Research Databases – Magazine – Newspaper Articles, cincinnati business courier.#Cincinnati #business #courier

Research Databases Magazine Newspaper Articles

If you re connecting from home, work, or school, you will need a valid library card and PIN. Resources marked with Cincinnati business courierare only available in Library agencies.

Cincinnati Business Courier Cincinnati business courier Includes current issues of The Cincinnati Business Courier and archives back to 1996. Also offers the Book of Lists. Consumer Reports (EBSCO/MasterFile Premier) Consumer Reports is an independent and nonprofit organization that provides product reviews on cars, appliances, electronics and more. Access full-text articles (1991 to present) from Consumer Reports through EBSCO/MasterFile Premier. MasterFile Premier Access full-text information from thousands of general reference publications covering virtually every subject area of general interest. Also includes full-text reference book, biographies, primary source documents, and an image collection of photographs, maps, and flags. National Geographic Magazine Archive (1888-1994) Every page and photograph from the official journal of the National Geographic Society. New York Times Online Through the Library’s “Group Pass” account with the New York Times, Library cardholders can enjoy free and unlimited access to news stories, multimedia content, and special features on the New York Times website. Access is free but first-time users will need to create an account with the New York Times. See our NYT Group Pass webpage for instructions on getting started. NewsBank Full-text articles from the following regional newspapers: the Cincinnati Post (1990-2007), Columbus Dispatch, Toledo Blade, Cleveland Plain Dealer, and the Dayton Daily News. Also includes access to Business NewsBank. NewsBank: Cincinnati Post (1882-1946) This fully searchable online archive captures local history in the late 19th and early 20th centuries articles from the Cincinnati Post . Newspaper Source Newspaper Source provides cover-to-cover full text for more than 40 (U.S.) & international newspapers. The database also contains selective full text for 389 regional (U.S.) newspapers. In addition, full text television & radio news transcripts are also provided. Nineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers Access over 28 million articles of primary source newspaper content from the 19th century, featuring full-text content and images from numerous newspapers from a range of urban and rural regions throughout the U.S. ProQuest Collection of databases that offer users access to full-text articles from thousands of magazines and newspapers, including The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal . ProQuest Digital Microfilm Access full-image, in-context newspaper content from the Cincinnati Enquirer (2010-present). This is a true extension of the traditional microfilm experience, providing full images and home access. ProQuest Digitized Newspapers: The New York Times Recent The full-page images of this digitized newspaper provide genealogists, researchers and scholars with cover-to-cover access to recent newspaper content. Every page is full-text searchable. Coverage: 2008 – recent (3-month embargo). ProQuest Historical Newspapers Full-text articles from the backfile of nineteen newspapers including The Christian Science Monitor , The Los Angeles Times , the Louisville Courier Journal , The Nashville Tennessean , the Toronto Star , and The Washington Post . ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Dayton Daily News (1898-1922) Full-text articles from the backfile of The Dayton Daily News . ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Indianapolis Star (1903-1922) Full-text articles from the backfile of the Indianapolis Star ProQuest Historical Newspapers: New York Times Full-text and full-image articles for the complete backfile (1851 2009) of the New York Times . Digital reproductions include news stories, editorials, photographs, graphics, obituaries, legal notices, and advertisements. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The Cincinnati Enquirer (1841-2009) Full-text articles from the backfile of The Cincinnati Enquirer . Please note: The year 1885 is incomplete due to damaged microfilm. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The Nashville Tennessean (1812-1922) Full-text articles from the backfile of The Nashville Tennessean . ProQuest: Cincinnati Enquirer (1999-current) Access full-text articles from the Cincinnati Enquirer. Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County: Electronic Journals The E-Journal Portal is a comprehensive list of full text journals that are available from our multiple electronic resource databases. Browse by title or search by subject category. Also includes our historical newspapers.





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Research Databases – Magazine – Newspaper Articles, cincinnati business courier.#Cincinnati #business #courier

Research Databases Magazine Newspaper Articles

If you re connecting from home, work, or school, you will need a valid library card and PIN. Resources marked with Cincinnati business courierare only available in Library agencies.

Cincinnati Business Courier Cincinnati business courier Includes current issues of The Cincinnati Business Courier and archives back to 1996. Also offers the Book of Lists. Consumer Reports (EBSCO/MasterFile Premier) Consumer Reports is an independent and nonprofit organization that provides product reviews on cars, appliances, electronics and more. Access full-text articles (1991 to present) from Consumer Reports through EBSCO/MasterFile Premier. MasterFile Premier Access full-text information from thousands of general reference publications covering virtually every subject area of general interest. Also includes full-text reference book, biographies, primary source documents, and an image collection of photographs, maps, and flags. National Geographic Magazine Archive (1888-1994) Every page and photograph from the official journal of the National Geographic Society. New York Times Online Through the Library’s “Group Pass” account with the New York Times, Library cardholders can enjoy free and unlimited access to news stories, multimedia content, and special features on the New York Times website. Access is free but first-time users will need to create an account with the New York Times. See our NYT Group Pass webpage for instructions on getting started. NewsBank Full-text articles from the following regional newspapers: the Cincinnati Post (1990-2007), Columbus Dispatch, Toledo Blade, Cleveland Plain Dealer, and the Dayton Daily News. Also includes access to Business NewsBank. NewsBank: Cincinnati Post (1882-1946) This fully searchable online archive captures local history in the late 19th and early 20th centuries articles from the Cincinnati Post . Newspaper Source Newspaper Source provides cover-to-cover full text for more than 40 (U.S.) & international newspapers. The database also contains selective full text for 389 regional (U.S.) newspapers. In addition, full text television & radio news transcripts are also provided. Nineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers Access over 28 million articles of primary source newspaper content from the 19th century, featuring full-text content and images from numerous newspapers from a range of urban and rural regions throughout the U.S. ProQuest Collection of databases that offer users access to full-text articles from thousands of magazines and newspapers, including The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal . ProQuest Digital Microfilm Access full-image, in-context newspaper content from the Cincinnati Enquirer (2010-present). This is a true extension of the traditional microfilm experience, providing full images and home access. ProQuest Digitized Newspapers: The New York Times Recent The full-page images of this digitized newspaper provide genealogists, researchers and scholars with cover-to-cover access to recent newspaper content. Every page is full-text searchable. Coverage: 2008 – recent (3-month embargo). ProQuest Historical Newspapers Full-text articles from the backfile of nineteen newspapers including The Christian Science Monitor , The Los Angeles Times , the Louisville Courier Journal , The Nashville Tennessean , the Toronto Star , and The Washington Post . ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Dayton Daily News (1898-1922) Full-text articles from the backfile of The Dayton Daily News . ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Indianapolis Star (1903-1922) Full-text articles from the backfile of the Indianapolis Star ProQuest Historical Newspapers: New York Times Full-text and full-image articles for the complete backfile (1851 2009) of the New York Times . Digital reproductions include news stories, editorials, photographs, graphics, obituaries, legal notices, and advertisements. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The Cincinnati Enquirer (1841-2009) Full-text articles from the backfile of The Cincinnati Enquirer . Please note: The year 1885 is incomplete due to damaged microfilm. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The Nashville Tennessean (1812-1922) Full-text articles from the backfile of The Nashville Tennessean . ProQuest: Cincinnati Enquirer (1999-current) Access full-text articles from the Cincinnati Enquirer. Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County: Electronic Journals The E-Journal Portal is a comprehensive list of full text journals that are available from our multiple electronic resource databases. Browse by title or search by subject category. Also includes our historical newspapers.





Jamie Smith, Publisher, Cincinnati Business Courier #business #loans #calculator

#cincinnati business courier

#

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

LOCATION: Continental Room
MENU: Iceberg wedge with tomatoes, bleu cheese, bleu cheese dressing; rigatoni pasta with Italian sausage, peppers, parmesan spicy tomato sauce; and vanilla cheesecake with spiced blackberry jam.
ALTERNATE MENU: Veg ravioli with spicy tomato sauce parmesan OR grilled chicken with mixed greens, grapes, toasted almonds, red onions, lemon herb dressing.

Jamie Smith currently is the Publisher/Cincinnati Market President of the Business Courier and has held that position since February 2011. He was previously Director of Advertising with the Business Courier since 2003. Jamie has over 25 years of media experience. After graduating from the University of Kentucky with a degree in marketing was an Account Executive for The Recorder Newspapers of Northern Kentucky. then spent 11 years in sales management with Gannett s Cincinnati Enquirer. Jamie moved to Clifton Heights after living the last 27 years in the Northern Kentucky neighborhood of Ft. Thomas. He has three children: Michael (26) doing his medical residency in Washington, D.C. Tyler (23) pursuing his graduate degree in architecture at the University of Michigan, and Mackenzie (18) a freshman at St. Louis University. Jamie has been very active with his children, coaching soccer and serving on many school committees. Jamie serves on the Board of Directors for the Cincinnati s Flying Pig Marathon serving as Treasurer. He also sits on the Board of Directors for the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and Hoxworth Blood Center/U.C. and sits on the Board of Advisors for the RediCincinnati and the Goering Center for Family and Private Business. Jamie was a 2010 graduate of the Leadership Development program sponsored by the Courier s parent company American City Business Journals and a 2013 graduate of Leadership Cincinnati Class 36 sponsored by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber.

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CINCINNATI BUSINESS COURIER – One of Cincinnati’s largest private companies adding 100

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#

One of Cincinnati’s largest private companies adding 100 jobs

The Cincinnati Business Courier recently published an article about TP Mechanical. The piece highlights the addition of a third shift and the expansion of the apprenticeship program that will add 100 jobs in the next couple of years.

Read the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website. You must be a subscriber to view the full content.

HEADQUARTERS

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Cincinnati, Ohio 45240
O: 513-851-8881

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August 27, 2016 – TP Mechanical has worked 2,005,251 hours without a lost-time accident.

BLOG

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN Eye injuries are the leading cause of blindness in children, and most eye injuries incurred by those ages 11 to 14 happen while they are playing sports. Every 13 minutes, an emergency room in the United States treats a sports-related eye injury. Of the estimated 2 million [ ]

View all of our blog articles here .





Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under

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Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.





Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty

#cincinnati business courier

#

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

Other Recent News





Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty

#cincinnati business courier

#

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

Other Recent News





Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty

#cincinnati business courier

#

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

Other Recent News





Jamie Smith, Publisher, Cincinnati Business Courier #business #consulting

#cincinnati business courier

#

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

LOCATION: Continental Room
MENU: Iceberg wedge with tomatoes, bleu cheese, bleu cheese dressing; rigatoni pasta with Italian sausage, peppers, parmesan spicy tomato sauce; and vanilla cheesecake with spiced blackberry jam.
ALTERNATE MENU: Veg ravioli with spicy tomato sauce parmesan OR grilled chicken with mixed greens, grapes, toasted almonds, red onions, lemon herb dressing.

Jamie Smith currently is the Publisher/Cincinnati Market President of the Business Courier and has held that position since February 2011. He was previously Director of Advertising with the Business Courier since 2003. Jamie has over 25 years of media experience. After graduating from the University of Kentucky with a degree in marketing was an Account Executive for The Recorder Newspapers of Northern Kentucky. then spent 11 years in sales management with Gannett s Cincinnati Enquirer. Jamie moved to Clifton Heights after living the last 27 years in the Northern Kentucky neighborhood of Ft. Thomas. He has three children: Michael (26) doing his medical residency in Washington, D.C. Tyler (23) pursuing his graduate degree in architecture at the University of Michigan, and Mackenzie (18) a freshman at St. Louis University. Jamie has been very active with his children, coaching soccer and serving on many school committees. Jamie serves on the Board of Directors for the Cincinnati s Flying Pig Marathon serving as Treasurer. He also sits on the Board of Directors for the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and Hoxworth Blood Center/U.C. and sits on the Board of Advisors for the RediCincinnati and the Goering Center for Family and Private Business. Jamie was a 2010 graduate of the Leadership Development program sponsored by the Courier s parent company American City Business Journals and a 2013 graduate of Leadership Cincinnati Class 36 sponsored by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber.

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Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article – Brilliant Advice™

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Posts

Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article

EXCLUSIVE. Cincinnati money manager Cern Basher leaves firm he helped found to start new company.

Cern Basher has left the investment advisory firm he co-founded nearly 16 years ago to start a new one.

Basher left Madison Wealth Management in January, but he didn’t have much time off. Last week, he launched Brilliant Advice, a Kenwood-based investment advisory firm with a couple of twists on the typical formula.

Basher was one of six owners at Madison, which manages more than $400 million and is also located on Montgomery Road in Kenwood, when he decided to depart.

“I had some ideas and a vision of how I wanted to work with clients, and it didn’t really mesh with my partners,” Basher said. “So I made a decision to leave Madison.”

Among the things that make Basher’s firm different from most: It’s completely open about the fees it charges, it doesn’t negotiate fees and they’re significantly lower than what most firms charge.

“All wealth managers say they can negotiate fees,” Basher told me. “But the challenge as a client is it’s a bit like being on an airplane. You’re not sure how much the person sitting next to you paid, and you don’t want to be the one who paid the most. It just doesn’t seem fair to me. The fact we don’t negotiate is actually better for you as a client. You know that it’s fair and everyone is paying equal.

The homepage of Brilliant’s website has a prominent feature allowing potential clients to compare fees. It not only shows how much they’ll pay but how much they’ll save compared to a typical adviser.

Brilliant charges no more than 0.9 percent of assets. Most advisers charge 1 percent unless accounts have an enormous amount of assets. And Brilliant’s percentage rate drops as the account gets bigger. Basher also caps the fee at $50,000 a year, regardless of account size. Any account above $12.3 million is charged the same $50,000 annual fee.

Basher also will work closely with clients to develop a plan. That probably doesn’t sound different from most advisers, but he takes it to another level. He’ll actually develop a financial plan during a meeting with a client rather than gathering information and coming back later with a strategy.

“I want them to sit down with me as we do it,” Basher said. “With a typical plan, the client doesn’t know what you considered but didn’t use.”

He also uses technology to give clients constant access to their financial plan and current investment reports. There s no need for them to wait for a quarterly report.

In addition to investment management and financial planning, he’s offering what he calls lifestyle design. That’s a process that helps clients decide what’s most important to them and how they want to live after retirement. Then, Basher can tailor a financial plan to meet those lifestyle goals.

“We break it down into needs, wants and wishes,” he said. “Wishes tend to be the things people care the most about. Wouldn’t it be nice to make those wishes come true?”

About the company name: It’s not meant to tout that Basher’s advice is outstanding. He pointed out that brilliant means distinctive, excellent, and light and transparent. He’s striving for all of those.

Basher brought over two others from Madison: Holly Purcell. a portfolio manager, and Danya Karram. a financial planner.

He has a two-year non-solicitation agreement with Madison, so he can’t contact former clients to get them to move, but they can contact him and make that choice on their own.

“I’m sure former clients are interested, and we’ll also work with anyone else who’s interested,” Basher said.

Click here to read the full article about Cern Basher and Brilliant Advice in PDF format.

Below is a link to the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website:





Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article – Brilliant Advice™

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#

Posts

Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article

EXCLUSIVE. Cincinnati money manager Cern Basher leaves firm he helped found to start new company.

Cern Basher has left the investment advisory firm he co-founded nearly 16 years ago to start a new one.

Basher left Madison Wealth Management in January, but he didn’t have much time off. Last week, he launched Brilliant Advice, a Kenwood-based investment advisory firm with a couple of twists on the typical formula.

Basher was one of six owners at Madison, which manages more than $400 million and is also located on Montgomery Road in Kenwood, when he decided to depart.

“I had some ideas and a vision of how I wanted to work with clients, and it didn’t really mesh with my partners,” Basher said. “So I made a decision to leave Madison.”

Among the things that make Basher’s firm different from most: It’s completely open about the fees it charges, it doesn’t negotiate fees and they’re significantly lower than what most firms charge.

“All wealth managers say they can negotiate fees,” Basher told me. “But the challenge as a client is it’s a bit like being on an airplane. You’re not sure how much the person sitting next to you paid, and you don’t want to be the one who paid the most. It just doesn’t seem fair to me. The fact we don’t negotiate is actually better for you as a client. You know that it’s fair and everyone is paying equal.

The homepage of Brilliant’s website has a prominent feature allowing potential clients to compare fees. It not only shows how much they’ll pay but how much they’ll save compared to a typical adviser.

Brilliant charges no more than 0.9 percent of assets. Most advisers charge 1 percent unless accounts have an enormous amount of assets. And Brilliant’s percentage rate drops as the account gets bigger. Basher also caps the fee at $50,000 a year, regardless of account size. Any account above $12.3 million is charged the same $50,000 annual fee.

Basher also will work closely with clients to develop a plan. That probably doesn’t sound different from most advisers, but he takes it to another level. He’ll actually develop a financial plan during a meeting with a client rather than gathering information and coming back later with a strategy.

“I want them to sit down with me as we do it,” Basher said. “With a typical plan, the client doesn’t know what you considered but didn’t use.”

He also uses technology to give clients constant access to their financial plan and current investment reports. There s no need for them to wait for a quarterly report.

In addition to investment management and financial planning, he’s offering what he calls lifestyle design. That’s a process that helps clients decide what’s most important to them and how they want to live after retirement. Then, Basher can tailor a financial plan to meet those lifestyle goals.

“We break it down into needs, wants and wishes,” he said. “Wishes tend to be the things people care the most about. Wouldn’t it be nice to make those wishes come true?”

About the company name: It’s not meant to tout that Basher’s advice is outstanding. He pointed out that brilliant means distinctive, excellent, and light and transparent. He’s striving for all of those.

Basher brought over two others from Madison: Holly Purcell. a portfolio manager, and Danya Karram. a financial planner.

He has a two-year non-solicitation agreement with Madison, so he can’t contact former clients to get them to move, but they can contact him and make that choice on their own.

“I’m sure former clients are interested, and we’ll also work with anyone else who’s interested,” Basher said.

Click here to read the full article about Cern Basher and Brilliant Advice in PDF format.

Below is a link to the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website:





Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under

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#

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.





Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty

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#

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

Other Recent News





CINCINNATI BUSINESS COURIER – One of Cincinnati’s largest private companies adding 100

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One of Cincinnati’s largest private companies adding 100 jobs

The Cincinnati Business Courier recently published an article about TP Mechanical. The piece highlights the addition of a third shift and the expansion of the apprenticeship program that will add 100 jobs in the next couple of years.

Read the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website. You must be a subscriber to view the full content.

HEADQUARTERS

1500 Kemper Meadow Drive
Cincinnati, Ohio 45240
O: 513-851-8881

SAFE HOURS

August 27, 2016 – TP Mechanical has worked 2,005,251 hours without a lost-time accident.

BLOG

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN Eye injuries are the leading cause of blindness in children, and most eye injuries incurred by those ages 11 to 14 happen while they are playing sports. Every 13 minutes, an emergency room in the United States treats a sports-related eye injury. Of the estimated 2 million [ ]

View all of our blog articles here .





Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under

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Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.





Jamie Smith, Publisher, Cincinnati Business Courier #bakery #business #plan

#cincinnati business courier

#

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

LOCATION: Continental Room
MENU: Iceberg wedge with tomatoes, bleu cheese, bleu cheese dressing; rigatoni pasta with Italian sausage, peppers, parmesan spicy tomato sauce; and vanilla cheesecake with spiced blackberry jam.
ALTERNATE MENU: Veg ravioli with spicy tomato sauce parmesan OR grilled chicken with mixed greens, grapes, toasted almonds, red onions, lemon herb dressing.

Jamie Smith currently is the Publisher/Cincinnati Market President of the Business Courier and has held that position since February 2011. He was previously Director of Advertising with the Business Courier since 2003. Jamie has over 25 years of media experience. After graduating from the University of Kentucky with a degree in marketing was an Account Executive for The Recorder Newspapers of Northern Kentucky. then spent 11 years in sales management with Gannett s Cincinnati Enquirer. Jamie moved to Clifton Heights after living the last 27 years in the Northern Kentucky neighborhood of Ft. Thomas. He has three children: Michael (26) doing his medical residency in Washington, D.C. Tyler (23) pursuing his graduate degree in architecture at the University of Michigan, and Mackenzie (18) a freshman at St. Louis University. Jamie has been very active with his children, coaching soccer and serving on many school committees. Jamie serves on the Board of Directors for the Cincinnati s Flying Pig Marathon serving as Treasurer. He also sits on the Board of Directors for the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and Hoxworth Blood Center/U.C. and sits on the Board of Advisors for the RediCincinnati and the Goering Center for Family and Private Business. Jamie was a 2010 graduate of the Leadership Development program sponsored by the Courier s parent company American City Business Journals and a 2013 graduate of Leadership Cincinnati Class 36 sponsored by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber.

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Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty

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#

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

Other Recent News





Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under

#cincinnati business courier

#

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.





Jamie Smith, Publisher, Cincinnati Business Courier #franchise #businesses

#cincinnati business courier

#

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

LOCATION: Continental Room
MENU: Iceberg wedge with tomatoes, bleu cheese, bleu cheese dressing; rigatoni pasta with Italian sausage, peppers, parmesan spicy tomato sauce; and vanilla cheesecake with spiced blackberry jam.
ALTERNATE MENU: Veg ravioli with spicy tomato sauce parmesan OR grilled chicken with mixed greens, grapes, toasted almonds, red onions, lemon herb dressing.

Jamie Smith currently is the Publisher/Cincinnati Market President of the Business Courier and has held that position since February 2011. He was previously Director of Advertising with the Business Courier since 2003. Jamie has over 25 years of media experience. After graduating from the University of Kentucky with a degree in marketing was an Account Executive for The Recorder Newspapers of Northern Kentucky. then spent 11 years in sales management with Gannett s Cincinnati Enquirer. Jamie moved to Clifton Heights after living the last 27 years in the Northern Kentucky neighborhood of Ft. Thomas. He has three children: Michael (26) doing his medical residency in Washington, D.C. Tyler (23) pursuing his graduate degree in architecture at the University of Michigan, and Mackenzie (18) a freshman at St. Louis University. Jamie has been very active with his children, coaching soccer and serving on many school committees. Jamie serves on the Board of Directors for the Cincinnati s Flying Pig Marathon serving as Treasurer. He also sits on the Board of Directors for the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and Hoxworth Blood Center/U.C. and sits on the Board of Advisors for the RediCincinnati and the Goering Center for Family and Private Business. Jamie was a 2010 graduate of the Leadership Development program sponsored by the Courier s parent company American City Business Journals and a 2013 graduate of Leadership Cincinnati Class 36 sponsored by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber.

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Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article – Brilliant Advice™

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Posts

Cern Basher featured in exclusive Cincinnati Business Courier article

EXCLUSIVE. Cincinnati money manager Cern Basher leaves firm he helped found to start new company.

Cern Basher has left the investment advisory firm he co-founded nearly 16 years ago to start a new one.

Basher left Madison Wealth Management in January, but he didn’t have much time off. Last week, he launched Brilliant Advice, a Kenwood-based investment advisory firm with a couple of twists on the typical formula.

Basher was one of six owners at Madison, which manages more than $400 million and is also located on Montgomery Road in Kenwood, when he decided to depart.

“I had some ideas and a vision of how I wanted to work with clients, and it didn’t really mesh with my partners,” Basher said. “So I made a decision to leave Madison.”

Among the things that make Basher’s firm different from most: It’s completely open about the fees it charges, it doesn’t negotiate fees and they’re significantly lower than what most firms charge.

“All wealth managers say they can negotiate fees,” Basher told me. “But the challenge as a client is it’s a bit like being on an airplane. You’re not sure how much the person sitting next to you paid, and you don’t want to be the one who paid the most. It just doesn’t seem fair to me. The fact we don’t negotiate is actually better for you as a client. You know that it’s fair and everyone is paying equal.

The homepage of Brilliant’s website has a prominent feature allowing potential clients to compare fees. It not only shows how much they’ll pay but how much they’ll save compared to a typical adviser.

Brilliant charges no more than 0.9 percent of assets. Most advisers charge 1 percent unless accounts have an enormous amount of assets. And Brilliant’s percentage rate drops as the account gets bigger. Basher also caps the fee at $50,000 a year, regardless of account size. Any account above $12.3 million is charged the same $50,000 annual fee.

Basher also will work closely with clients to develop a plan. That probably doesn’t sound different from most advisers, but he takes it to another level. He’ll actually develop a financial plan during a meeting with a client rather than gathering information and coming back later with a strategy.

“I want them to sit down with me as we do it,” Basher said. “With a typical plan, the client doesn’t know what you considered but didn’t use.”

He also uses technology to give clients constant access to their financial plan and current investment reports. There s no need for them to wait for a quarterly report.

In addition to investment management and financial planning, he’s offering what he calls lifestyle design. That’s a process that helps clients decide what’s most important to them and how they want to live after retirement. Then, Basher can tailor a financial plan to meet those lifestyle goals.

“We break it down into needs, wants and wishes,” he said. “Wishes tend to be the things people care the most about. Wouldn’t it be nice to make those wishes come true?”

About the company name: It’s not meant to tout that Basher’s advice is outstanding. He pointed out that brilliant means distinctive, excellent, and light and transparent. He’s striving for all of those.

Basher brought over two others from Madison: Holly Purcell. a portfolio manager, and Danya Karram. a financial planner.

He has a two-year non-solicitation agreement with Madison, so he can’t contact former clients to get them to move, but they can contact him and make that choice on their own.

“I’m sure former clients are interested, and we’ll also work with anyone else who’s interested,” Basher said.

Click here to read the full article about Cern Basher and Brilliant Advice in PDF format.

Below is a link to the article on the Cincinnati Business Courier website:





Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty

#cincinnati business courier

#

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

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