly simplifying the entire plan creation exercise.

Having developed the business continuity plan, it is sensible to perform an audit. not just initially, but at regular intervals. This helps ensure that it remains current, and that it stands up to rigorous examination. Equally important are periodic checks on ‘business as usual’ contingency practices.

Having determined the impacts, it is now equally important to consider the magnitude of the risks which could result in these impacts. Again, this is a critical activity – it will determine which scenarios are most likely to occur and which should attract most attention during the planning process.

Service level agreements are an important part of business continuity management. This section explains their role and gives direction on SLA development. We also offer a section of general business continuity books and publications.

ISO 27001 requires appropriate business continuity and contingency planning. and compliance with this internationally recognized standard is growing in importance.

But how do you achieve this? How do you manage the compliance process? How do you know where you stand in relation to the demands of the standard?

We hope that this directory has been of substantial use. If not present within the site itself, the links provided should direct you to a suitable source. If, however, you need any further assistance, or have any comments on this portal, please contact us





Business Continuity Planning Software, business continuity plan.#Business #continuity #plan

Business Continuity Plans

With Plan4Continuity, your business continuity plan is no longer a document gathering dust in a drawer but a live system

that contains plans, simulation schedules and audit logs of all activations as well as being a full management system of your

business continuity activities and communications.

The five most important elements of continuity planning are people, assets, services, locations and vendors or suppliers.

They all affect each other and together make up the cornerstone of the business continuity ecosystem.

Plan4Continuity brings these elements together in your business continuity plans.

Business continuity plan

Locations

Business continuity planning by location.

Your business may have different branches, regions, buildings, floors, departments ,even home offices and temporary remote sites. We call these entities “locations”. By dividing one’s business into locations one can manage business continuity more effectively.

Business continuity plan

People

People are a business s vital asset

People control and use assets, perform services and deal with vendors. They also make decisions, pay wages and liaise with clients. People, from plan managers to action owners, need to be involved in your continuity planning.

Business continuity plan

Services

Without services no business can function

Electricity, internet connectivity, IT support , telephony are your services, be they internal or external. Without these nothing would happen in a company. Disruptive event management needs to cater for alternative scenarios when these services are disrupted.

Business continuity plan

Vendors

Vendors need to be active participants

Vendors and suppliers of services are critical to the ongoing function of a business. They need to be active participants in your business continuity planning and form a vital link in the supply and disaster recovery chain.

Business continuity plan

Assets

A business needs assets to provide services

Knowing the assets that are critical to business operations is an important part of business continuity. Assets should therefore be included in business continuity plans, which can be simple service schedules or plans for when these assets services become disrupted.

Business continuity plan

Cloud technology

State-of-the art technology ensures encrypted data protection, redundancy and 24/7 availability even on remote devices.

Business continuity plan

Works on multiple devices

Works on multiple devices and platforms, allowing one to work remotely.

Software installation is not required.

Business continuity plan

Affordable

Pricing options are available from small business to enterprise level, and include many free features.

Business continuity plan

Simple to use

Intelligently designed and easy to use,

with no hardware infrastructure needed

Business continuity plan

Fast communication

Built as a reactive system that responds in a timely manner and is resilient, elastic and message driven.

Business continuity plan

Built on ISO 22301 standards

Built using the principles of the international IS0 22301 standard for business continuity.

Business continuity plan

Manage a live disruptive event quickly and efficiently

Plan4Continuity enables you to manage a live disruptive event efficiently across multiple locations and with several teams.

Business continuity plans can involve multiple threads of parallel actions and action owners.

Plan actions can be managed on mobile devices.

Plans can be altered and new actions created on the fly during a live event.

In a disaster or live disruptive event it is crucial to manage the event efficiently and to be up and running again as quickly as possible. Plan4Continuity enables you to:

  • Communicate to all active parties via email, chat, sms and voice messaging
  • Run multiple operations at once
  • Change plans and events as they unfold
  • Review simulations of activations right down to each communication and improve plans based on feedback

Business continuity plan

Build your Business Continuity plans with minimal effort

Build your plans using the latest innovative cloud technologies and access them from any internet connected device at any time.

Business continuity plan

Continuously control and improve your Business Continuity plans

Manage the setup of your disaster recovery plans and regularly simulate schedule and audit plans. Improve, test and meet compliance requrements.





4 Ways to Create a Business Continuity Plan, business continuity plan.#Business #continuity

How to Create a Business Continuity Plan

BCPs provide procedures for how employers and employees will stay in touch and keep doing their jobs in the event of a disaster or emergency, such as a fire at the office. Unfortunately, many companies never take the time to develop such a plan, typically because they do not feel it is necessary. However, creating a comprehensive BCP will allow you to enhance your company’s ability to continue business as usual during or after significant disruptions to business operations.

Steps Edit

Method One of Four:

Understanding What Makes a Good Business Continuity Plan Edit

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Method Two of Four:

Determining Key Recovery Resources Edit

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Method Three of Four:

Creating Your Business Continuity Plan Edit

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan

Business continuity plan





Business Continuity Software, Business Continuity Consulting, BCP Software, business continuity.#Business #continuity

business continuity

Business continuity

Need a Plan Now?

Contact us to learn how our experts can help you build a plan quickly to satisfy regulatory and/or audit findings or satisfy vendor requests for a business continuity plan.

Business continuity

Business continuity

BCP Software

ContinuityPRO® is a user friendly and robust business continuity software tool that is used to create and maintain business continuity and disaster recovery plans.

Business continuity

Business continuity

Consulting Services

We offer professional business continuity consulting services by certified experts. We\’re here to help with all of your business continuity and disaster recovery requirements.

Business continuity

Business Continuity Planning

Is your business ready for an emergency? How will you serve your clients if a disaster strikes? Do you have a plan to keep your business operational?

Don’t let these questions keep you up at night! Continuity Innovations offers solid solutions to these problems. We’re a full-service business continuity consulting firm based in California, and our ultimate goal is to make your business resilient.

How do we do this? Continuity Innovations helps businesses of all industries develop and implement business continuity and disaster recovery plans. We know just how essential it is to have a business continuity plan in place in today’s fast-paced culture, and we’re here to make sure you have the tools to respond in time.

Continuity Innovations provides business continuity consulting and state-of-the-art business continuity software to meet your needs. These services include: Business Impact Analysis, Risk Assessment, Crisis Management, Pandemic Planning, Disaster Recovery, and more.

Are you ready to make your business prepared for whatever’s next? Let Continuity Innovations help you. We’ll keep it simple for you and your business. Call us today at 888-907-9902 to get started with our business continuity consulting services and business continuity software.





Business Continuity Planning in 4 Steps, Travelers Insurance, business continuity.#Business #continuity

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  • Business Continuity Planning in 4 Steps

Business continuity

Business Continuity Planning in 4 Steps

Business continuity

There are many reasons why your company needs a business continuity plan. Having a strategy before an event happens helps to maximize the chance your business can recover while minimizing the loss of property, life and assets.

Developing your business continuity plan should be a thoughtful process resulting in a plan that can be beneficial to you if an event occurs.

Start by assembling a team of key decision-makers who will lead your continuity planning efforts. Senior management, team leaders and anyone with in-depth knowledge about business operations should be included.

Business continuityBusiness continuity

Four Steps to Developing an Effective Business Continuity Plan

  1. Identify threats or risks

Understanding the risks that could leave employees, customers, vendors, property and operations vulnerable is fundamental. Threats can include, but are not limited to natural disasters, malicious attacks, power outages and system failures.

Business continuity





Business Continuity Planning Suite, business continuity.#Business #continuity

Business Continuity Planning Suite

If you need more help getting a business or organization prepared, please use the new Business Continuity Planning Suite (ZIP Archive – 13 Mb: PC Compatible) developed by DHS’ National Protection and Programs Directorate and FEMA.

This software was created for any business with the need to create, improve, or update its business continuity plan. The Suite is scalable for optimal use by organizations of any size and consists of a business continuity plan (BCP) training, automated BCP and disaster recovery plan (DRP) generators, and a self-directed exercise for testing an implemented BCP. Businesses can utilize this solution to maintain normal operations and provide resilience during a disruption.

Business Continuity Planning Suite

  1. Download and EXTRACT the Business Continuity Planning Suite (BCPS) (ZIP Archive – 13 Mb: PC Compatible)
  2. Once downloaded, EXTRACT the Business Continuity Planning Suite file and click “START_NOW.”
  3. Step-by-Step Instructions for BCPS Installation (PDF-1.2 Mb)

Learn about the Tools

The BCP training component of the Suite is a 30 minute video-based course, which examines the importance of BCP, provides an overview on BCP, and prepares users to write their own plans. It is broken into three segments:

  1. What is business continuity planning?
  2. Why is business continuity planning important?
  3. What is the business continuity planning process?

Upon completion of the training, users should possess a basic understanding of BCP, the process of completing a BCP, and the motivation to complete their own plan using the Suite’s BCP Generator.

The Suite’s BCP and DRP Generators, developed to guide businesses through writing BCP and DRP plans, possess an overall functionality similar to automated tax preparation tools. The BCP Generator builds a plan that guides a company through any disruption to normal operations, while the DRP Generator focuses on developing a plan specific to recovery of information technology systems. A Save and Exit option in both Generators enables users to complete their plans in increments, and a Print option enables users to produce and save hard copies.

The final component of the BCP Suite, a self-directed exercise for testing an implemented BCP, allows users to test their newly implemented business continuity and disaster recovery plans. This Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program compliant table top exercise focuses on a business’ recovery efforts following selected business disruptions intended to represent a broad spectrum of threats including hurricane, earthquake, ice storm, and blackout. The goal of the exercise is to improve a business’ overall recovery capabilities and actions and the collective decision making process. It is designed to be an open, thought-provoking exchange of ideas to help develop and expand existing knowledge of policies and procedures within the framework of an organization’s BCP implementation.

Business Continuity Video Training

Business Continuity Training – Introduction

An overview of the concepts detailed within this training. Also, included is a humorous, short video that introduces viewers to the concept of business continuity planning and highlights the benefits of having a plan. Two men in an elevator experience a spectrum of disasters from a loss of power, to rain, fire, and a human threat. One man is prepared for each disaster and the other is not.

Business Continuity Training – Part One

What is Business Continuity Planning?

An explanation of what business continuity planning means and what it entails to create a business continuity plan. This segment also incorporates an interview with a company that has successfully implemented a business continuity plan and includes a discussion about what business continuity planning means to them.

Business Continuity Training – Part Two

Why is Business Continuity Planning Important?

An examination of the value a business continuity plan can bring to an organization. This segment also incorporates an interview with a company that has successfully implemented a business continuity plan and includes a discussion about how business continuity planning has been valuable to them.

Business Continuity Training – Part Three

What is the Business Continuity Planning Process?

An overview of the business continuity planning process. This segment also incorporates an interview with a company about its process of successfully implementing a business continuity plan.

Business Continuity Training – Part Three

What is the Business Continuity Planning Process?

The first of six steps addressed in this Business Continuity Training, which detail the process of building a business continuity plan. This step addresses how organizations should “prepare” to create a business continuity plan.

Business Continuity Training – Part Three

What is the Business Continuity Planning Process?

The second of six steps addressed in this Business Continuity Training, which detail the process of building a business continuity plan. This step addresses how organizations should “define” their business continuity plan objectives.

Business Continuity Training – Part Three

What is the Business Continuity Planning Process?

Step 3: Identify

The third of six steps addressed in this Business Continuity Training, which detail the process of building a business continuity plan. This step addresses how organizations should “identify” and prioritize potential risks and impacts.

Business Continuity Training – Part Three

What is the Business Continuity Planning Process?

The fourth of six steps addressed in this Business Continuity Training, which detail the process of building a business continuity plan. This step addresses how organizations should “develop” business continuity strategies.

Business Continuity Training – Part Three

What is the Business Continuity Planning Process?

The fifth of six steps addressed in this Business Continuity Training, which detail the process of building a business continuity plan. This step addresses how organizations should define their “teams” and tasks.

Business Continuity Training – Part Three

What is the Business Continuity Planning Process?

The sixth of six steps addressed in this Business Continuity Training, which detail the process of building a business continuity plan. This step addresses how organizations should “test” their business continuity plans.





Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and

#business continuity plan

#

Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and guide

FREE DOWNLOAD:

SearchDisasterRecovery’s business continuity template

For many professionals, these steps present a formidable challenge. To make the process easier, people seek out alternatives, such as software, templates, checklists, or consultants. While each of these options can build a plan and its associated program elements, too often these tools are used to get something done quickly. Typically, the process involves some data gathering and interviewing, followed by a fill-in-the-blanks process that somehow magically creates a finished product.

SearchDisasterRecovery.com has created a free downloadable business continuity template to assist you in your business continuity planning. Download and print out our template, and then read the step-by-step guide below to create a successful business continuity plan .

A GUIDE TO USING OUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

Here’s a look a the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  • Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan, so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  • Revision management: Have a page that reflects your change management process.
  • Purpose and scope (Sections 1.1 through 1.6): Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  • How to use the plan (Sections 1.7.1 through 1.7.4): Provide information on circumstances under which the plan will be activated, including outage time frames, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted on this situation.
  • Provide policy information (Section 1.7.5): this is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  • Emergency response and management (Section 1.7.6): Specify situations in which the plan is to be activated and response procedures.
  • Use step-by-step procedures (Sections 1.7.7 through 1.7.10): These are easier to follow than broad general statements such as relocate to alternate building that require considerable details to work properly.
  • Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom (Section 1.8).
  • Assuming a situation has occurred, Section 2 provides steps to take to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  • Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as needed with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  • Section 3 addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company management.
  • Section 4 provides detailed instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  • Detailed appendices are provided in Section 5; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations. and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.
  • Additional forms can be found in Appendix 5.7; these should be developed in advance, validated by exercising (as is the entire plan) and kept in a ready-to-use format.

GENERAL BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING TIPS

Here’s a checklist of things to keep in mind during business continuity planning:

  • Take the process seriously. If you want to protect your business from unplanned events that could disrupt operations, create a plan. It doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate.
  • Use disaster recovery/business continuity standards as a starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use:
    1. NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard)
    2. BSI BS 25999 (the British standard)
    3. FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors)
    4. DRII/DRJ Generally Accepted Principles (GAP)
  • Keep it simple. Less can definitely be more in this situation, unless the user is primarily a technology-based group, such as IT.
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions. Assuming you are creating a plan to respond to specific incidents, include only the information needed for the response and subsequent recovery.
  • Make it happen. Once the business continuity plan is complete, exercise it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all department and/or locations in your organization; consider other templates, software or consultants.

The keys to a creating a successful business continuity plan are to define step-by-step procedures for response and recovery, validate these activities through periodic exercising, and maintain the plan and its various components up to date.

More business continuity template resources

About this author:
Paul F. Kirvan, FBCI, CBCP, CISSP, has more than 20 years experience in business continuity management as a consultant, author and educator. He is also secretary of the Business Continuity Institute USA Chapter.

This was first published in April 2009





Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide #printable

#business continuity plan

#

Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide

For small- to medium-sized businesses (SMBs), the business continuity planning process contains several steps. These include: project initiation, risk assessment, business impact assessment, strategy development, business continuity plan development, business continuity plan testing and maintenance, emergency communications, awareness and training, and coordination with public authorities. This is comparable to the business continuity process found in larger organizations except for the fact that for SMBs, the business continuity planning process can be simplified, depending on the size and complexity of the organization.

For many SMBs, the above business continuity planning activities pose a formidable challenge, especially from the perspectives of time, money and resources. To make the process easier, SMBs have several options, such as business continuity planning tools and software, business continuity templates. checklists or consultants. Each of these options can create a plan and its associated elements, however, because of their simplicity, SMBs often use them to get something done quickly. And regrettably, after a plan has been developed, that’s the end of the process. Few SMBs invest in exercises to make sure their plans will work.

In this business continuity planning guide, we’ll try and simplify this process for SMBs. We’ll start off with a more or less standard sample business continuity plan template. Read this guide, and then download our free sample business continuity plan template for smaller businesses and you’ll be well on your way to developing a successful business continuity plan.

FREE DOWNLOAD: BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

To have develop a successful business continuity plan, we recommend the following steps:

  • Make sure you have the right information. Your business continuity plan doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate. A one-page plan with the right information can be more valuable than a voluminous document that nobody can use.
  • Go to www.ready.gov (part of the Federal emergency Management Agency site) and look at the emergency plan development information available at that site. The information at ready.gov can serve as an effective complement to the template we provide in this report.
  • Standards can provide a useful starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use: NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard), BSI BS 25999 (the British standard) and FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors).
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions.
  • Make it happen. Once the plan is complete, exercise it semiannually it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all departments and/or locations in your organization.

Next, we’ll examine the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  1. Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan (emergency notification contacts), so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  2. Revision control page: This page is located on the second page of the plan and it reflects your change management process.
  3. Purpose and scope: Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  4. Instructions for using the plan: Provide information about when and how the plan will be activated, including outage timeframes, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted.
  5. Policy information: This is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  6. Emergency response and management: Specify situations in which the plan and response procedures are to be activated.
  7. Plan review and maintenance: Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom.
  8. Checklists and flow diagrams: Assuming a situation has occurred, have steps identified to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  9. Notification of incident affecting the site: Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as soon as possible with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  10. Decide on course of action: This section addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company leadership.
  11. Business recovery phase: This section provides instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  12. Appendixes: Detailed appendixes are provided at the end of the template; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations, and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.

The process of developing a business continuity plan for SMBs is generally a straightforward process. The keys to success include defining step-by-step response and recovery procedures, validating these activities through tests, and keeping the plan up to date.

This was first published in October 2010





What is business continuity management (BCM)? Definition from #good #business #names

#business continuity

#

business continuity management (BCM)

Business continuity management (BCM) is a framework for identifying an organization’s risk of exposure to internal and external threats.

The goal of BCM is to provide the organization with the ability to effectively respond to threats such as natural disasters or data breaches and protect the business interests of the organization. BCM includes disaster recovery. business recovery, crisis management, incident management, emergency management and contingency planning .

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According to ISO 22301. a business continuity management system emphasizes the importance of:

  • Understanding continuity and preparedness needs, as well as the necessity for establishing business continuity management policy and objectives.
  • Implementing and operating controls and measures for managing an organization’s overall continuity risks.
  • Monitoring and reviewing the performance and effectiveness of the business continuity management system.
  • Continual improvement based on objective measurements.




What is Business Continuity? #fox #news #business

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity is often described as ‘just common sense’. It is about taking responsibility for your business and enabling it to stay on course whatever storms it is forced to weather. It is about “keeping calm and carrying on”!

BC is about building and improving resilience in your business; it’s about identifying your key products and services and the most urgent activities that underpin them and then, once that ‘analysis’ is complete, it is about devising plans and strategies that will enable you to continue your business operations and enable you to recover quickly and effectively from any type disruption whatever its size or cause. It gives you a solid framework to lean on in times of crisis and provides stability and security. In fact, embedding BC into your business is proven to bring business benefits.

Business Continuity (BC) is defined as the capability of the organization to continue delivery of products or services at acceptable predefined levels following a disruptive incident. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

Business Continuity Management (BCM) is defined as a holistic management process that identifies potential threats to an organization and the impacts to business operations those threats, if realized, might cause, and which provides a framework for building organizational resilience with the capability of an effective response that safeguards the interests of its key stakeholders, reputation, brand and value-creating activities. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

At the heart of good BC practice, sits the BCM Lifecycle.

The BCM Lifecycle shows the stages of activity that an organization moves through and repeats with the overall aim of improving organizational resilience. These stages are referred to as the Professional Practices and are made up of Management and Technical Practices.

Find out more about business continuity by downloading the GPG Lite for free, or why not take our eLearning Building Resilience course that will take you through the basics of making your organization more resilient in the face of an incident.

Watch a short four minute video to hear about the importance of Business Continuity Management:





The Business Continuity Institute #free #business #listings

#business continuity

#

What is the future of BC?

The BCI and PwC have been considering the future of business continuity and the challenges to us as professionals. The growing emphasis on resilience has led us to consider what the future holds, and we’d like to understand what you think too. Please do complete our short survey and share your thoughts. All respondents will be in with a chance of winning a £100 Amazon gift card.

New BCI Executive Director

The BCI is delighted to welcome David Thorp as its new Executive Director, taking over from Lorraine Darke who steps down at the end of the year in order to enjoy an early retirement after 12 years at the BCI. David is set to join the BCI on the 3rd October when he leaves his current role as Managing Director of the Security Institute. Read more here .

Salary Benchmarking Report

The BCI Salary Benchmarking Report is a global study of business continuity professionals, and an analysis of their remuneration to highlight variations between location, education, gender and industry. The report can be downloaded from the members’ area of the BCI website. If you are not a member, but would like to join as an Affiliate in order to gain access to the report, just click here .

The impact of Brexit

With the UK voting to leave the EU, is your organization prepared for Brexit? The BCI has published two papers to help you consider what steps you need to take to make your organization more resilient during this period of change. Download you free copy of ‘Horizon scanning post-Brexit: What should businesses prepare for? ‘ and ‘Brexit: Analysing the impact of change ‘ to give you some ideas to think about.

BCI World Conference

We believe we have created our best programme yet for the BCI World Conference, one for seasoned professionals and new, one that encompasses all of the current thinking, and one that includes keynotes, case studies, panel sessions, workshops and research. From ‘how to build organizational resilience’ to ‘cyber security’, from ‘getting buy-in’ to ‘building a response capability to deal with the threat of terrorism’, we have it all covered, see for yourself .

How To Guides

The BCI is pleased to present a new range of ‘How To Guides’ which can act as further study and reference resources. The six guides, each based on one of the stages of the BCM Lifecycle, are consistent with the current GPG and contain examples and advice which may be adapted to suit your working environment. The guides are available in the BCI Shop and BCI members are entitled to a substantial discount.

Continuity Magazine

The latest edition of Continuity Magazine has now hit the shelves – an edition packed full of news, research and opinion on the continuity and resilience industry. With articles on pandemics, GDPR, crisis management, BC metrics, disaster recovery, and resilience in the community, there is something for everyone. Download your FREE copy today.

Cyber Resilience Report

The BCI Cyber Resilience Report is an analysis of cyber security incidents experienced by organizations across the world, and how they respond to them. These types of incidents are not rare occurrences with two-thirds of organizations experiencing at least one during the previous year. The report, sponsored by Crises Control, can be downloaded for free by clicking here .





Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide #business

#business continuity plan

#

Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide

For small- to medium-sized businesses (SMBs), the business continuity planning process contains several steps. These include: project initiation, risk assessment, business impact assessment, strategy development, business continuity plan development, business continuity plan testing and maintenance, emergency communications, awareness and training, and coordination with public authorities. This is comparable to the business continuity process found in larger organizations except for the fact that for SMBs, the business continuity planning process can be simplified, depending on the size and complexity of the organization.

For many SMBs, the above business continuity planning activities pose a formidable challenge, especially from the perspectives of time, money and resources. To make the process easier, SMBs have several options, such as business continuity planning tools and software, business continuity templates. checklists or consultants. Each of these options can create a plan and its associated elements, however, because of their simplicity, SMBs often use them to get something done quickly. And regrettably, after a plan has been developed, that’s the end of the process. Few SMBs invest in exercises to make sure their plans will work.

In this business continuity planning guide, we’ll try and simplify this process for SMBs. We’ll start off with a more or less standard sample business continuity plan template. Read this guide, and then download our free sample business continuity plan template for smaller businesses and you’ll be well on your way to developing a successful business continuity plan.

FREE DOWNLOAD: BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

To have develop a successful business continuity plan, we recommend the following steps:

  • Make sure you have the right information. Your business continuity plan doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate. A one-page plan with the right information can be more valuable than a voluminous document that nobody can use.
  • Go to www.ready.gov (part of the Federal emergency Management Agency site) and look at the emergency plan development information available at that site. The information at ready.gov can serve as an effective complement to the template we provide in this report.
  • Standards can provide a useful starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use: NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard), BSI BS 25999 (the British standard) and FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors).
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions.
  • Make it happen. Once the plan is complete, exercise it semiannually it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all departments and/or locations in your organization.

Next, we’ll examine the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  1. Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan (emergency notification contacts), so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  2. Revision control page: This page is located on the second page of the plan and it reflects your change management process.
  3. Purpose and scope: Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  4. Instructions for using the plan: Provide information about when and how the plan will be activated, including outage timeframes, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted.
  5. Policy information: This is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  6. Emergency response and management: Specify situations in which the plan and response procedures are to be activated.
  7. Plan review and maintenance: Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom.
  8. Checklists and flow diagrams: Assuming a situation has occurred, have steps identified to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  9. Notification of incident affecting the site: Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as soon as possible with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  10. Decide on course of action: This section addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company leadership.
  11. Business recovery phase: This section provides instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  12. Appendixes: Detailed appendixes are provided at the end of the template; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations, and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.

The process of developing a business continuity plan for SMBs is generally a straightforward process. The keys to success include defining step-by-step response and recovery procedures, validating these activities through tests, and keeping the plan up to date.

This was first published in October 2010





How to Create an Effective Business Continuity Plan #business #leads

#business continuity plan

#

How to Create an Effective Business Continuity Plan

We rarely get a head’s up that a disaster is ready to strike. Even with some lead time, though, multiple things can go wrong; every incident is unique and unfolds in unexpected ways.

This is where a business continuity plan comes into play. To give your organization the best shot at success during a disaster, you need to put a current, tested plan in the hands of all personnel responsible for carrying out any part of that plan. The lack of a plan doesn’t just mean your organization will take longer than necessary to recover from an event or incident. You could go out of business for good.

How Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery Plans Differ

Business continuity (BC) refers to maintaining business functions or quickly resuming them in the event of a major disruption, whether caused by a fire, flood, epidemic illness or a malicious attack across the Internet. A BC plan outlines procedures and instructions an organization must follow in the face of such disasters; it covers business processes, assets, human resources, business partners and more.

Many people think a disaster recovery plan is the same as a business continuity plan, but a DR plan focuses mainly on restoring IT infrastructure and operations after a crisis. It’s actually just one part of a complete business continuity plan, as a BC plan looks at the continuity of the entire organization. Do you have a way to get HR, manufacturing, and sales and support functionally up and running so the company can continue to make money right after a disaster?

For example, if the building that houses your customer service representatives is flattened by a tornado, do you know how those reps can handle customer calls? Will they work from home temporarily, or from an alternate location? Companies such as SunGard sell access to cubicles that include a desk, phone and computer in their recovery centers, along with server- and device-based DR services.

Note that a business impact analysis (BIA) is another part of a BC plan. A BIA identifies the impact of a sudden loss of business functions, usually quantified in a cost. Such analysis also helps you evaluate whether you should outsource non-core activities in your BCP, which can come with its own risks. The BIA essentially helps you look at your entire organization’s processes and determine which are most important.

Why Business Continuity Planning Matters

Whether you operate a small business or a large corporation, you strive to remain competitive. It’s vital to retain current customers while increasing your customer base — and there’s no better test of your capability to do so than right after an adverse event.

Because restoring IT is critical for most companies, numerous disaster recovery solutions are available. You can rely on IT to implement those solutions. But what about the rest of your business functions? Your company’s future depends on your people and processes. Being able to handle any incident effectively can have a positive effect on your company’s reputation and market value, and it can increase customer confidence.

First, Create a Business Continuity Plan

If your organization doesn’t have a BC plan in place, start by assessing your business processes, determining which areas are vulnerable, and the potential losses if those processes go down for a day, a few days or a week. This is essentially a (BIA).

Next, develop a plan. You can use any number of free templates available online or find an actual plan published by an organization similar to yours and modify it as needed.

There are six general steps involved in creating a business continuity plan:

  1. Identify the scope of the plan.
  2. Identify key business areas.
  3. Identify critical functions.
  4. Identify dependencies between various business areas and functions.
  5. Determine acceptable downtime for each critical function.
  6. Create a plan to maintain operations.

One common business continuity planning tool is a checklist that includes supplies and equipment, the location of data backups and backup sites, where the plan is available and who should have it, and contact information for emergency responders, key personnel and backup site providers.

Remember that the disaster recovery plan is part of the business continuity plan, so check with your IT department to ensure it has or is actively developing a DR plan.

As you create your plan, consider interviewing key personnel in organizations who have gone through a disaster successfully. People generally like to share “war stories” and the steps and techniques (or clever ideas) that saved the day. Their insights could prove incredibly valuable in helping you to craft a solid business continuity plan.

Then, Test Your Business Continuity Plan

You have to rigorously test a plan to know if it’s complete and will fulfill its intended purpose. Many organizations test a business continuity plan two to four times a year. The schedule depends on your type of organization, the amount of turnover of key personnel and the number of business processes and IT changes that have occurred since the last round of testing.

Common tests include table-top exercises, structured walk-throughs and simulations. Test teams are usually composed of the recovery coordinator and members from each functional unit.

A table-top exercise usually occurs in a conference room with the team poring over the plan, looking for gaps and ensuring that all business units are represented therein.

In a structured walk-through. each team member walks through his or components of the plan in detail to identify weaknesses. Often, the team works through the test with a specific disaster in mind. Some organizations incorporate drills and disaster role-playing into the structured walk-through. Any weaknesses should be corrected and an updated plan distributed to all pertinent staff.

It’s also a good idea to conduct a full emergency evacuation drill at least once a year. This type of test lets you determine if you need to make special arrangements to evacuate staff members who have physical limitations.

Lastly, disaster simulation testing can be quite involved and should be performed annually. For this test, create an environment that simulates an actual disaster, with all the equipment, supplies, and personnel (including business partners and vendors) who would be needed. The purpose of a simulation is to determine if you can carry out critical business functions during the event.

During each phase of business continuity plan testing, include some new employees on the test team. “Fresh eyes” might detect gaps or lapses of information that experienced team members could overlook.

Finally, Review and Improve Your Business Continuity Plan

Much effort goes into creating and initially testing a BC plan. Once that job is complete, some organizations let the plan sit while other, more critical tasks get attention. When this happens, plans go stale and are of no use when needed.

Technology evolves, and people come and go, so the plan needs to be updated, too. Bring key personnel together at least annually to review the plan and discuss any areas that must be modified.

Prior to the review, solicit feedback from staff to incorporate into the plan. Ask all departments or business units to review the plan, including branch locations or other remote units. If you’ve had the misfortune of facing a disaster and had to put the plan into action, be sure to incorporate lessons learned. Many organizations conduct a review in tandem with a table-top exercise or structured walk-through.

How to Ensure Business Continuity Plan Support, Awareness

One way to ensure your plan is not successful is to adopt a casual attitude toward its importance. Every business continuity plan must be supported from the top down. That means senior management must be represented when creating and updating the plan; no one can delegate that responsibility to subordinates. In addition, the plan is likely to remain fresh and viable if senior management makes it a priority by dedicating time for adequate review and testing.

Management is also key to promoting user awareness. If employees don’t know about the plan, how will they be able to react appropriately when every minute counts? Although plan distribution and training can be conducted by business unit managers or HR staff, have someone from the top kick off training and punctuate its significance. It’ll have a greater impact on all employees, giving the plan more credibility and urgency.

Follow everything from CIO





What is Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)? Definition from #harvard #business

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR or BC/DR) are closely related practices that describe an organization’s preparation for unforeseen risks to continued operations. The trend of combining business continuity and disaster recovery into a single term has resulted from a growing recognition that both business executives and technology executives need to be collaborating closely instead of developing plans in isolation.

Download this free guide

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How to Create an Effective Business Continuity Plan #register #a #business

#business continuity plan

#

How to Create an Effective Business Continuity Plan

We rarely get a head’s up that a disaster is ready to strike. Even with some lead time, though, multiple things can go wrong; every incident is unique and unfolds in unexpected ways.

This is where a business continuity plan comes into play. To give your organization the best shot at success during a disaster, you need to put a current, tested plan in the hands of all personnel responsible for carrying out any part of that plan. The lack of a plan doesn’t just mean your organization will take longer than necessary to recover from an event or incident. You could go out of business for good.

How Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery Plans Differ

Business continuity (BC) refers to maintaining business functions or quickly resuming them in the event of a major disruption, whether caused by a fire, flood, epidemic illness or a malicious attack across the Internet. A BC plan outlines procedures and instructions an organization must follow in the face of such disasters; it covers business processes, assets, human resources, business partners and more.

Many people think a disaster recovery plan is the same as a business continuity plan, but a DR plan focuses mainly on restoring IT infrastructure and operations after a crisis. It’s actually just one part of a complete business continuity plan, as a BC plan looks at the continuity of the entire organization. Do you have a way to get HR, manufacturing, and sales and support functionally up and running so the company can continue to make money right after a disaster?

For example, if the building that houses your customer service representatives is flattened by a tornado, do you know how those reps can handle customer calls? Will they work from home temporarily, or from an alternate location? Companies such as SunGard sell access to cubicles that include a desk, phone and computer in their recovery centers, along with server- and device-based DR services.

Note that a business impact analysis (BIA) is another part of a BC plan. A BIA identifies the impact of a sudden loss of business functions, usually quantified in a cost. Such analysis also helps you evaluate whether you should outsource non-core activities in your BCP, which can come with its own risks. The BIA essentially helps you look at your entire organization’s processes and determine which are most important.

Why Business Continuity Planning Matters

Whether you operate a small business or a large corporation, you strive to remain competitive. It’s vital to retain current customers while increasing your customer base — and there’s no better test of your capability to do so than right after an adverse event.

Because restoring IT is critical for most companies, numerous disaster recovery solutions are available. You can rely on IT to implement those solutions. But what about the rest of your business functions? Your company’s future depends on your people and processes. Being able to handle any incident effectively can have a positive effect on your company’s reputation and market value, and it can increase customer confidence.

First, Create a Business Continuity Plan

If your organization doesn’t have a BC plan in place, start by assessing your business processes, determining which areas are vulnerable, and the potential losses if those processes go down for a day, a few days or a week. This is essentially a (BIA).

Next, develop a plan. You can use any number of free templates available online or find an actual plan published by an organization similar to yours and modify it as needed.

There are six general steps involved in creating a business continuity plan:

  1. Identify the scope of the plan.
  2. Identify key business areas.
  3. Identify critical functions.
  4. Identify dependencies between various business areas and functions.
  5. Determine acceptable downtime for each critical function.
  6. Create a plan to maintain operations.

One common business continuity planning tool is a checklist that includes supplies and equipment, the location of data backups and backup sites, where the plan is available and who should have it, and contact information for emergency responders, key personnel and backup site providers.

Remember that the disaster recovery plan is part of the business continuity plan, so check with your IT department to ensure it has or is actively developing a DR plan.

As you create your plan, consider interviewing key personnel in organizations who have gone through a disaster successfully. People generally like to share “war stories” and the steps and techniques (or clever ideas) that saved the day. Their insights could prove incredibly valuable in helping you to craft a solid business continuity plan.

Then, Test Your Business Continuity Plan

You have to rigorously test a plan to know if it’s complete and will fulfill its intended purpose. Many organizations test a business continuity plan two to four times a year. The schedule depends on your type of organization, the amount of turnover of key personnel and the number of business processes and IT changes that have occurred since the last round of testing.

Common tests include table-top exercises, structured walk-throughs and simulations. Test teams are usually composed of the recovery coordinator and members from each functional unit.

A table-top exercise usually occurs in a conference room with the team poring over the plan, looking for gaps and ensuring that all business units are represented therein.

In a structured walk-through. each team member walks through his or components of the plan in detail to identify weaknesses. Often, the team works through the test with a specific disaster in mind. Some organizations incorporate drills and disaster role-playing into the structured walk-through. Any weaknesses should be corrected and an updated plan distributed to all pertinent staff.

It’s also a good idea to conduct a full emergency evacuation drill at least once a year. This type of test lets you determine if you need to make special arrangements to evacuate staff members who have physical limitations.

Lastly, disaster simulation testing can be quite involved and should be performed annually. For this test, create an environment that simulates an actual disaster, with all the equipment, supplies, and personnel (including business partners and vendors) who would be needed. The purpose of a simulation is to determine if you can carry out critical business functions during the event.

During each phase of business continuity plan testing, include some new employees on the test team. “Fresh eyes” might detect gaps or lapses of information that experienced team members could overlook.

Finally, Review and Improve Your Business Continuity Plan

Much effort goes into creating and initially testing a BC plan. Once that job is complete, some organizations let the plan sit while other, more critical tasks get attention. When this happens, plans go stale and are of no use when needed.

Technology evolves, and people come and go, so the plan needs to be updated, too. Bring key personnel together at least annually to review the plan and discuss any areas that must be modified.

Prior to the review, solicit feedback from staff to incorporate into the plan. Ask all departments or business units to review the plan, including branch locations or other remote units. If you’ve had the misfortune of facing a disaster and had to put the plan into action, be sure to incorporate lessons learned. Many organizations conduct a review in tandem with a table-top exercise or structured walk-through.

How to Ensure Business Continuity Plan Support, Awareness

One way to ensure your plan is not successful is to adopt a casual attitude toward its importance. Every business continuity plan must be supported from the top down. That means senior management must be represented when creating and updating the plan; no one can delegate that responsibility to subordinates. In addition, the plan is likely to remain fresh and viable if senior management makes it a priority by dedicating time for adequate review and testing.

Management is also key to promoting user awareness. If employees don’t know about the plan, how will they be able to react appropriately when every minute counts? Although plan distribution and training can be conducted by business unit managers or HR staff, have someone from the top kick off training and punctuate its significance. It’ll have a greater impact on all employees, giving the plan more credibility and urgency.

Follow everything from CIO





Business Continuity Planning for Hedge Funds and Investment Firms #business #management #degree

#business continuity plan

#

Business Continuity

Eze Business Continuity Planning

Hedge funds and private equity firms firms must react swiftly, methodically and successfully when confronted with unexpected business disruptions or else risk significant financial loss. This level of response requires extensive business continuity planning to ensure all aspects of a firm’s business are evaluated and protected.

Effective Business Continuity Planning (BCP) can help minimize financial loss and the negative effects of disruptions on an investment firm’s strategic plans, market position, operations, and reputation.

Eze Castle’s Business Continuity Planning Services (Eze BCP) extend beyond technology to focus on critical operations and processes that hedge funds or investment firms must have available if a disaster strikes. Our Eze BCP consultants are certified experts in business continuity planning and possess deep knowledge of the unique operations of financial services firms.

This combined expertise means a client gains a custom, comprehensive BCP plan developed and managed by professionals that understand the client’s business. And our hedge fund business continuity consultants work with clients to address the full spectrum of BCP.

Eze BCP Features

  • Delivered by Certified Business Continuity Professionals who work exclusively with hedge fund and private equity firms
  • Industry-specific experience, knowledge and focus make our team pros at identifying a company’s potential exposures — our team knows the risks facing the investment management industry
  • Proven methodology to ensure your firm is prepared for the unexpected
  • Annual review of BCP documentation and updates to account for business changes
  • Employee training sessions and executive roundtables run by an Eze seasoned hedge fund business continuity consultant

Learn More about BCP

Learn more about Eze Castle’s business continuity planning service and how our certified BCP experts can prepare your firm for a disaster.

This guidebook is designed to help hedge fund managers of all sizes develop an understanding of both the BCP and DR planning processes.

Eze BCP Methodology

1. Risk Assessment

Our business continuity consultants will identify and prioritize potential business risks and disruptions based on severity and likelihood of occurrence. Key elements of Eze Castle’s Risk Assessment phase include:

  • Evaluation of the company’s risks and exposures
  • Assessment of the potential impact of various business disruption scenarios
  • Determination of the most likely threat scenarios
  • Assessment of telecommunication recovery options and communication plans
  • Prioritization of findings and development of a roadmap

2. Business Impact Analysis

Eze Castle’s hedge fund BCP experts will collect information on a wide range of areas from recovery assumptions and critical business processes to interdependencies and critical staff. Key elements of Eze Castle’s BIA phase include:

  • Determination of the maximum amount of downtime business processes can withstand
  • Development of recovery point objectives and recovery time objectives for critical functions (e.g. applications, systems, etc.)
  • Identification of critical business processes and workflows and the supporting applications
  • Outlining of internal and external dependencies
  • Determination of critical staff members as well as backups with similar skill sets

3. Strategy and Plan Development

Our certified business continuity planners will create department, division and site level plans for your business. Key elements of this phase include:

  • Synthesis of Risk Assessment and BIA findings
  • Development of plans for department, division and site level contingencies
  • Review of plans with key stakeholders to obtain executive sign-off on overall plan
  • Creation of offsite, secure web repository where the firm’s BCP plan is stored for easy access from virtually anywhere during an outage or disaster

4. Plan Testing, Training and Maintenance

Business continuity plans are living documents and must be updated annually to ensure they account for changes within the firm as well as any changes in risk scenarios. Key elements of this ongoing phase include:

  • Conducting of tabletop and simulation exercises to help ensure employees are effectively trained
  • Development of employee training sessions
  • Review of BCP, business impact analysis and risks annually by an Eze hedge fund business continuity consultant
  • Execution of the annual review process to guarantee new threats and business process changes are accurately represented in the BCP




What is Business Continuity? #business #partner

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity is often described as ‘just common sense’. It is about taking responsibility for your business and enabling it to stay on course whatever storms it is forced to weather. It is about “keeping calm and carrying on”!

BC is about building and improving resilience in your business; it’s about identifying your key products and services and the most urgent activities that underpin them and then, once that ‘analysis’ is complete, it is about devising plans and strategies that will enable you to continue your business operations and enable you to recover quickly and effectively from any type disruption whatever its size or cause. It gives you a solid framework to lean on in times of crisis and provides stability and security. In fact, embedding BC into your business is proven to bring business benefits.

Business Continuity (BC) is defined as the capability of the organization to continue delivery of products or services at acceptable predefined levels following a disruptive incident. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

Business Continuity Management (BCM) is defined as a holistic management process that identifies potential threats to an organization and the impacts to business operations those threats, if realized, might cause, and which provides a framework for building organizational resilience with the capability of an effective response that safeguards the interests of its key stakeholders, reputation, brand and value-creating activities. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

At the heart of good BC practice, sits the BCM Lifecycle.

The BCM Lifecycle shows the stages of activity that an organization moves through and repeats with the overall aim of improving organizational resilience. These stages are referred to as the Professional Practices and are made up of Management and Technical Practices.

Find out more about business continuity by downloading the GPG Lite for free, or why not take our eLearning Building Resilience course that will take you through the basics of making your organization more resilient in the face of an incident.

Watch a short four minute video to hear about the importance of Business Continuity Management:





Business Continuity Planning (BCP) Definition #business #card #template

#business continuity plan

#

Business Continuity Planning – BCP

What is the ‘Business Continuity Planning – BCP’

The business continuity planning (BCP) is the creation of a strategy through the recognition of threats and risks facing a company, with an eye to ensure that personnel and assets are protected and able to function in the event of a disaster. Business continuity planning (BCP) involves defining potential risks, determining how those risks will affect operations, implementing safeguards and procedures designed to mitigate those risks, testing those procedures to ensure that they work, and periodically reviewing the process to make sure that it is up to date.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Business Continuity Planning – BCP’

Businesses can face a host of disasters that range from minor to catastrophic. BCP typically will help a company to continue operating in the case of many disasters, such as fires, but may not be as effective if a large portion of the population is affected, such as in the case of a disease outbreak. One example of BCP would be a finance company based in a major city backing up its computer and client files offsite, so that if something would happen to the corporate office, satellite offices would still have access to important information.





Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide #business

#business continuity plan

#

Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide

For small- to medium-sized businesses (SMBs), the business continuity planning process contains several steps. These include: project initiation, risk assessment, business impact assessment, strategy development, business continuity plan development, business continuity plan testing and maintenance, emergency communications, awareness and training, and coordination with public authorities. This is comparable to the business continuity process found in larger organizations except for the fact that for SMBs, the business continuity planning process can be simplified, depending on the size and complexity of the organization.

For many SMBs, the above business continuity planning activities pose a formidable challenge, especially from the perspectives of time, money and resources. To make the process easier, SMBs have several options, such as business continuity planning tools and software, business continuity templates. checklists or consultants. Each of these options can create a plan and its associated elements, however, because of their simplicity, SMBs often use them to get something done quickly. And regrettably, after a plan has been developed, that’s the end of the process. Few SMBs invest in exercises to make sure their plans will work.

In this business continuity planning guide, we’ll try and simplify this process for SMBs. We’ll start off with a more or less standard sample business continuity plan template. Read this guide, and then download our free sample business continuity plan template for smaller businesses and you’ll be well on your way to developing a successful business continuity plan.

FREE DOWNLOAD: BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

To have develop a successful business continuity plan, we recommend the following steps:

  • Make sure you have the right information. Your business continuity plan doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate. A one-page plan with the right information can be more valuable than a voluminous document that nobody can use.
  • Go to www.ready.gov (part of the Federal emergency Management Agency site) and look at the emergency plan development information available at that site. The information at ready.gov can serve as an effective complement to the template we provide in this report.
  • Standards can provide a useful starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use: NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard), BSI BS 25999 (the British standard) and FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors).
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions.
  • Make it happen. Once the plan is complete, exercise it semiannually it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all departments and/or locations in your organization.

Next, we’ll examine the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  1. Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan (emergency notification contacts), so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  2. Revision control page: This page is located on the second page of the plan and it reflects your change management process.
  3. Purpose and scope: Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  4. Instructions for using the plan: Provide information about when and how the plan will be activated, including outage timeframes, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted.
  5. Policy information: This is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  6. Emergency response and management: Specify situations in which the plan and response procedures are to be activated.
  7. Plan review and maintenance: Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom.
  8. Checklists and flow diagrams: Assuming a situation has occurred, have steps identified to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  9. Notification of incident affecting the site: Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as soon as possible with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  10. Decide on course of action: This section addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company leadership.
  11. Business recovery phase: This section provides instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  12. Appendixes: Detailed appendixes are provided at the end of the template; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations, and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.

The process of developing a business continuity plan for SMBs is generally a straightforward process. The keys to success include defining step-by-step response and recovery procedures, validating these activities through tests, and keeping the plan up to date.

This was first published in October 2010





Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and

#business continuity plan

#

Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and guide

FREE DOWNLOAD:

SearchDisasterRecovery’s business continuity template

For many professionals, these steps present a formidable challenge. To make the process easier, people seek out alternatives, such as software, templates, checklists, or consultants. While each of these options can build a plan and its associated program elements, too often these tools are used to get something done quickly. Typically, the process involves some data gathering and interviewing, followed by a fill-in-the-blanks process that somehow magically creates a finished product.

SearchDisasterRecovery.com has created a free downloadable business continuity template to assist you in your business continuity planning. Download and print out our template, and then read the step-by-step guide below to create a successful business continuity plan .

A GUIDE TO USING OUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

Here’s a look a the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  • Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan, so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  • Revision management: Have a page that reflects your change management process.
  • Purpose and scope (Sections 1.1 through 1.6): Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  • How to use the plan (Sections 1.7.1 through 1.7.4): Provide information on circumstances under which the plan will be activated, including outage time frames, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted on this situation.
  • Provide policy information (Section 1.7.5): this is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  • Emergency response and management (Section 1.7.6): Specify situations in which the plan is to be activated and response procedures.
  • Use step-by-step procedures (Sections 1.7.7 through 1.7.10): These are easier to follow than broad general statements such as relocate to alternate building that require considerable details to work properly.
  • Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom (Section 1.8).
  • Assuming a situation has occurred, Section 2 provides steps to take to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  • Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as needed with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  • Section 3 addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company management.
  • Section 4 provides detailed instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  • Detailed appendices are provided in Section 5; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations. and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.
  • Additional forms can be found in Appendix 5.7; these should be developed in advance, validated by exercising (as is the entire plan) and kept in a ready-to-use format.

GENERAL BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING TIPS

Here’s a checklist of things to keep in mind during business continuity planning:

  • Take the process seriously. If you want to protect your business from unplanned events that could disrupt operations, create a plan. It doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate.
  • Use disaster recovery/business continuity standards as a starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use:
    1. NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard)
    2. BSI BS 25999 (the British standard)
    3. FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors)
    4. DRII/DRJ Generally Accepted Principles (GAP)
  • Keep it simple. Less can definitely be more in this situation, unless the user is primarily a technology-based group, such as IT.
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions. Assuming you are creating a plan to respond to specific incidents, include only the information needed for the response and subsequent recovery.
  • Make it happen. Once the business continuity plan is complete, exercise it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all department and/or locations in your organization; consider other templates, software or consultants.

The keys to a creating a successful business continuity plan are to define step-by-step procedures for response and recovery, validate these activities through periodic exercising, and maintain the plan and its various components up to date.

More business continuity template resources

About this author:
Paul F. Kirvan, FBCI, CBCP, CISSP, has more than 20 years experience in business continuity management as a consultant, author and educator. He is also secretary of the Business Continuity Institute USA Chapter.

This was first published in April 2009





What is business continuity management (BCM)? Definition from #entrepreneur #ideas

#business continuity

#

business continuity management (BCM)

Business continuity management (BCM) is a framework for identifying an organization’s risk of exposure to internal and external threats.

The goal of BCM is to provide the organization with the ability to effectively respond to threats such as natural disasters or data breaches and protect the business interests of the organization. BCM includes disaster recovery. business recovery, crisis management, incident management, emergency management and contingency planning .

Download this free guide

Download 9 FREE Strategic Planning Templates that your Peers Already Use

Having a clear-cut IT strategy is key establishing a competitive advantage over any competition. It can be the difference maker between a business’ success and its failure. Reach your business goals and stay organized by downloading this FREE e-guide which includes 9 templates already in use by major organizations such as NASA and Brown University.

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According to ISO 22301. a business continuity management system emphasizes the importance of:

  • Understanding continuity and preparedness needs, as well as the necessity for establishing business continuity management policy and objectives.
  • Implementing and operating controls and measures for managing an organization’s overall continuity risks.
  • Monitoring and reviewing the performance and effectiveness of the business continuity management system.
  • Continual improvement based on objective measurements.




What is Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)? Definition from #business #from

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR or BC/DR) are closely related practices that describe an organization’s preparation for unforeseen risks to continued operations. The trend of combining business continuity and disaster recovery into a single term has resulted from a growing recognition that both business executives and technology executives need to be collaborating closely instead of developing plans in isolation.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

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What is business continuance (business continuity)? Definition from #business #reports

#business continuity

#

business continuance (business continuity)

Business continuance is a strategy for putting the processes and procedures in place that an organization requires to operate during and after a disaster. Business continuance plans seek to prevent mission-critical services from being interrupted and re-establish full operations as swiftly and smoothly as possible.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

You also agree that your personal information may be transferred and processed in the United States, and that you have read and agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy .

The first step in business continuance planning is to decide which of an organization’s functions are absolutely essential, and apportion budget for recovery accordingly. Although business continuance is important for any enterprise, it may not be practical for any but the largest to maintain full functioning throughout a disaster crisis. Once crucial components have been identified, the second step is to put failover mechanisms in place to ensure that operations can carry on with minimal interruption in the event of a disaster. Ideally, an organization maintains up-to-date copies of data in geographically dispersed locations so that data access can continue uninterrupted if one location is disabled.

Every business continuance action plan should include a disaster recovery plan that documents an organization’s planned strategies for post-failure procedures; a business resumption plan that documents how essential services at the crisis location will be restored; a business recovery plan that documents how to recover business functions at an alternate location; and a contingency plan that documents what actions should be carried out if operations cannot continue at the crisis center or alternate location.

Business continuance became an increasingly common area of concern since the September 2001 World Trade Center disaster, in which an unforeseen incident created a sudden and severe threat to crucial functions for a number of companies. Business continuance is sometimes referred to as business continuity or more recently, business resilience .

This was last updated in August 2016

Continue Reading About business continuance (business continuity)

Related Terms

Ceph Ceph is open source software providing scalable object-, block- and file-based storage under a unified system. Red Hat and SUSE. See complete definition petabyte (PB) A petabyte is a unit of data storage space consisting of 1,024 terabytes, or approximately 1 million gigabytes. The prefix ‘peta’. See complete definition RAM (random access memory) Random access memory is where the operating system, application programs and data in current use are kept in a computing device. See complete definition

Dig Deeper on Enterprise storage, planning and management





Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide #best

#business continuity plan

#

Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide

For small- to medium-sized businesses (SMBs), the business continuity planning process contains several steps. These include: project initiation, risk assessment, business impact assessment, strategy development, business continuity plan development, business continuity plan testing and maintenance, emergency communications, awareness and training, and coordination with public authorities. This is comparable to the business continuity process found in larger organizations except for the fact that for SMBs, the business continuity planning process can be simplified, depending on the size and complexity of the organization.

For many SMBs, the above business continuity planning activities pose a formidable challenge, especially from the perspectives of time, money and resources. To make the process easier, SMBs have several options, such as business continuity planning tools and software, business continuity templates. checklists or consultants. Each of these options can create a plan and its associated elements, however, because of their simplicity, SMBs often use them to get something done quickly. And regrettably, after a plan has been developed, that’s the end of the process. Few SMBs invest in exercises to make sure their plans will work.

In this business continuity planning guide, we’ll try and simplify this process for SMBs. We’ll start off with a more or less standard sample business continuity plan template. Read this guide, and then download our free sample business continuity plan template for smaller businesses and you’ll be well on your way to developing a successful business continuity plan.

FREE DOWNLOAD: BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

To have develop a successful business continuity plan, we recommend the following steps:

  • Make sure you have the right information. Your business continuity plan doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate. A one-page plan with the right information can be more valuable than a voluminous document that nobody can use.
  • Go to www.ready.gov (part of the Federal emergency Management Agency site) and look at the emergency plan development information available at that site. The information at ready.gov can serve as an effective complement to the template we provide in this report.
  • Standards can provide a useful starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use: NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard), BSI BS 25999 (the British standard) and FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors).
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions.
  • Make it happen. Once the plan is complete, exercise it semiannually it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all departments and/or locations in your organization.

Next, we’ll examine the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  1. Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan (emergency notification contacts), so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  2. Revision control page: This page is located on the second page of the plan and it reflects your change management process.
  3. Purpose and scope: Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  4. Instructions for using the plan: Provide information about when and how the plan will be activated, including outage timeframes, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted.
  5. Policy information: This is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  6. Emergency response and management: Specify situations in which the plan and response procedures are to be activated.
  7. Plan review and maintenance: Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom.
  8. Checklists and flow diagrams: Assuming a situation has occurred, have steps identified to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  9. Notification of incident affecting the site: Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as soon as possible with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  10. Decide on course of action: This section addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company leadership.
  11. Business recovery phase: This section provides instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  12. Appendixes: Detailed appendixes are provided at the end of the template; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations, and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.

The process of developing a business continuity plan for SMBs is generally a straightforward process. The keys to success include defining step-by-step response and recovery procedures, validating these activities through tests, and keeping the plan up to date.

This was first published in October 2010





Business Continuity Planning for Hedge Funds and Investment Firms #business #savings #account

#business continuity plan

#

Business Continuity

Eze Business Continuity Planning

Hedge funds and private equity firms firms must react swiftly, methodically and successfully when confronted with unexpected business disruptions or else risk significant financial loss. This level of response requires extensive business continuity planning to ensure all aspects of a firm’s business are evaluated and protected.

Effective Business Continuity Planning (BCP) can help minimize financial loss and the negative effects of disruptions on an investment firm’s strategic plans, market position, operations, and reputation.

Eze Castle’s Business Continuity Planning Services (Eze BCP) extend beyond technology to focus on critical operations and processes that hedge funds or investment firms must have available if a disaster strikes. Our Eze BCP consultants are certified experts in business continuity planning and possess deep knowledge of the unique operations of financial services firms.

This combined expertise means a client gains a custom, comprehensive BCP plan developed and managed by professionals that understand the client’s business. And our hedge fund business continuity consultants work with clients to address the full spectrum of BCP.

Eze BCP Features

  • Delivered by Certified Business Continuity Professionals who work exclusively with hedge fund and private equity firms
  • Industry-specific experience, knowledge and focus make our team pros at identifying a company’s potential exposures — our team knows the risks facing the investment management industry
  • Proven methodology to ensure your firm is prepared for the unexpected
  • Annual review of BCP documentation and updates to account for business changes
  • Employee training sessions and executive roundtables run by an Eze seasoned hedge fund business continuity consultant

Learn More about BCP

Learn more about Eze Castle’s business continuity planning service and how our certified BCP experts can prepare your firm for a disaster.

This guidebook is designed to help hedge fund managers of all sizes develop an understanding of both the BCP and DR planning processes.

Eze BCP Methodology

1. Risk Assessment

Our business continuity consultants will identify and prioritize potential business risks and disruptions based on severity and likelihood of occurrence. Key elements of Eze Castle’s Risk Assessment phase include:

  • Evaluation of the company’s risks and exposures
  • Assessment of the potential impact of various business disruption scenarios
  • Determination of the most likely threat scenarios
  • Assessment of telecommunication recovery options and communication plans
  • Prioritization of findings and development of a roadmap

2. Business Impact Analysis

Eze Castle’s hedge fund BCP experts will collect information on a wide range of areas from recovery assumptions and critical business processes to interdependencies and critical staff. Key elements of Eze Castle’s BIA phase include:

  • Determination of the maximum amount of downtime business processes can withstand
  • Development of recovery point objectives and recovery time objectives for critical functions (e.g. applications, systems, etc.)
  • Identification of critical business processes and workflows and the supporting applications
  • Outlining of internal and external dependencies
  • Determination of critical staff members as well as backups with similar skill sets

3. Strategy and Plan Development

Our certified business continuity planners will create department, division and site level plans for your business. Key elements of this phase include:

  • Synthesis of Risk Assessment and BIA findings
  • Development of plans for department, division and site level contingencies
  • Review of plans with key stakeholders to obtain executive sign-off on overall plan
  • Creation of offsite, secure web repository where the firm’s BCP plan is stored for easy access from virtually anywhere during an outage or disaster

4. Plan Testing, Training and Maintenance

Business continuity plans are living documents and must be updated annually to ensure they account for changes within the firm as well as any changes in risk scenarios. Key elements of this ongoing phase include:

  • Conducting of tabletop and simulation exercises to help ensure employees are effectively trained
  • Development of employee training sessions
  • Review of BCP, business impact analysis and risks annually by an Eze hedge fund business continuity consultant
  • Execution of the annual review process to guarantee new threats and business process changes are accurately represented in the BCP




The Business Continuity Institute #registered #business #names

#business continuity

#

What is the future of BC?

The BCI and PwC have been considering the future of business continuity and the challenges to us as professionals. The growing emphasis on resilience has led us to consider what the future holds, and we’d like to understand what you think too. Please do complete our short survey and share your thoughts. All respondents will be in with a chance of winning a £100 Amazon gift card.

New BCI Executive Director

The BCI is delighted to welcome David Thorp as its new Executive Director, taking over from Lorraine Darke who steps down at the end of the year in order to enjoy an early retirement after 12 years at the BCI. David is set to join the BCI on the 3rd October when he leaves his current role as Managing Director of the Security Institute. Read more here .

Salary Benchmarking Report

The BCI Salary Benchmarking Report is a global study of business continuity professionals, and an analysis of their remuneration to highlight variations between location, education, gender and industry. The report can be downloaded from the members’ area of the BCI website. If you are not a member, but would like to join as an Affiliate in order to gain access to the report, just click here .

The impact of Brexit

With the UK voting to leave the EU, is your organization prepared for Brexit? The BCI has published two papers to help you consider what steps you need to take to make your organization more resilient during this period of change. Download you free copy of ‘Horizon scanning post-Brexit: What should businesses prepare for? ‘ and ‘Brexit: Analysing the impact of change ‘ to give you some ideas to think about.

BCI World Conference

We believe we have created our best programme yet for the BCI World Conference, one for seasoned professionals and new, one that encompasses all of the current thinking, and one that includes keynotes, case studies, panel sessions, workshops and research. From ‘how to build organizational resilience’ to ‘cyber security’, from ‘getting buy-in’ to ‘building a response capability to deal with the threat of terrorism’, we have it all covered, see for yourself .

How To Guides

The BCI is pleased to present a new range of ‘How To Guides’ which can act as further study and reference resources. The six guides, each based on one of the stages of the BCM Lifecycle, are consistent with the current GPG and contain examples and advice which may be adapted to suit your working environment. The guides are available in the BCI Shop and BCI members are entitled to a substantial discount.

Continuity Magazine

The latest edition of Continuity Magazine has now hit the shelves – an edition packed full of news, research and opinion on the continuity and resilience industry. With articles on pandemics, GDPR, crisis management, BC metrics, disaster recovery, and resilience in the community, there is something for everyone. Download your FREE copy today.

Cyber Resilience Report

The BCI Cyber Resilience Report is an analysis of cyber security incidents experienced by organizations across the world, and how they respond to them. These types of incidents are not rare occurrences with two-thirds of organizations experiencing at least one during the previous year. The report, sponsored by Crises Control, can be downloaded for free by clicking here .





What is business continuance (business continuity)? Definition from #business #card #print

#business continuity

#

business continuance (business continuity)

Business continuance is a strategy for putting the processes and procedures in place that an organization requires to operate during and after a disaster. Business continuance plans seek to prevent mission-critical services from being interrupted and re-establish full operations as swiftly and smoothly as possible.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

You also agree that your personal information may be transferred and processed in the United States, and that you have read and agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy .

The first step in business continuance planning is to decide which of an organization’s functions are absolutely essential, and apportion budget for recovery accordingly. Although business continuance is important for any enterprise, it may not be practical for any but the largest to maintain full functioning throughout a disaster crisis. Once crucial components have been identified, the second step is to put failover mechanisms in place to ensure that operations can carry on with minimal interruption in the event of a disaster. Ideally, an organization maintains up-to-date copies of data in geographically dispersed locations so that data access can continue uninterrupted if one location is disabled.

Every business continuance action plan should include a disaster recovery plan that documents an organization’s planned strategies for post-failure procedures; a business resumption plan that documents how essential services at the crisis location will be restored; a business recovery plan that documents how to recover business functions at an alternate location; and a contingency plan that documents what actions should be carried out if operations cannot continue at the crisis center or alternate location.

Business continuance became an increasingly common area of concern since the September 2001 World Trade Center disaster, in which an unforeseen incident created a sudden and severe threat to crucial functions for a number of companies. Business continuance is sometimes referred to as business continuity or more recently, business resilience .

This was last updated in August 2016

Continue Reading About business continuance (business continuity)

Related Terms

Ceph Ceph is open source software providing scalable object-, block- and file-based storage under a unified system. Red Hat and SUSE. See complete definition petabyte (PB) A petabyte is a unit of data storage space consisting of 1,024 terabytes, or approximately 1 million gigabytes. The prefix ‘peta’. See complete definition RAM (random access memory) Random access memory is where the operating system, application programs and data in current use are kept in a computing device. See complete definition

Dig Deeper on Enterprise storage, planning and management





What is Business Continuity? #business #today

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity is often described as ‘just common sense’. It is about taking responsibility for your business and enabling it to stay on course whatever storms it is forced to weather. It is about “keeping calm and carrying on”!

BC is about building and improving resilience in your business; it’s about identifying your key products and services and the most urgent activities that underpin them and then, once that ‘analysis’ is complete, it is about devising plans and strategies that will enable you to continue your business operations and enable you to recover quickly and effectively from any type disruption whatever its size or cause. It gives you a solid framework to lean on in times of crisis and provides stability and security. In fact, embedding BC into your business is proven to bring business benefits.

Business Continuity (BC) is defined as the capability of the organization to continue delivery of products or services at acceptable predefined levels following a disruptive incident. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

Business Continuity Management (BCM) is defined as a holistic management process that identifies potential threats to an organization and the impacts to business operations those threats, if realized, might cause, and which provides a framework for building organizational resilience with the capability of an effective response that safeguards the interests of its key stakeholders, reputation, brand and value-creating activities. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

At the heart of good BC practice, sits the BCM Lifecycle.

The BCM Lifecycle shows the stages of activity that an organization moves through and repeats with the overall aim of improving organizational resilience. These stages are referred to as the Professional Practices and are made up of Management and Technical Practices.

Find out more about business continuity by downloading the GPG Lite for free, or why not take our eLearning Building Resilience course that will take you through the basics of making your organization more resilient in the face of an incident.

Watch a short four minute video to hear about the importance of Business Continuity Management:





What is business continuance (business continuity)? Definition from #small #business #grants

#business continuity

#

business continuance (business continuity)

Business continuance is a strategy for putting the processes and procedures in place that an organization requires to operate during and after a disaster. Business continuance plans seek to prevent mission-critical services from being interrupted and re-establish full operations as swiftly and smoothly as possible.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

You also agree that your personal information may be transferred and processed in the United States, and that you have read and agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy .

The first step in business continuance planning is to decide which of an organization’s functions are absolutely essential, and apportion budget for recovery accordingly. Although business continuance is important for any enterprise, it may not be practical for any but the largest to maintain full functioning throughout a disaster crisis. Once crucial components have been identified, the second step is to put failover mechanisms in place to ensure that operations can carry on with minimal interruption in the event of a disaster. Ideally, an organization maintains up-to-date copies of data in geographically dispersed locations so that data access can continue uninterrupted if one location is disabled.

Every business continuance action plan should include a disaster recovery plan that documents an organization’s planned strategies for post-failure procedures; a business resumption plan that documents how essential services at the crisis location will be restored; a business recovery plan that documents how to recover business functions at an alternate location; and a contingency plan that documents what actions should be carried out if operations cannot continue at the crisis center or alternate location.

Business continuance became an increasingly common area of concern since the September 2001 World Trade Center disaster, in which an unforeseen incident created a sudden and severe threat to crucial functions for a number of companies. Business continuance is sometimes referred to as business continuity or more recently, business resilience .

This was last updated in August 2016

Continue Reading About business continuance (business continuity)

Related Terms

Ceph Ceph is open source software providing scalable object-, block- and file-based storage under a unified system. Red Hat and SUSE. See complete definition petabyte (PB) A petabyte is a unit of data storage space consisting of 1,024 terabytes, or approximately 1 million gigabytes. The prefix ‘peta’. See complete definition RAM (random access memory) Random access memory is where the operating system, application programs and data in current use are kept in a computing device. See complete definition

Dig Deeper on Enterprise storage, planning and management





What is Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)? Definition from #fast #business

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR or BC/DR) are closely related practices that describe an organization’s preparation for unforeseen risks to continued operations. The trend of combining business continuity and disaster recovery into a single term has resulted from a growing recognition that both business executives and technology executives need to be collaborating closely instead of developing plans in isolation.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

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Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide #business

#business continuity plan

#

Sample business continuity plan template for SMBs: Free download and guide

For small- to medium-sized businesses (SMBs), the business continuity planning process contains several steps. These include: project initiation, risk assessment, business impact assessment, strategy development, business continuity plan development, business continuity plan testing and maintenance, emergency communications, awareness and training, and coordination with public authorities. This is comparable to the business continuity process found in larger organizations except for the fact that for SMBs, the business continuity planning process can be simplified, depending on the size and complexity of the organization.

For many SMBs, the above business continuity planning activities pose a formidable challenge, especially from the perspectives of time, money and resources. To make the process easier, SMBs have several options, such as business continuity planning tools and software, business continuity templates. checklists or consultants. Each of these options can create a plan and its associated elements, however, because of their simplicity, SMBs often use them to get something done quickly. And regrettably, after a plan has been developed, that’s the end of the process. Few SMBs invest in exercises to make sure their plans will work.

In this business continuity planning guide, we’ll try and simplify this process for SMBs. We’ll start off with a more or less standard sample business continuity plan template. Read this guide, and then download our free sample business continuity plan template for smaller businesses and you’ll be well on your way to developing a successful business continuity plan.

FREE DOWNLOAD: BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

To have develop a successful business continuity plan, we recommend the following steps:

  • Make sure you have the right information. Your business continuity plan doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate. A one-page plan with the right information can be more valuable than a voluminous document that nobody can use.
  • Go to www.ready.gov (part of the Federal emergency Management Agency site) and look at the emergency plan development information available at that site. The information at ready.gov can serve as an effective complement to the template we provide in this report.
  • Standards can provide a useful starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use: NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard), BSI BS 25999 (the British standard) and FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors).
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions.
  • Make it happen. Once the plan is complete, exercise it semiannually it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all departments and/or locations in your organization.

Next, we’ll examine the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  1. Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan (emergency notification contacts), so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  2. Revision control page: This page is located on the second page of the plan and it reflects your change management process.
  3. Purpose and scope: Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  4. Instructions for using the plan: Provide information about when and how the plan will be activated, including outage timeframes, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted.
  5. Policy information: This is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  6. Emergency response and management: Specify situations in which the plan and response procedures are to be activated.
  7. Plan review and maintenance: Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom.
  8. Checklists and flow diagrams: Assuming a situation has occurred, have steps identified to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  9. Notification of incident affecting the site: Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as soon as possible with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  10. Decide on course of action: This section addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company leadership.
  11. Business recovery phase: This section provides instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  12. Appendixes: Detailed appendixes are provided at the end of the template; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations, and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.

The process of developing a business continuity plan for SMBs is generally a straightforward process. The keys to success include defining step-by-step response and recovery procedures, validating these activities through tests, and keeping the plan up to date.

This was first published in October 2010





What is Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)? Definition from #loans #for

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR or BC/DR) are closely related practices that describe an organization’s preparation for unforeseen risks to continued operations. The trend of combining business continuity and disaster recovery into a single term has resulted from a growing recognition that both business executives and technology executives need to be collaborating closely instead of developing plans in isolation.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

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What is business continuance (business continuity)? Definition from #best #online #businesses

#business continuity

#

business continuance (business continuity)

Business continuance is a strategy for putting the processes and procedures in place that an organization requires to operate during and after a disaster. Business continuance plans seek to prevent mission-critical services from being interrupted and re-establish full operations as swiftly and smoothly as possible.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

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The first step in business continuance planning is to decide which of an organization’s functions are absolutely essential, and apportion budget for recovery accordingly. Although business continuance is important for any enterprise, it may not be practical for any but the largest to maintain full functioning throughout a disaster crisis. Once crucial components have been identified, the second step is to put failover mechanisms in place to ensure that operations can carry on with minimal interruption in the event of a disaster. Ideally, an organization maintains up-to-date copies of data in geographically dispersed locations so that data access can continue uninterrupted if one location is disabled.

Every business continuance action plan should include a disaster recovery plan that documents an organization’s planned strategies for post-failure procedures; a business resumption plan that documents how essential services at the crisis location will be restored; a business recovery plan that documents how to recover business functions at an alternate location; and a contingency plan that documents what actions should be carried out if operations cannot continue at the crisis center or alternate location.

Business continuance became an increasingly common area of concern since the September 2001 World Trade Center disaster, in which an unforeseen incident created a sudden and severe threat to crucial functions for a number of companies. Business continuance is sometimes referred to as business continuity or more recently, business resilience .

This was last updated in August 2016

Continue Reading About business continuance (business continuity)

Related Terms

Ceph Ceph is open source software providing scalable object-, block- and file-based storage under a unified system. Red Hat and SUSE. See complete definition petabyte (PB) A petabyte is a unit of data storage space consisting of 1,024 terabytes, or approximately 1 million gigabytes. The prefix ‘peta’. See complete definition RAM (random access memory) Random access memory is where the operating system, application programs and data in current use are kept in a computing device. See complete definition

Dig Deeper on Enterprise storage, planning and management





How to Create an Effective Business Continuity Plan #business #telephone #systems

#business continuity plan

#

How to Create an Effective Business Continuity Plan

We rarely get a head’s up that a disaster is ready to strike. Even with some lead time, though, multiple things can go wrong; every incident is unique and unfolds in unexpected ways.

This is where a business continuity plan comes into play. To give your organization the best shot at success during a disaster, you need to put a current, tested plan in the hands of all personnel responsible for carrying out any part of that plan. The lack of a plan doesn’t just mean your organization will take longer than necessary to recover from an event or incident. You could go out of business for good.

How Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery Plans Differ

Business continuity (BC) refers to maintaining business functions or quickly resuming them in the event of a major disruption, whether caused by a fire, flood, epidemic illness or a malicious attack across the Internet. A BC plan outlines procedures and instructions an organization must follow in the face of such disasters; it covers business processes, assets, human resources, business partners and more.

Many people think a disaster recovery plan is the same as a business continuity plan, but a DR plan focuses mainly on restoring IT infrastructure and operations after a crisis. It’s actually just one part of a complete business continuity plan, as a BC plan looks at the continuity of the entire organization. Do you have a way to get HR, manufacturing, and sales and support functionally up and running so the company can continue to make money right after a disaster?

For example, if the building that houses your customer service representatives is flattened by a tornado, do you know how those reps can handle customer calls? Will they work from home temporarily, or from an alternate location? Companies such as SunGard sell access to cubicles that include a desk, phone and computer in their recovery centers, along with server- and device-based DR services.

Note that a business impact analysis (BIA) is another part of a BC plan. A BIA identifies the impact of a sudden loss of business functions, usually quantified in a cost. Such analysis also helps you evaluate whether you should outsource non-core activities in your BCP, which can come with its own risks. The BIA essentially helps you look at your entire organization’s processes and determine which are most important.

Why Business Continuity Planning Matters

Whether you operate a small business or a large corporation, you strive to remain competitive. It’s vital to retain current customers while increasing your customer base — and there’s no better test of your capability to do so than right after an adverse event.

Because restoring IT is critical for most companies, numerous disaster recovery solutions are available. You can rely on IT to implement those solutions. But what about the rest of your business functions? Your company’s future depends on your people and processes. Being able to handle any incident effectively can have a positive effect on your company’s reputation and market value, and it can increase customer confidence.

First, Create a Business Continuity Plan

If your organization doesn’t have a BC plan in place, start by assessing your business processes, determining which areas are vulnerable, and the potential losses if those processes go down for a day, a few days or a week. This is essentially a (BIA).

Next, develop a plan. You can use any number of free templates available online or find an actual plan published by an organization similar to yours and modify it as needed.

There are six general steps involved in creating a business continuity plan:

  1. Identify the scope of the plan.
  2. Identify key business areas.
  3. Identify critical functions.
  4. Identify dependencies between various business areas and functions.
  5. Determine acceptable downtime for each critical function.
  6. Create a plan to maintain operations.

One common business continuity planning tool is a checklist that includes supplies and equipment, the location of data backups and backup sites, where the plan is available and who should have it, and contact information for emergency responders, key personnel and backup site providers.

Remember that the disaster recovery plan is part of the business continuity plan, so check with your IT department to ensure it has or is actively developing a DR plan.

As you create your plan, consider interviewing key personnel in organizations who have gone through a disaster successfully. People generally like to share “war stories” and the steps and techniques (or clever ideas) that saved the day. Their insights could prove incredibly valuable in helping you to craft a solid business continuity plan.

Then, Test Your Business Continuity Plan

You have to rigorously test a plan to know if it’s complete and will fulfill its intended purpose. Many organizations test a business continuity plan two to four times a year. The schedule depends on your type of organization, the amount of turnover of key personnel and the number of business processes and IT changes that have occurred since the last round of testing.

Common tests include table-top exercises, structured walk-throughs and simulations. Test teams are usually composed of the recovery coordinator and members from each functional unit.

A table-top exercise usually occurs in a conference room with the team poring over the plan, looking for gaps and ensuring that all business units are represented therein.

In a structured walk-through. each team member walks through his or components of the plan in detail to identify weaknesses. Often, the team works through the test with a specific disaster in mind. Some organizations incorporate drills and disaster role-playing into the structured walk-through. Any weaknesses should be corrected and an updated plan distributed to all pertinent staff.

It’s also a good idea to conduct a full emergency evacuation drill at least once a year. This type of test lets you determine if you need to make special arrangements to evacuate staff members who have physical limitations.

Lastly, disaster simulation testing can be quite involved and should be performed annually. For this test, create an environment that simulates an actual disaster, with all the equipment, supplies, and personnel (including business partners and vendors) who would be needed. The purpose of a simulation is to determine if you can carry out critical business functions during the event.

During each phase of business continuity plan testing, include some new employees on the test team. “Fresh eyes” might detect gaps or lapses of information that experienced team members could overlook.

Finally, Review and Improve Your Business Continuity Plan

Much effort goes into creating and initially testing a BC plan. Once that job is complete, some organizations let the plan sit while other, more critical tasks get attention. When this happens, plans go stale and are of no use when needed.

Technology evolves, and people come and go, so the plan needs to be updated, too. Bring key personnel together at least annually to review the plan and discuss any areas that must be modified.

Prior to the review, solicit feedback from staff to incorporate into the plan. Ask all departments or business units to review the plan, including branch locations or other remote units. If you’ve had the misfortune of facing a disaster and had to put the plan into action, be sure to incorporate lessons learned. Many organizations conduct a review in tandem with a table-top exercise or structured walk-through.

How to Ensure Business Continuity Plan Support, Awareness

One way to ensure your plan is not successful is to adopt a casual attitude toward its importance. Every business continuity plan must be supported from the top down. That means senior management must be represented when creating and updating the plan; no one can delegate that responsibility to subordinates. In addition, the plan is likely to remain fresh and viable if senior management makes it a priority by dedicating time for adequate review and testing.

Management is also key to promoting user awareness. If employees don’t know about the plan, how will they be able to react appropriately when every minute counts? Although plan distribution and training can be conducted by business unit managers or HR staff, have someone from the top kick off training and punctuate its significance. It’ll have a greater impact on all employees, giving the plan more credibility and urgency.

Follow everything from CIO





What is Business Continuity? #business #images

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity is often described as ‘just common sense’. It is about taking responsibility for your business and enabling it to stay on course whatever storms it is forced to weather. It is about “keeping calm and carrying on”!

BC is about building and improving resilience in your business; it’s about identifying your key products and services and the most urgent activities that underpin them and then, once that ‘analysis’ is complete, it is about devising plans and strategies that will enable you to continue your business operations and enable you to recover quickly and effectively from any type disruption whatever its size or cause. It gives you a solid framework to lean on in times of crisis and provides stability and security. In fact, embedding BC into your business is proven to bring business benefits.

Business Continuity (BC) is defined as the capability of the organization to continue delivery of products or services at acceptable predefined levels following a disruptive incident. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

Business Continuity Management (BCM) is defined as a holistic management process that identifies potential threats to an organization and the impacts to business operations those threats, if realized, might cause, and which provides a framework for building organizational resilience with the capability of an effective response that safeguards the interests of its key stakeholders, reputation, brand and value-creating activities. (Source: ISO 22301:2012)

At the heart of good BC practice, sits the BCM Lifecycle.

The BCM Lifecycle shows the stages of activity that an organization moves through and repeats with the overall aim of improving organizational resilience. These stages are referred to as the Professional Practices and are made up of Management and Technical Practices.

Find out more about business continuity by downloading the GPG Lite for free, or why not take our eLearning Building Resilience course that will take you through the basics of making your organization more resilient in the face of an incident.

Watch a short four minute video to hear about the importance of Business Continuity Management:





What is business continuance (business continuity)? Definition from #business #plan #sample

#business continuity

#

business continuance (business continuity)

Business continuance is a strategy for putting the processes and procedures in place that an organization requires to operate during and after a disaster. Business continuance plans seek to prevent mission-critical services from being interrupted and re-establish full operations as swiftly and smoothly as possible.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

You also agree that your personal information may be transferred and processed in the United States, and that you have read and agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy .

The first step in business continuance planning is to decide which of an organization’s functions are absolutely essential, and apportion budget for recovery accordingly. Although business continuance is important for any enterprise, it may not be practical for any but the largest to maintain full functioning throughout a disaster crisis. Once crucial components have been identified, the second step is to put failover mechanisms in place to ensure that operations can carry on with minimal interruption in the event of a disaster. Ideally, an organization maintains up-to-date copies of data in geographically dispersed locations so that data access can continue uninterrupted if one location is disabled.

Every business continuance action plan should include a disaster recovery plan that documents an organization’s planned strategies for post-failure procedures; a business resumption plan that documents how essential services at the crisis location will be restored; a business recovery plan that documents how to recover business functions at an alternate location; and a contingency plan that documents what actions should be carried out if operations cannot continue at the crisis center or alternate location.

Business continuance became an increasingly common area of concern since the September 2001 World Trade Center disaster, in which an unforeseen incident created a sudden and severe threat to crucial functions for a number of companies. Business continuance is sometimes referred to as business continuity or more recently, business resilience .

This was last updated in August 2016

Continue Reading About business continuance (business continuity)

Related Terms

Ceph Ceph is open source software providing scalable object-, block- and file-based storage under a unified system. Red Hat and SUSE. See complete definition petabyte (PB) A petabyte is a unit of data storage space consisting of 1,024 terabytes, or approximately 1 million gigabytes. The prefix ‘peta’. See complete definition RAM (random access memory) Random access memory is where the operating system, application programs and data in current use are kept in a computing device. See complete definition

Dig Deeper on Enterprise storage, planning and management





Business Continuity Planning (BCP) Definition #small #business #resources

#business continuity plan

#

Business Continuity Planning – BCP

What is the ‘Business Continuity Planning – BCP’

The business continuity planning (BCP) is the creation of a strategy through the recognition of threats and risks facing a company, with an eye to ensure that personnel and assets are protected and able to function in the event of a disaster. Business continuity planning (BCP) involves defining potential risks, determining how those risks will affect operations, implementing safeguards and procedures designed to mitigate those risks, testing those procedures to ensure that they work, and periodically reviewing the process to make sure that it is up to date.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Business Continuity Planning – BCP’

Businesses can face a host of disasters that range from minor to catastrophic. BCP typically will help a company to continue operating in the case of many disasters, such as fires, but may not be as effective if a large portion of the population is affected, such as in the case of a disease outbreak. One example of BCP would be a finance company based in a major city backing up its computer and client files offsite, so that if something would happen to the corporate office, satellite offices would still have access to important information.





What is Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)? Definition from #sacramento #business

#business continuity

#

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR)

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR or BC/DR) are closely related practices that describe an organization’s preparation for unforeseen risks to continued operations. The trend of combining business continuity and disaster recovery into a single term has resulted from a growing recognition that both business executives and technology executives need to be collaborating closely instead of developing plans in isolation.

Download this free guide

Letters from the Editor: 2016 State of Storage

Rich Castagna – the VP of Editorial, Storage – shares his candid, expert, and often very funny view on today’s storage market. In these six “Letters from the Editor,” originally featured in our monthly Storage magazine, Rich covers topics such as flash, data storage, SDS, storage hardware, data protection, convergence, and more.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

You also agree that your personal information may be transferred and processed in the United States, and that you have read and agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy .





What is business continuity management (BCM)? Definition from #business #loans #calculator

#business continuity

#

business continuity management (BCM)

Business continuity management (BCM) is a framework for identifying an organization’s risk of exposure to internal and external threats.

The goal of BCM is to provide the organization with the ability to effectively respond to threats such as natural disasters or data breaches and protect the business interests of the organization. BCM includes disaster recovery. business recovery, crisis management, incident management, emergency management and contingency planning .

Download this free guide

Download 9 FREE Strategic Planning Templates that your Peers Already Use

Having a clear-cut IT strategy is key establishing a competitive advantage over any competition. It can be the difference maker between a business’ success and its failure. Reach your business goals and stay organized by downloading this FREE e-guide which includes 9 templates already in use by major organizations such as NASA and Brown University.

By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact TechTarget at 275 Grove Street, Newton, MA.

You also agree that your personal information may be transferred and processed in the United States, and that you have read and agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy .

According to ISO 22301. a business continuity management system emphasizes the importance of:

  • Understanding continuity and preparedness needs, as well as the necessity for establishing business continuity management policy and objectives.
  • Implementing and operating controls and measures for managing an organization’s overall continuity risks.
  • Monitoring and reviewing the performance and effectiveness of the business continuity management system.
  • Continual improvement based on objective measurements.




The Business Continuity Institute #sba #financing

#business continuity

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What is the future of BC?

The BCI and PwC have been considering the future of business continuity and the challenges to us as professionals. The growing emphasis on resilience has led us to consider what the future holds, and we’d like to understand what you think too. Please do complete our short survey and share your thoughts. All respondents will be in with a chance of winning a £100 Amazon gift card.

New BCI Executive Director

The BCI is delighted to welcome David Thorp as its new Executive Director, taking over from Lorraine Darke who steps down at the end of the year in order to enjoy an early retirement after 12 years at the BCI. David is set to join the BCI on the 3rd October when he leaves his current role as Managing Director of the Security Institute. Read more here .

Salary Benchmarking Report

The BCI Salary Benchmarking Report is a global study of business continuity professionals, and an analysis of their remuneration to highlight variations between location, education, gender and industry. The report can be downloaded from the members’ area of the BCI website. If you are not a member, but would like to join as an Affiliate in order to gain access to the report, just click here .

The impact of Brexit

With the UK voting to leave the EU, is your organization prepared for Brexit? The BCI has published two papers to help you consider what steps you need to take to make your organization more resilient during this period of change. Download you free copy of ‘Horizon scanning post-Brexit: What should businesses prepare for? ‘ and ‘Brexit: Analysing the impact of change ‘ to give you some ideas to think about.

BCI World Conference

We believe we have created our best programme yet for the BCI World Conference, one for seasoned professionals and new, one that encompasses all of the current thinking, and one that includes keynotes, case studies, panel sessions, workshops and research. From ‘how to build organizational resilience’ to ‘cyber security’, from ‘getting buy-in’ to ‘building a response capability to deal with the threat of terrorism’, we have it all covered, see for yourself .

How To Guides

The BCI is pleased to present a new range of ‘How To Guides’ which can act as further study and reference resources. The six guides, each based on one of the stages of the BCM Lifecycle, are consistent with the current GPG and contain examples and advice which may be adapted to suit your working environment. The guides are available in the BCI Shop and BCI members are entitled to a substantial discount.

Continuity Magazine

The latest edition of Continuity Magazine has now hit the shelves – an edition packed full of news, research and opinion on the continuity and resilience industry. With articles on pandemics, GDPR, crisis management, BC metrics, disaster recovery, and resilience in the community, there is something for everyone. Download your FREE copy today.

Cyber Resilience Report

The BCI Cyber Resilience Report is an analysis of cyber security incidents experienced by organizations across the world, and how they respond to them. These types of incidents are not rare occurrences with two-thirds of organizations experiencing at least one during the previous year. The report, sponsored by Crises Control, can be downloaded for free by clicking here .





Business Continuity Planning for Hedge Funds and Investment Firms #business #plan #samples

#business continuity plan

#

Business Continuity

Eze Business Continuity Planning

Hedge funds and private equity firms firms must react swiftly, methodically and successfully when confronted with unexpected business disruptions or else risk significant financial loss. This level of response requires extensive business continuity planning to ensure all aspects of a firm’s business are evaluated and protected.

Effective Business Continuity Planning (BCP) can help minimize financial loss and the negative effects of disruptions on an investment firm’s strategic plans, market position, operations, and reputation.

Eze Castle’s Business Continuity Planning Services (Eze BCP) extend beyond technology to focus on critical operations and processes that hedge funds or investment firms must have available if a disaster strikes. Our Eze BCP consultants are certified experts in business continuity planning and possess deep knowledge of the unique operations of financial services firms.

This combined expertise means a client gains a custom, comprehensive BCP plan developed and managed by professionals that understand the client’s business. And our hedge fund business continuity consultants work with clients to address the full spectrum of BCP.

Eze BCP Features

  • Delivered by Certified Business Continuity Professionals who work exclusively with hedge fund and private equity firms
  • Industry-specific experience, knowledge and focus make our team pros at identifying a company’s potential exposures — our team knows the risks facing the investment management industry
  • Proven methodology to ensure your firm is prepared for the unexpected
  • Annual review of BCP documentation and updates to account for business changes
  • Employee training sessions and executive roundtables run by an Eze seasoned hedge fund business continuity consultant

Learn More about BCP

Learn more about Eze Castle’s business continuity planning service and how our certified BCP experts can prepare your firm for a disaster.

This guidebook is designed to help hedge fund managers of all sizes develop an understanding of both the BCP and DR planning processes.

Eze BCP Methodology

1. Risk Assessment

Our business continuity consultants will identify and prioritize potential business risks and disruptions based on severity and likelihood of occurrence. Key elements of Eze Castle’s Risk Assessment phase include:

  • Evaluation of the company’s risks and exposures
  • Assessment of the potential impact of various business disruption scenarios
  • Determination of the most likely threat scenarios
  • Assessment of telecommunication recovery options and communication plans
  • Prioritization of findings and development of a roadmap

2. Business Impact Analysis

Eze Castle’s hedge fund BCP experts will collect information on a wide range of areas from recovery assumptions and critical business processes to interdependencies and critical staff. Key elements of Eze Castle’s BIA phase include:

  • Determination of the maximum amount of downtime business processes can withstand
  • Development of recovery point objectives and recovery time objectives for critical functions (e.g. applications, systems, etc.)
  • Identification of critical business processes and workflows and the supporting applications
  • Outlining of internal and external dependencies
  • Determination of critical staff members as well as backups with similar skill sets

3. Strategy and Plan Development

Our certified business continuity planners will create department, division and site level plans for your business. Key elements of this phase include:

  • Synthesis of Risk Assessment and BIA findings
  • Development of plans for department, division and site level contingencies
  • Review of plans with key stakeholders to obtain executive sign-off on overall plan
  • Creation of offsite, secure web repository where the firm’s BCP plan is stored for easy access from virtually anywhere during an outage or disaster

4. Plan Testing, Training and Maintenance

Business continuity plans are living documents and must be updated annually to ensure they account for changes within the firm as well as any changes in risk scenarios. Key elements of this ongoing phase include:

  • Conducting of tabletop and simulation exercises to help ensure employees are effectively trained
  • Development of employee training sessions
  • Review of BCP, business impact analysis and risks annually by an Eze hedge fund business continuity consultant
  • Execution of the annual review process to guarantee new threats and business process changes are accurately represented in the BCP