Getting Started In Stocks, stock investing.#Stock #investing

Getting Started In Stocks

So you’ve decided to invest in the stock market. Congratulations! In his 2005 book “The Future for Investors,” Jeremy Siegel showed that, in the long run, investing in stocks has handily outperformed investing in bonds, Treasury bills, gold or cash. In the short term, one or another asset may outperform stocks, but overall stocks have historically been the winning path.

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But there are so many ways to invest in stocks. Individual stocks, mutual funds, index funds, ETFs, domestic, foreign – how can you decide what is right for you? This article will address several issues that you, as a new (or not-so-new) investor, might want to consider so that you can rest more easily while letting your money grow.

Risk Taker, Risk Averse or in the Middle?

You may be eager to get started so that you, too, can make those fabulous returns you hear so much about, but slow down and take a moment to contemplate some simple questions. The time spent now to consider the following will save you money down the road.

What kind of person are you? Are you a risk taker, willing to throw money at a chance to make a lot of money or would you prefer a more “sure” thing? What would be your likely response to a 10% drop in a single stock in one day or a 35% drop over the course of a few weeks? Would you sell it all in a panic?

The answers to these and similar questions will lead you to consider different types of equity investments, such as mutual or index funds versus individual stocks. If you are naturally not someone to take risks, and feel uncomfortable doing so but still want to invest in stocks, the best bet for you might be mutual funds or index funds. This is because they are well diversified and contain many different stocks. This reduces risk – and doesn’t require individual stock research.

How much time and interest do you have for investing?

Should you invest in funds, stocks or both? The answer depends on how much time you wish to devote to this endeavor. Careful selection of mutual or index funds would let you invest your money, leaving the hard work of picking stocks to the fund manager. Index funds are even simpler in that they move up or down according to the type of company, industry or market they are designed to track.

Individual stock investing is the most time consuming as it requires you to make judgments about management, earnings and future prospects. As an investor, you are attempting to distinguish between a money-making stock and financial disaster. You need to know what they do, how they make their money, the risks, the future prospects and much more.

Therefore, ask yourself how much time you have to devote to this enterprise. Are you willing to spend a couple of hours a week, or more, reading about different companies, or is your life just too busy to carve out that time? Investing in individual stocks is a skill, which, like any other, takes time to develop.

It is best that you not be exposed to only one type of asset. For instance, don’t put all of your money in small biotech companies. Yes, the potential gain can be quite high, but what will happen to your investment if the Food and Drug Administration starts rejecting a higher percentage of new drugs? Your entire portfolio would be negatively impacted.

It is better to be diversified across several different sectors such as real estate (a real estate investment trust is one possibility), consumer goods, commodities, insurance, etc., rather than focusing on one or two or three, as above. Consider diversifying across asset classes, as well, by keeping some money in bonds and cash, rather than being 100% invested in stocks. How much to have in these different sectors and classes is up to you, but being invested more broadly lessens the risk of losing it all at any one time.

A Portfolio for Beginners

If you are just starting out, think seriously about investing most of your money in a couple of index funds, such as one tracking the broad market (e.g. the S ?>

Investing in Stocks for Beginners, stock investing.#Stock #investing

The Complete Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Stock

Stock investing

History has shown that investing in stocks is one of the easiest and most profitable ways to build wealth over the long-term. With a handful of notable exceptions, almost every member of the Forbes 400 list got there because they own a large block of shares in a public or private corporation. Although your beginning may be humble, this guide to investing in stocks will explain what stocks are, how you can make money from them, and much more.

What Is Stock?

Stock investing

Have you ever asked yourself, What is stock? or wondered why shares of stock exist? This introduction to the world of investing in stocks will provide answers to those questions and show you just how simple Wall Street really is. It may turn out to be one of the most important articles you ve ever read if you don t understand what stocks represent. Find out the answer to What is Stock? and how it comes to exist . More

How Do I Actually Make Money from Investing in Stocks?

Stock investing

You probably know that investing in stocks is a way to get rich but very few new investors actually realize how you make money from your shares of stock. Now, you don t have to wonder any longer. Let us show you the two ways you can profit from owning and investing in stocks, and some of the factors that determine how fast a company grows. Find out how to make money from owning stocks . More

How to Invest in Stocks

Stock investing

Once you ve come up with a list of potential stock investments, you need to actually jump in and start buying shares. How do you do it? It s not hard at all. Let us show you how to invest in stocks . More

How Can I Find Stocks for My Portfolio?

Stock investing

Now that you understand the basics of investing in stocks, the next step is to find investment ideas. You need the names of actual companies in which you want to purchase stock. How can you find good investment ideas? Here are some suggestions . More

Why Do Stock Prices Fluctuate?

Stock investing

When you own shares of stock, you better get used to your portfolio going up 50% or falling 50% over short periods of time. What, exactly, makes shares of stock fluctuate so much? The answer is really simple . More

What Is a Stock Split?

Stock investing

If you invest in stock, you are going to experience a stock split at one time or another. What is a stock split? Are stock splits good or bad for you? Find out what stock splits do to your investments . More

What Is a Stock’s Market Capitalization (and Why Should I Care)?

Stock investing

Once you begin investing in stock, you need to pay close attention to the market capitalization of each stock you own. Terms such as mega cap, big cap, small cap, and micro cap may not make sense to you now, but in a few moments, it will be old hat. Find out more about how market capitalization influences your investment returns . More

What You Should Know About Stock Prices

Stock investing

Did you know a $50 stock can be more expensive than an $800 stock? It has to do with the way corporations are structured and as a new investor, this is one of the most important things you need to learn before you invest a single dollar into the stock market. Find out how you should think about share price . More

Dividends 101

Stock investing

Studies have shown that 99% of the real, after-inflation return you earn on your stock investments will come from the dividends you receive each year. This guide covers everything a new stock investor needs to know about dividends including how they are paid, and much more. More

Should I Invest In Blue Chip Stocks?

Stock investing

Now that you are an investor, you are going to hear a lot about blue chip stocks, or bellwethers as they were called in the old days. How is investing in blue chip stocks different, and why would you consider adding them to your portfolio? Discover the benefits of blue chip stocks . More

How Is Investing in Preferred Stock Different from Investing in Stock?

Stock investing

Preferred stock is very different from regular shares of common stock that virtually all investors have owned at one time or another. In fact, preferred stocks have their own list of risks and drawbacks. Find out how investing in preferred stocks is different . More

How To Choose a Stock Broker for Your Stocks

Stock investing

It s difficult to begin investing in stocks without a stock broker. This complete guide to choosing a stock broker and brokerage firm should make the process easy and enjoyable. More





Investing in stocks – May, investing in stocks.#Investing #in #stocks

Investing in stocks

When you own a share of stock, you are a part owner in the company with a claim — however small it may be — on every asset and every penny in earnings. As a company’s earnings improve, investors are willing to pay more for the stock.

You can easily open a low-cost brokerage account online, at sites like Fidelity, Charles Schwab, TDAmeritrade or Scotrade. You can move money electronically into your account and start trading. Most discount broker sites charge a set fee of around $10 per trade.

What different types of stocks are there?

There are thousands of stocks to choose from, so investors usually put stocks into different categories: size, style and sector.

A company’s size refers to its market capitalization, which is the current share price times the total number of shares outstanding. It’s how much investors think the whole company is worth.

Companies with large market capitalizations, or “large-cap” companies tend to be established and stable, but because of their size, they have lower growth potential than small caps.

Over the long run, small-cap stocks have tended to rise at a faster pace. With less developed management structures, small caps are more likely to run into trouble as they grow.

Mid-caps, or medium-sized companies, fall somewhere in the middle.

A “growth” company is one that is expanding at an above-average rate, much as tech companies did in the 1990s. Catch a successful growth stock early on, and the ride can be spectacular. But again, the greater the potential, the bigger the risk. Growth stocks race higher when times are good, but as soon as growth slows, those stocks tank.

The opposite of growth is “value.” There is no one definition of a value stock, but in general, it trades at a lower-than-average earnings multiple than the overall market. Maybe the company has messed up, causing the stock to plummet — a value investor might think the underlying business is still sound and its true worth not reflected in the depressed stock price.

A “cyclical” company makes something that isn’t in constant demand throughout the business cycle. For example, steel makers see sales rise when the economy heats up, spurring builders to put up new skyscrapers and consumers to buy new cars.

But when the economy slows, their sales lag too. Cyclical stocks bounce around a lot as investors try to guess when the next upturn and downturn will come.

Standard Poor’s breaks stocks into 10 sectors and dozens of industries. Generally speaking, different sectors are affected by different things. So at any given time, some are doing well while others are not.

In most cases, finance, health care and technology tend to be the fastest growing sectors, while consumer staples and utilities offer stability with moderate growth. The other sectors tend to be cyclical, expanding quickly in good times and contracting during recessions.

Although there are more than 6,000 publicly traded companies, the core of your stock portfolio should consist of financially strong companies with above-average earnings growth.

There are only about 200 stocks that fit that description. A well-balanced stock portfolio should consist of 15 to 20 stocks, across seven or more different industries.

As a general rule, stocks with moderately above-average growth rates and reasonable valuations are the best buys. Statistically, high-growth stocks are usually overpriced and have a harder time meeting inflated investor expectations.

The first thing to look at is the stock’s price/earnings ratio compared with its projected total return. Ideally, the P/E should be less than double the projected return (a P/E of no more than 30 for a stock with 15% total return potential).





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Key events are scheduled for the companies listed below next week. Notable earnings reports: Tyson Foods (NYSE:TSN), Progressive (NYSE:PGR), and Kamada (NASDAQ:KMDA) on .

Investing in stocks

By Tim Hepher and Alexander Cornwell DUBAI (Reuters) – Dubai s Emirates [EMIRA.UL] may place an order at the Dubai Airshow for 36-38 Airbus A380 superjumbo jets, worth some .

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(Reuters) – Three UCLA men s basketball players detained in China over allegations of shoplifting this week will not be on the team s return flight to the United States .

Stock Markets Analysis & Opinion

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Leading cruise-line operator, Norwegian Cruise Line (NASDAQ:NCLH) took a hit Friday after reporting earnings. At one point, the stock was down by nearly 3% on the back of weaker guidance. Other .

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For Immediate ReleaseChicago, IL November 10, 2017 Zacks.com announces the list of stocks featured in the Analyst Blog. Every day the Zacks Equity Research analysts discuss the latest .

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A reassuring trading update confirms that SuperGroup (OTC:SEPGY) continues to deliver attractive top-line growth. Admittedly, the superior wholesale performance means (as previously flagged by the .

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How to Invest in Stocks: A Starting Guide, investing in stocks.#Investing #in

How to Invest in Stocks

Investing in stocks

Like many new investors, you ve decided to invest in a company and pick up your first shares of stock, but your limited knowledge leaves you wondering how to actually do it. Don t worry! This overview was designed to help you learn precisely that – how to invest in stocks. To be more specific, for you new investors out there, this page was put together to serve as an introductory depository of investment articles designed to get many of the basics out of the way before moving on to some of the more advanced topics which I ve written over the past years.

I created it as part of The Complete Beginner s Guide to Investing in Stock and it provides a short checklist of topics, complete with links to much more in-depth articles, where you can study whatever it is you want to research about investing in stock.

Once you are ready to move on from these resources, you can check out the nearly 1,000 articles I ve written on this site as well as the thousands of articles I ve posted on my personal blog, which covers more advanced business, finance, and investing topics.

The Four Major Ways to Invest Your Money in Stocks

There are typically four major ways to invest your money in stocks:

The Five Types of Assets You Might Own When You Invest

Generally, there are five types of assets the average investor is likely to own in his or her lifetime, whether or not he or she invests in these assets directly or through a pooled structure such as a mutual fund, index fund, exchange traded fund, or hedge fund:

  1. Common Stocks – When you invest in stock, you acquire an ownership stake in an actual operating business, along with your share of the net earnings and resulting dividends produced by the firm. Although you don t have to invest in stock to get rich, over the past could of centuries, equities (stocks) have been the highest returning asset class and have produced the most wealth. To learn more, read What Is Stock?, which will break down the fundamentals.
  2. Preferred Stocks – Preferred stock is a special type of stock that often pays higher dividends but has limited upside.
  3. Bonds – When you lend money to a country, municipality, business, or other institution, you buy bonds such as corporate bonds, municipal bonds, savings bonds, U.S. government Treasury bonds, etc.
  4. Money Markets – Money markets are highly liquid investments that are designed to protect your purchasing power. They are considered a cash equivalent. There are two varieties, money market accounts and money market funds. There are also at least five other alternatives to money markets.
  5. Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) – REITs are a special type of company designation that allows no taxation at the company level provided more than 90% of earnings are paid out to the shareholders. The assets are often invested in a variety of real estate projects and properties.

The Importance of Research When Investing in Stocks

When researching an investment, there are typically five documents you ll want to get your hands on so you can analyze the relative merit of a potential stock. These documents, which you should have no trouble finding, are:

  1. The Form 10-K – This is the annual filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and is probably the single most important research document available to investors about a company.
  2. The most recent Form 10-Q – This is the quarterly version of the Form 10-K.
  3. Proxy Statement – The Proxy Statement includes information on the Board of Directors as well as management compensation and shareholder proposals.
  4. The most recent annual report – While reading the annual report, you ll want to pay special attention to the letter from the Chairman, CEO, and sometimes CFO or other high-ranking officers to see how they view the business. Not all annual reports are created equally. Generally, the best in the business is considered to be the one written by Warren Buffett at Berkshire Hathaway, which you can download from free on the holding company s corporate site.

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  1. A statistical showing going back five or ten years. Several firms prepare this type of information in easy-to-digest formats, mostly for a subscription fee. Some of the major research houses and products include Morningstar, The ValueLine Investment Survey, Standard and Poor s, and Moody’s.

The Three Financial Statements Necessary for Stock Investing

Before buying an ownership stake in a company by investing in its stock, it is vital that you examine the following three financial statements closely:

All three financial statements work together and reinforce one another – you cannot study them in isolation or you ll find yourself making decisions based on partial data; a mistake that can be costly, especially when you decide to invest in stock rather than a more senior security higher up in the capital structure, such as a bond.

Other Tips and Helpful Resources for New Investors Investing in Stocks

Finally, there are some things you’ll want to look for in a company and its management before you buy shares of stock. I expand upon these tips in the articles listed below.

In addition, here are a few more articles you ll find helpful in your investing journey.

If you want to learn more about how to invest in a stock, check out the directory of Investing for Beginners articles I ve written, sorted by topic or head over to my personal blog for more esoteric and advanced topics that aren t particularly appropriate for beginners. Whatever happens, remember that stocks are just one of many types of assets that you can use to build wealth and become financially independent.





Investing in stocks – May, investing in stocks.#Investing #in #stocks

Investing in stocks

When you own a share of stock, you are a part owner in the company with a claim — however small it may be — on every asset and every penny in earnings. As a company’s earnings improve, investors are willing to pay more for the stock.

You can easily open a low-cost brokerage account online, at sites like Fidelity, Charles Schwab, TDAmeritrade or Scotrade. You can move money electronically into your account and start trading. Most discount broker sites charge a set fee of around $10 per trade.

What different types of stocks are there?

There are thousands of stocks to choose from, so investors usually put stocks into different categories: size, style and sector.

A company’s size refers to its market capitalization, which is the current share price times the total number of shares outstanding. It’s how much investors think the whole company is worth.

Companies with large market capitalizations, or “large-cap” companies tend to be established and stable, but because of their size, they have lower growth potential than small caps.

Over the long run, small-cap stocks have tended to rise at a faster pace. With less developed management structures, small caps are more likely to run into trouble as they grow.

Mid-caps, or medium-sized companies, fall somewhere in the middle.

A “growth” company is one that is expanding at an above-average rate, much as tech companies did in the 1990s. Catch a successful growth stock early on, and the ride can be spectacular. But again, the greater the potential, the bigger the risk. Growth stocks race higher when times are good, but as soon as growth slows, those stocks tank.

The opposite of growth is “value.” There is no one definition of a value stock, but in general, it trades at a lower-than-average earnings multiple than the overall market. Maybe the company has messed up, causing the stock to plummet — a value investor might think the underlying business is still sound and its true worth not reflected in the depressed stock price.

A “cyclical” company makes something that isn’t in constant demand throughout the business cycle. For example, steel makers see sales rise when the economy heats up, spurring builders to put up new skyscrapers and consumers to buy new cars.

But when the economy slows, their sales lag too. Cyclical stocks bounce around a lot as investors try to guess when the next upturn and downturn will come.

Standard Poor’s breaks stocks into 10 sectors and dozens of industries. Generally speaking, different sectors are affected by different things. So at any given time, some are doing well while others are not.

In most cases, finance, health care and technology tend to be the fastest growing sectors, while consumer staples and utilities offer stability with moderate growth. The other sectors tend to be cyclical, expanding quickly in good times and contracting during recessions.

Although there are more than 6,000 publicly traded companies, the core of your stock portfolio should consist of financially strong companies with above-average earnings growth.

There are only about 200 stocks that fit that description. A well-balanced stock portfolio should consist of 15 to 20 stocks, across seven or more different industries.

As a general rule, stocks with moderately above-average growth rates and reasonable valuations are the best buys. Statistically, high-growth stocks are usually overpriced and have a harder time meeting inflated investor expectations.

The first thing to look at is the stock’s price/earnings ratio compared with its projected total return. Ideally, the P/E should be less than double the projected return (a P/E of no more than 30 for a stock with 15% total return potential).





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Online Trading, Retirement, Investments, Scottrade, Inc, investing in stocks.#Investing #in #stocks

investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

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Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Scottrade, Inc. and Scottrade Bank are separate but affiliated companies and are wholly owned subsidiaries of Scottrade Financial Services, Inc. Brokerage Products and Services offered by Scottrade, Inc. – Member FINRA and SIPC. Deposit products and services offered by Scottrade Bank, Member FDIC.

Investing in stocks

Brokerage products and services offered by Scottrade, Inc. – Member FINRA and SIPC.

Brokerage products are not insured by the FDIC — are not deposits or other obligations of the Bank and are not guaranteed by the Bank — are subject to investment risks, including possible loss of the principal invested.

Investors should consider the investment objectives, charges, expense, and unique risk profile of an exchange-traded fund (ETF) before investing. A prospectus contains this and other information about the fund and may be obtained online or by contacting Scottrade. The prospectus should be read carefully before investing.

Options involve risk and are not suitable for all investors. Detailed information on our policies and the risks associated with options can be found in the Scottrade ® Options Application and Agreement, Brokerage Account Agreement, by downloading the Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options and Supplements (PDF) from The Options Clearing Corporation, or by requesting a copy by contacting Scottrade. Supporting documentation for any claims will be supplied upon request. Consult with your tax advisor for information on how taxes may affect the outcome of these strategies. Keep in mind, profit will be reduced or loss worsened, as applicable, by the deduction of commissions and fees.

All investing involves risk. The value of your investment may fluctuate over time, and you may gain or lose money.

Scottrade ® , the Scottrade ® logo and all other trademarks, whether registered or unregistered, are the property of TD Ameritrade IP Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission.





How to Invest in Stocks (with Pictures), stock investing.#Stock #investing

How to Invest in Stocks

It is no coincidence that most wealthy people invest in the stock market. While fortunes can be both made and lost, investing in stocks is one of the best ways to create financial security, independence, and generational wealth. Whether you are just beginning to save or already have a nest egg for retirement, your money should be working as efficiently and diligently for you as you did to earn it. To succeed in this, however, it is important to start with a solid understanding of how stock market investment works. This article will guide you through the process of making investment decisions and put you on the right path to becoming a successful investor. This article discusses investing in stocks specifically. For stock trading, see How to Trade Stocks. For mutual funds, see How to Decide Whether to Buy Stocks or Mutual Funds.

Steps Edit

Part One of Three:

Establishing Your Goals and Expectations Edit

Stock investing

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Stock investing

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Stock investing

Part Two of Three:

Making Your Investments Edit

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Part Three of Three:

Monitoring and Maintaining Your Portfolio Edit

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing





Online Trading, Retirement, Investments, Scottrade, Inc, investing in stocks.#Investing #in #stocks

investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Investing in stocks

Scottrade, Inc. and Scottrade Bank are separate but affiliated companies and are wholly owned subsidiaries of Scottrade Financial Services, Inc. Brokerage Products and Services offered by Scottrade, Inc. – Member FINRA and SIPC. Deposit products and services offered by Scottrade Bank, Member FDIC.

Investing in stocks

Brokerage products and services offered by Scottrade, Inc. – Member FINRA and SIPC.

Brokerage products are not insured by the FDIC — are not deposits or other obligations of the Bank and are not guaranteed by the Bank — are subject to investment risks, including possible loss of the principal invested.

Investors should consider the investment objectives, charges, expense, and unique risk profile of an exchange-traded fund (ETF) before investing. A prospectus contains this and other information about the fund and may be obtained online or by contacting Scottrade. The prospectus should be read carefully before investing.

Options involve risk and are not suitable for all investors. Detailed information on our policies and the risks associated with options can be found in the Scottrade ® Options Application and Agreement, Brokerage Account Agreement, by downloading the Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options and Supplements (PDF) from The Options Clearing Corporation, or by requesting a copy by contacting Scottrade. Supporting documentation for any claims will be supplied upon request. Consult with your tax advisor for information on how taxes may affect the outcome of these strategies. Keep in mind, profit will be reduced or loss worsened, as applicable, by the deduction of commissions and fees.

All investing involves risk. The value of your investment may fluctuate over time, and you may gain or lose money.

Scottrade ® , the Scottrade ® logo and all other trademarks, whether registered or unregistered, are the property of TD Ameritrade IP Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission.





How to Invest in Stocks (with Pictures), stock investing.#Stock #investing

How to Invest in Stocks

It is no coincidence that most wealthy people invest in the stock market. While fortunes can be both made and lost, investing in stocks is one of the best ways to create financial security, independence, and generational wealth. Whether you are just beginning to save or already have a nest egg for retirement, your money should be working as efficiently and diligently for you as you did to earn it. To succeed in this, however, it is important to start with a solid understanding of how stock market investment works. This article will guide you through the process of making investment decisions and put you on the right path to becoming a successful investor. This article discusses investing in stocks specifically. For stock trading, see How to Trade Stocks. For mutual funds, see How to Decide Whether to Buy Stocks or Mutual Funds.

Steps Edit

Part One of Three:

Establishing Your Goals and Expectations Edit

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Part Two of Three:

Making Your Investments Edit

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Part Three of Three:

Monitoring and Maintaining Your Portfolio Edit

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing

Stock investing





First Citizens Bank – Banking, Credit Cards, Mortgages, Investing #entrepreneurial #ideas

#business online

#

JavaScript is required for this site to function properly. Find instructions for how to enable JavaScript here .

Products designed to help small businesses grow and succeed

Accounts designed to meet business needs

Whether you need just the basics or an account with extra features, First Citizens business banking options make it easy to find the right fit for your specific needs.

Financial options for your business investments

First Citizens gives you a variety of financing options for equipment. Offering customizable terms, we can also help you easily meet your tax, accounting and business cycle cash flow needs.

Solutions to streamline your transactions

With services that make it easier to accept credit and debit card payments and enable you to deposit checks from your office, First Citizens can help improve your transaction efficiency, reduce your costs and boost your bottom line.

Grow your business, and your community, with an SBA loan

As a preferred lender of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), First Citizens offers loans designed to help businesses grow. SBA loans can offer advantages over traditional loans, including lower down payments, longer repayment terms, and greater flexibility to use for a variety of businesses and purposes.

Approved to offer SBA loan products under SBA s Preferred Lender programs.

A simple, cost-effective payroll solution

First Citizens Online Payroll can help simplify and streamline your payroll processes, with features that automatically calculate withholdings, taxes and net pay while also initiating direct deposits to your employees.

Customized options to protect what you ve built

As an independent insurance agency with more than 80 years of experience helping businesses, First Citizens Insurance Services can customize a risk management program to fit your business, and compare insurance options from a variety of carriers on your behalf.

Financial solutions to support your growing business

Commercial Analysis Accounts

Consolidates your business deposit accounts into a single relationship in order to manage cash flow more effectively.

From payroll to wire transfers, payables solutions are designed to help you gain greater control of all of your payment transactions for maximum efficiency.

With solutions that include ACH, eReceivables and Remote Image Deposit, First Citizens can help you streamline the collections process and manage incoming cash.

Quickly and automatically reconcile all checks paid against your First Citizens checking account to help save you time and money in keeping your records current.

Industry Specific Expertise

Our experienced business professionals can provide insight and guidance unique to these specific business sectors.

Business Insights

Strategies for improving cash flow

Learn how to better predict your income and expenses

Financing your business

Financial options to support your business success

Learn how our personal banking products and services can help you minimize costs and maximize your time.

Learn more

Project your business cash flow

Quick Links

Insurance products are not insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency and are not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by, any bank or bank affiliate.

* Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.

2016 First Citizens Bank

Raleigh – North Hills

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1. Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.





Wells Fargo Small Business – Online and Business Banking, Lending and Investing

#small business banking

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Wells Fargo Personal

  1. Next-day funding available for most transactions when funding to a Wells Fargo checking or savings account.

Important notice regarding use of cookies: By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies as described in our Digital Privacy and Cookies Policy.

Brokerage products and services are offered through Wells Fargo Advisors. Wells Fargo Advisors is the trade name used by two separate registered broker-dealers: Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC and Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network, LLC, Members SIPC. non-bank affiliates of Wells Fargo Company and is intended only for United States residents. WellsTrade ® is offered through Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC.

Wells Fargo Insurance, Inc. (Minneapolis, MN) is a licensed agency that represents — and is compensated by — the insurer based on the amount of insurance sold.

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank
  • May Lose Value

Deposit products offered by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Member FDIC.

Equal Housing Lender

© 1999 – 2016 Wells Fargo. All rights reserved. NMLSR ID 399801





Canadian Business – Your Source For Business News – Your source for

#business magazines

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How new rules could change Canada’s social media marketing landscape

How to fire your spouse

Nearly every category of consumer electronics shows declining sales

How to hire your spouse

Canada Goose CEO Dani Reiss on how to build an international brand

How to express frustration productively

Canada is cracking down on paid social media endorsements

Sign up for our daily morning strategy briefing

How to be happier at work

Making connections is what turns good entrepreneurs into great ones

The inside story of what really went wrong at Target Canada

Scientists prove that sucking up to your boss actually works

Inside the surreal, competitive race to clean up Fort McMurray

These three investing legends are warning of another market crash

Smoke’s Poutinerie intends to become a global fast-food giant

Why aren’t women enrolling in Canada’s MBA schools?

Canada’s Best Jobs 2016: The Top 25 Jobs In Canada

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    Turnkey Cash-Flow Investment Properties #turnkey #rental #properties, #real #estate #investment, #investment #property,


    #

    Investment Properties

    • Your company and website provide an awesome resource for the aspiring ‘turn-key’ investor.

    S. Thompson

  • Simple process and very reliable guidance — buying through Norada is a breeze!
    Daniel Brown
  • Your commitment to always give value to your prospects (web site tools, blog, personal time, etc.) is a terrific distinguishing attribute and sets Norada apart from other real estate firms.
    E. Hauber
  • Marco was professional, helpful and informative throughout my initial investment opportunity. His knowledge, guidance and support made my experience exceptional!
    Derek Pines
  • Everything went as planned. Everyone Norada lined up was easy to work with. Couldn’t ask for an easier transaction. I am very satisfied with my investment.
    Tyler Caruso
  • Marco and his team were very responsive, thorough and honest. I have already recommended them to other investors.
    Patrick and Ryan M.
  • I’m an investor from the Netherlands (Europe) and trust is the most important factor for me. Marco earned my trust over and over by his knowledge and his excellent service.
    Sebastian Van de Poppe
  • The process was incredibly easy and the investment exceeded our objectives. Thank you for providing us the opportunity to hit a home run and strengthen our financial portfolio!
    Bryan Dunker
  • I appreciate the great level of service that you guys gave, and will definitely keep you in mind for future deals.
    Mark Rosenberg, Esq.
  • My wife and I connected with Marco and he was very knowledgeable and helpful in assisting us purchasing a duplex in Indianapolis. His network covers all aspects of the purchase with very few surprises. We are looking forward to working more with him and his team in the near future.
    Tom Kostek
  • The entire investment property ordeal was very foreign to me, despite the research that I was able to do prior. I want to commend Marco for being so transparent, informative, and diligent with me; you are a great businessman!
    Jonathan L.
  • Marco made it very easy for me as an out of state investor. His expertise in the markets makes me feel very reassured.
    Emily D.
  • In the 4-1/2 years I’ve been looking at Real Estate companies online, I’ve yet to see a turn-key property company that I think is better than Norada.
    Ralph Franks
  • Norada provided me with great service and they were flexible with some of my issues during the transaction process.
    Robert I.
  • I would definitely consider Norada since Marco is very active in BP. In addition, he is very responsive and knowledgeable!
    Chris K.
  • I can’t say enough about Norada’s top notch, all-around professionalism. As someone who conducts business-to-business transactions, I can vouch that they are an absolute pleasure to work with.
    Liz Nowlin
  • Marco is one of the smartest real estate guys I spoke to in the last four years!
    A.U. New York
  • Transaction was pretty smooth. All my questions were handled in timely fashion and to my satisfaction. Overall, great experience.
    Tushar Puri
  • I appreciate your first-rate presentations and professionalism. You are head of the class.
    Ian Y.
  • I am very impressed with your website and more importantly your investor approach. I like transparency and your success is proving that investors like transparency as well.
    Paul Janerico
  • Marco stepped up to the plate and became an exceptionally well versed, educated and valuable provider of quality properties and resources for anyone buying.
    Cherie Anderson
  • Friendly staff and great communication. I always felt like I was involved throughout the process. Property closed quickly.
    Cameron C.
  • Insights like yours are why people like yourself are so valuable on my team.
    Tom Kostek
  • I’m a big fan of all the info you guys publish and appreciate it.
    Brandon Laughridge
  • I appreciate the continued excellent customer service and advice that was provided along the way.
    William S.
  • You are awesome! Thanks for the advice and guiding me through each step.
    Emily
  • I am looking forward to expanding my real estate portfolio and would not hesitate to use Marco and Norada again.
    Tom K.
  • One thing I like about your company is the ability to be in several different markets to help diversify my real estate portfolio.
    K. Bassett
  • I love your setup. It makes my job a heck of a lot easier.
    S. Kornbluth
  • Norada Real Estate is an excellent resource for anyone looking to invest in real estate. I enjoyed working with Marco Santarelli, and he was a great help through the entire process.
    J. Chen
  • I have to say that I’m really happy with the purchase.
    Sebastian van de Poppe (Holland)
  • Marco is extremely professional and helpful. He is your go-to person for investment real estate.
    Whitney W.
  • Marco is very knowledgable and helpful to a starter investor like myself. He navigated us through the whole process and promptly assisted us when necessary to close on our first purchase.
    Ranjith M.
  • Marco is an awesome guy. In our industry, it’s critical that you find people to work with that are smart, credible, honest, and just fun to be around. If you’re looking for those things, Marco is your man.
    Mike Hambright
  • Thanks Marco – it’s been great. I looking forward to many more!
    Rami M.
  • Marco was a great help in helping to simplify the process of looking for an investment property. Thanks Marco!
    Anthony Dickson
  • You read my mind. That would be great and VERY much appreciated. That kind of assistance is what makes Norada a cut above the rest.
    LeRand D.
  • It was a great decision to work with Norada. I couldn’t be happier with the property I’ve acquired with positive net cash flow each. Look forward to building my portfolio even larger.
    D. Cerecedes
  • Marco is not only full of knowledge and experience, he goes out of his way to share that information by making himself extremely accessible. His patient guidance on everything from property purchasing to asset protection has made my foray into the highly stressful world of real estate investing a genuine pleasure. I look forward to working with Marco many more times in the future.

    Follow and Connect





  • Google Finance – Get company stock quotes streaming live #finance, #reference, #research,


    #

    Google Finance

    What it’s good for

    • Information on personal finance from Google
    • Google Finance offers a broad range of information about stocks, mutual funds, public and private companies, interactive charts, news and fundamental data
    • Excellent site for financial information
    • Google s tool for searching financial information
    • Real Time quotes and market overview
    • Google Finance offers financial data and news for most publicly-traded companies
    • Excellent interactive charts for any stock, mutual fund or currency for right now or any date in the past (historical data) with annotations for dates of big news events
    • Get live streaming statistics from wall street
    • Search stocks and get real time stock quotes
    • Perform stock research to evaluate a stock or mutual fund before investing and get quick price charts for analysis
    • Business information, news, and interactive charts. Get market summary, market news, stock quotes, and videos related to the economy and market news. Find real-time, last sale prices from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) for free, along with those from NASDAQ. Wondering what Ford (F) is trading at today? Search for it on Google or Google Finance and keep the page up to have the quotes stream live. Access to real-time financial information has traditionally been limited to investors with brokerage accounts and other users via subscription fees. This free access was made available on Google Finance beginning in June 2008. Other features available on Google Finance includes the ability to create a personal, customized portfolio overview of stock values that you want to monitor

    Google Finance

    Popularity

    2017 iTools


    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #business

    #investor business daily

    #

    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

    Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

    Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

    Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

    Buying Low-Priced Stocks
    What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

    Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

    A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

    Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

    Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

    The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

    Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
    “Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

    While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

    Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

    Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

    More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

    At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

    Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
    Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

    Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

    A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

    Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

    The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

    If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

    Averaging Down
    Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

    For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

    In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

    When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

    Buying Stocks In A Down Market
    Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

    The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

    Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

    When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

    CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
    If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

    For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .





    Canadian Business – Your Source For Business News – Your source for

    #business magazines

    #

    How new rules could change Canada’s social media marketing landscape

    How to fire your spouse

    Nearly every category of consumer electronics shows declining sales

    How to hire your spouse

    Canada Goose CEO Dani Reiss on how to build an international brand

    How to express frustration productively

    Canada is cracking down on paid social media endorsements

    Sign up for our daily morning strategy briefing

    How to be happier at work

    Making connections is what turns good entrepreneurs into great ones

    The inside story of what really went wrong at Target Canada

    Scientists prove that sucking up to your boss actually works

    Inside the surreal, competitive race to clean up Fort McMurray

    These three investing legends are warning of another market crash

    Smoke’s Poutinerie intends to become a global fast-food giant

    Why aren’t women enrolling in Canada’s MBA schools?

    Canada’s Best Jobs 2016: The Top 25 Jobs In Canada

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    How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 #get #a #business

    #investing in stocks

    #

    How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 – TheStreet

    Stocks are an equity investment that represents part ownership in a corporation and entitles you to part of that corporation’s earnings and assets.

    Common stock gives shareholders voting rights but no guarantee of dividend payments. Preferred stocks provides no voting rights but usually guarantees a dividend payment.

    In the past, shareholders received a paper stock certificate — called a security — verifying the number of shares they owned. Today, share ownership is usually recorded electronically, and the shares are held in street name by your brokerage firm.

    Investing in stocks can be tricky business. In fact, it’s best to treat all of your investment pursuits as a business. Heck, that’s what Benjamin Graham (Warren Buffett’s stock market mentor) recommended.

    Before you buy your first stock, you should master the basics of stock investing. This won’t make you a great investor overnight, but only when you understand the fundamentals of investing can you learn how to invest in stocks with confidence.

    If you found this content useful, please share it. This will help us create more educational guides for investors.

    RESOURCES FOR INVESTORS:

    Jim Cramer and 30+ Wall Street professionals provide actionable guidance ranging from technical analysis to momentum trading and fundamental stock picking. Every trading day, Real Money offers a wealth of insight, analysis and strategies for all styles of investing.

    • Access to Jim Cramer’s daily blog
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    Online Investing #start #business #ideas

    #investing in stocks

    #

    Online Investing

    About the Online Investing Page:

    Many investors find it more efficient to trade and manage their portfolios online. This requires a fair amount of education and research. Through our Online Investing section, we offer investors everything from the basics to the latest financial tools.

    Investor Resource of the Week

    Analyst Info – This page shows graphical representations of a company’s Consensus Recommendation, Detailed Analyst Recommendation, 12 Month Price Target Range, Earnings Surprise, Momentum (4 Weeks), Detailed Estimates Submitted, Earnings Growth, Price/Earnings, Consensus Earnings Forecasts and PEG Ratio.

    Online Investing Articles

    • Diversification, Planners, and Brokers
      Of course you want your investments to grow. Here are some tips on diversification, choosing a broker and choosing a financial planner.
      Before you can invest for the future, you need to have money put aside for the present. Don’t be forced to liquidate some investments when an emergency arises. Build an emergency fund of three to six months’ living expenses, and you’ll be giving your online investments the best possible chance to grow. Read More
    • Investing in Stock
      Equities have been the road to wealth for many investors, but selecting the right ones for your portfolio is a difficult process. Chasing after the latest hot tip is no better than taping a newspaper stock page to a dartboard and throwing a dart. Take time to do some homework. This article is a good place to start in your search for unbiased advice for investing online. Read More
    • Money Market Comparison Chart
      This chart provides a quick comparison of rates on the three major types of money market accounts — taxable mutual funds, nontaxable mutual funds, and money market deposit accounts. Read More
      Check out our list of high yielding money market accounts and money market mutual funds:
      • Taxable Money Market Mutual Funds
      • Non-Taxable Money Market Mutual Funds
      • Money Market Accounts
    • Margin Trading
      It’s no secret that the advent of credit did wonders to beef up our modern economy, and the stock market has been no exception. While most new online investors buy stock through traditional cash accounts, there is another way. Read More
    • Two Sides to Every Trade
      One of the hardest concepts for a new investor to grasp is the idea that every single trade represents a difference in perception between you and whoever’s on the other side of the transaction. What do you know that the other guy doesn’t? Read More
    • Analyze Mutual Fund and ETF Fees and Expenses
      Fees and expenses can vary widely from fund to fund. Here�s a tool to help you compare how sales loads, fees, commissions, and other fund expenses can affect returns. Even small differences in expenses can make a big difference in your return over time. Read More
    • How to Trade Options
      Stock options are an incredibly versatile online investment flavor. Despite their reputation as an instrument for high-rollers, there are several conservative options strategies almost anyone can employ. Sophisticated investors find options can be highly profitable. Read More
    • Test Your Financial Knowledge
      Today, more than 84 million Americans and countless others around the world invest in the U.S. equities markets, some directly, others through pension plans, mutual funds, and other vehicles. The NASD recently surveyed investors to get an idea of what people know – and what people may not know – about investing. See how you stack up against other investors. Read More

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    First Citizens Bank – Banking, Credit Cards, Mortgages, Investing #business #advisor

    #business online

    #

    JavaScript is required for this site to function properly. Find instructions for how to enable JavaScript here .

    Products designed to help small businesses grow and succeed

    Accounts designed to meet business needs

    Whether you need just the basics or an account with extra features, First Citizens business banking options make it easy to find the right fit for your specific needs.

    Financial options for your business investments

    First Citizens gives you a variety of financing options for equipment. Offering customizable terms, we can also help you easily meet your tax, accounting and business cycle cash flow needs.

    Solutions to streamline your transactions

    With services that make it easier to accept credit and debit card payments and enable you to deposit checks from your office, First Citizens can help improve your transaction efficiency, reduce your costs and boost your bottom line.

    Grow your business, and your community, with an SBA loan

    As a preferred lender of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), First Citizens offers loans designed to help businesses grow. SBA loans can offer advantages over traditional loans, including lower down payments, longer repayment terms, and greater flexibility to use for a variety of businesses and purposes.

    Approved to offer SBA loan products under SBA s Preferred Lender programs.

    A simple, cost-effective payroll solution

    First Citizens Online Payroll can help simplify and streamline your payroll processes, with features that automatically calculate withholdings, taxes and net pay while also initiating direct deposits to your employees.

    Customized options to protect what you ve built

    As an independent insurance agency with more than 80 years of experience helping businesses, First Citizens Insurance Services can customize a risk management program to fit your business, and compare insurance options from a variety of carriers on your behalf.

    Financial solutions to support your growing business

    Commercial Analysis Accounts

    Consolidates your business deposit accounts into a single relationship in order to manage cash flow more effectively.

    From payroll to wire transfers, payables solutions are designed to help you gain greater control of all of your payment transactions for maximum efficiency.

    With solutions that include ACH, eReceivables and Remote Image Deposit, First Citizens can help you streamline the collections process and manage incoming cash.

    Quickly and automatically reconcile all checks paid against your First Citizens checking account to help save you time and money in keeping your records current.

    Industry Specific Expertise

    Our experienced business professionals can provide insight and guidance unique to these specific business sectors.

    Business Insights

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    Learn how to better predict your income and expenses

    Financing your business

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    Learn how our personal banking products and services can help you minimize costs and maximize your time.

    Learn more

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    Insurance products are not insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency and are not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by, any bank or bank affiliate.

    * Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.

    2016 First Citizens Bank

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    1. Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.





    Tweedy, Browne Company LLC #tweedy, #tweedy #browne #company #llc, #value #investing, #equity


    #

    Welcome to Tweedy, Browne

    We invite you to browse through our website and learn more about Tweedy, Browne, our value investment philosophy, our long history and the people who are Tweedy, Browne. For over ninety years we have been active in the value investing business. It is our only business and it is how we invest our own money. As of March 31, 2017, the current Managing Directors and retired principals and their families, as well as employees of Tweedy, Browne had more than $1.1 billion in portfolios combined with or similar to client portfolios, including approximately $128.4 million in the Global Value Fund, $74.3 million in the Value Fund, $7.2 million in the Worldwide High Dividend Yield Value Fund, and $5.6 million in the Global Value Fund II — Currency Unhedged.

    We have tried to make our website informative and encourage you to read about our history and our investment approach. We believe it is important that our investors and clients understand who we are and what we do. In the “About Us ” section, you will learn about our firm, its origins and associations with some of the legends of value investing such as Benjamin Graham, the “father of value investing.” Also, under “Investment Philosophy ,” we describe in detail our investment principles. In the “Research and Reports ” section, you’ll find an archive of quarterly commentaries, annual and semi-annual reports of our mutual funds along with research papers, numerous articles and interviews concerning Tweedy, Browne.

    We welcome your visit and hope you will learn more about investing and our approach to value. We also welcome your suggestions on how we may improve our website and better serve you.

    William H. Browne
    Thomas H. Shrager
    John D. Spears
    Robert Q. Wyckoff, Jr.
    Managing Directors

    The information on this website is intended for U.S. residents only. Tweedy, Browne Global Value Fund, Tweedy, Browne Global Value Fund II Currency Unhedged, Tweedy, Browne Value Fund and Tweedy, Browne Worldwide High Dividend Yield Value Fund are registered only in the United States and the information on this website does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to purchase the Funds, which are not available to persons outside of the United States.

    Current and future portfolio holdings are subject to risk. Investing in foreign securities involves additional risks beyond the risks of investing in U.S. securities markets. These risks include currency fluctuations; political uncertainty; different accounting and financial standards; different regulatory environments; and different market and economic factors in various non-U.S. countries. In addition, the securities of small, less well known companies may be more volatile than those of larger companies. Value investing involves the risk that the market will not recognize a security’s intrinsic value for a long time, or that a security thought to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced when purchased. Dividends are not guaranteed, and a company currently paying dividends may cease paying dividends at any time. Diversification does not guarantee a profit and does not protect against a loss in a declining market. Please refer to the Funds’ prospectus for a description of risk factors associated with investments in securities which may be held by the Funds.

    To view the accompanying prospectus please click on the Prospectus icon which appears at the top of the screen. Tweedy, Browne Global Value Fund, Tweedy, Browne Global Value Fund II Currency Unhedged, Tweedy, Browne Value Fund and Tweedy, Browne Worldwide High Dividend Yield Value Fund are distributed by AMG Distributors, Inc. Member FINRA /SIPC. Certain employees of Tweedy, Browne are registered representatives of AMGDI.

    As reflected herein, in late 2006 the name of the Tweedy, Browne American Value Fund was changed to the Tweedy, Browne Value Fund. This website may contain some historic content that was created before the name change and therefore may still reference the Fund’s name prior to the change in name. Because this material is still thought to be relevant, it is being maintained on the website in its original form. All references to the Tweedy, Browne American Value Fund in these historic documents should now be deemed to refer to the Tweedy, Browne Value Fund.


    Online Investing #sell #a #business

    #investing in stocks

    #

    Online Investing

    About the Online Investing Page:

    Many investors find it more efficient to trade and manage their portfolios online. This requires a fair amount of education and research. Through our Online Investing section, we offer investors everything from the basics to the latest financial tools.

    Investor Resource of the Week

    Analyst Info – This page shows graphical representations of a company’s Consensus Recommendation, Detailed Analyst Recommendation, 12 Month Price Target Range, Earnings Surprise, Momentum (4 Weeks), Detailed Estimates Submitted, Earnings Growth, Price/Earnings, Consensus Earnings Forecasts and PEG Ratio.

    Online Investing Articles

    • Diversification, Planners, and Brokers
      Of course you want your investments to grow. Here are some tips on diversification, choosing a broker and choosing a financial planner.
      Before you can invest for the future, you need to have money put aside for the present. Don’t be forced to liquidate some investments when an emergency arises. Build an emergency fund of three to six months’ living expenses, and you’ll be giving your online investments the best possible chance to grow. Read More
    • Investing in Stock
      Equities have been the road to wealth for many investors, but selecting the right ones for your portfolio is a difficult process. Chasing after the latest hot tip is no better than taping a newspaper stock page to a dartboard and throwing a dart. Take time to do some homework. This article is a good place to start in your search for unbiased advice for investing online. Read More
    • Money Market Comparison Chart
      This chart provides a quick comparison of rates on the three major types of money market accounts — taxable mutual funds, nontaxable mutual funds, and money market deposit accounts. Read More
      Check out our list of high yielding money market accounts and money market mutual funds:
      • Taxable Money Market Mutual Funds
      • Non-Taxable Money Market Mutual Funds
      • Money Market Accounts
    • Margin Trading
      It’s no secret that the advent of credit did wonders to beef up our modern economy, and the stock market has been no exception. While most new online investors buy stock through traditional cash accounts, there is another way. Read More
    • Two Sides to Every Trade
      One of the hardest concepts for a new investor to grasp is the idea that every single trade represents a difference in perception between you and whoever’s on the other side of the transaction. What do you know that the other guy doesn’t? Read More
    • Analyze Mutual Fund and ETF Fees and Expenses
      Fees and expenses can vary widely from fund to fund. Here�s a tool to help you compare how sales loads, fees, commissions, and other fund expenses can affect returns. Even small differences in expenses can make a big difference in your return over time. Read More
    • How to Trade Options
      Stock options are an incredibly versatile online investment flavor. Despite their reputation as an instrument for high-rollers, there are several conservative options strategies almost anyone can employ. Sophisticated investors find options can be highly profitable. Read More
    • Test Your Financial Knowledge
      Today, more than 84 million Americans and countless others around the world invest in the U.S. equities markets, some directly, others through pension plans, mutual funds, and other vehicles. The NASD recently surveyed investors to get an idea of what people know – and what people may not know – about investing. See how you stack up against other investors. Read More

    How Long Until You’re a Millionaire?

    Enter your starting initial amount, monthly contribution and savings interest rate to find out how long it will take until you reach your goal.

    Real-Time
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    Pre-Market
    News

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    Please confirm your selection:

    You have selected to change your default setting for the Quote Search. This will now be your default target page; unless you change your configuration again, or you delete your cookies. Are you sure you want to change your settings?

    We have a favor to ask

    Please disable your ad blocker (or update your settings to ensure that javascript and cookies are enabled), so that we can continue to provide you with the first-rate market news and data you’ve come to expect from us.





    How to Buy McDonald – s Stock – Blog – Saving Advice


    #

    How to Buy McDonald s Stock

    McDonald s is one of the largest companies in the world. The company has locations in just about every country and makes billions of dollars each year. McDonald s does a great job of keeping its customers and stockholders engaged as well. There are constantly new promotions and ideas being launched within the company and, if there s a lag, the McRib can always come back.

    Because MD s is such a popular and successful restaurant many people want to know how to buy McDonald s stock. If you ve never bought stock before, below is a step by step guide on how to buy McDonald s stock.

    How to Buy McDonald s Stock

    There are many ways you can buy McDonalds stock. You can contact your local brokerage or buy it through one of the many online brokerage websites. You can also go through the McDonald s site itself. If you re looking to buy McDonald s stock you may want to check out an online brokerage company.

    Picking the right brokerage company for your needs can be difficult. If you are a more active trader you may want to search for a broker with lower fees, or maybe you are a trader that likes to hold on to their stock and need a company with no transaction fees at all.

    Most online brokerage companies charge a fee of $5 to $10 for handling your investments. You can even begin trading with some more traditional companies like Scottrade, Fidelity and Charles Scwab. The online broker I d recommend for buying McDonald s stock, however, is Ally.

    Ally is a great place to start trading, especially if you re looking at a specific stock. The company prides itself on providing traders with all the tools they need to become a do-it-yourself trader. Another great thing about Ally is that there is no account opening minimum and they keep all of their fees extremely low. You pay a flat $4.95 for Stock and ETF Trades, $0.65 + $4.95 base for Options trading and $1 on bonds (minimum of $10 for bonds trading).

    If you re interested in how to buy McDonald s stock through Ally you ll want to set up an account for yourself. Ally provides research materials and various other tools for all of its traders so if you re feeling overwhelmed, don t worry. They ve got you covered.

    Once you ve set up your account you can begin searching for McDonald s stock and any other stock you may be interested in. You ll want to set up either a one-time purchase of stock or a recurring monthly amount. Currently to stock price of McDonald s is over $150.

    After You Invest

    Once you ve figured out how to buy McDonald s stock you can begin investing elsewhere too. Ally offers its investors great trading options with a plethora of successful companies (and it takes way less time than a traditional broker). Making your first investment is exciting. Remember, even if it is only a little bit every month it is better than nothing at all. Open an Ally Invest account today. your wallet will thank you!

    Have you invested in McDonald s stock? How did you do it?

    People who liked this article also enjoyed:

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    How to Start Investing in Stocks with Only $1, 000 #easy #business

    #investing in stocks

    #

    Start Investing With Only $1,000

    So you have a $1,000 set aside, and you’re ready to enter the world of stock investing. But before you jump head first into the world of stocks and bonds, there are a few things you need to consider. One of the biggest considerations for investors with a minimal amount of funds is not only what to invest in but also how to go about investing. Not long into your investment journey you may find yourself bombarded with minimum deposit restrictions, commissions and the need for diversification, among a myriad of other considerations. In this article, we’ll walk you through getting started as an investor and show you how to maximize your returns by minimizing your costs.

    More from Investopedia:

    What are the account minimums?
    To the inexperienced investor, investing may seem simple enough – all you need to do is go to a brokerage firm and open up an account, right? What you may not know, however, is that all financial institutions have minimum deposit requirements. In other words, they won’t accept your account application unless you deposit a certain amount of money. With a sum as small as $1,000, some firms won’t allow you to open an account.

    Stocks
    Stock brokers come in two flavors: full-service and discount. As the name implies, a full-service broker provides much more in the way of service, but it only deals with higher net worth clients. It’s not unusual to see minimum account sizes of $50,000 and up at full-service brokerages.

    This leaves the $1,000-investor with the option of a discount broker. Discount brokers have considerably lower fees, but don’t expect much in the way of hand-holding. Fees are low because you are in charge of all investment decisions � you can’t call up and ask for investment advice. With $1,000, you are right on the cusp in terms of the minimum deposit. There will be some discount brokers that will take you and others that won’t. You’ll have to shop around.

    You also could purchase shares directly from a company through direct stock purchase plans (DSPPs). But some of these plans have a minimum investment amount restriction, which ranges between $100 and $500.

    With the advent of online trading, there are a number of discount brokers with no (or very low) minimum deposit restrictions. One of the most popular online trading sites is ShareBuilder. You will, however, be faced with other restrictions and see higher fees for certain types of trades. This is something an investor with a $1,000 starting balance should take into account if he or she wants to invest in stocks.

    Mutual Funds and Bonds
    If mutual funds or bonds are investments you would like to make, it is simpler in terms of minimum deposit amounts. Both of these can be purchased through brokerage firms, where similar deposit rules apply as stocks. Mutual funds also can be purchased through your local bank, often for less than $1,000 when you have an existing relationship with the bank.

    If you want to purchase government bonds, this can be done straight from the government through TreasuryDirect. The only restriction here is the minimum purchase amount of a bond, which can range from $100 to $1,000.

    Learn the Costs of Investing

    Commissions
    Before you open an investment account, you must also consider the costs that you will incur from purchasing investments once the account is open. In most cases, every time you purchase an investment, it will cost you money (through commissions). With a limited amount of funds, these transaction fees can really put a dent on your $1,000.

    Investing in stocks can be very costly if you trade constantly, especially with a minimum amount of money available to invest. Every time that you trade stock, either buying or selling, you will incur a trading fee. Trading fees range from the low end of $10 per trade, but can be as high as $30 for some discount brokers. Remember, a trade is an order to purchase shares in one company – if you want to purchase five different stocks at the same time, this is seen as five separate trades and you will be charged for each one.

    Now, imagine that you decide to buy the stocks of those five companies with your $1,000. To do this you will incur $50 in trading costs, which is equivalent to 5% of your $1,000. If you were to fully invest the $1,000, your account would be reduced to $950 after trading costs. This represents a 5% loss, before you investments even have a chance to earn a cent!

    If you were to sell these five stocks, you would once again incur the costs of the trades, which would be another $50. To make the round trip (buying and selling) on these five stocks it would cost you $100, or 10% of your initial deposit amount of $1,000. If your investments don’t earn enough to cover this, you have lost money by just entering and exiting positions.

    Mutual Fund Fees
    There are many fees an investor will incur when investing in mutual funds. One of the most important fees to focus on is the management expense ratio (MER), which is charged by the management team each year based on the amount of assets in the fund. The higher the MER, the worse it is for the fund’s investors. It doesn’t end there: you’ll also see a number of sales charges called “loads” when you buy mutual funds.

    In terms of the beginning investor, the mutual fund fees are actually an advantage relative to the commissions on stocks. The reason for this is that the fees are the same regardless of the amount you invest. So, as long as you have the minimum requirement to open an account, you can invest as little as $50 or $100 per month in a mutual fund. The term for this is called dollar cost averaging (DCA), and it can be a great way to start investing.

    Reduce risk with Diversification
    Diversification is considered to be the only free lunch in investing. (If you are new to this concept, check out Introduction To Diversification, The Importance Of Diversification and A Guide To Portfolio Construction.) In a nutshell, by investing in a range of assets, you reduce the risk of one investment’s performance severely hurting the return of your overall investment. You could think of it as financial jargon for “don’t put all of your eggs in one basket”.

    In terms of diversification, the greatest amount of difficulty in doing this will come from investments in stocks. This was illustrated in the commissions section of the article, where we discussed how the costs of investing in a large number of stocks can be detrimental to the portfolio. With a $1,000 deposit, it is nearly impossible to have a well-diversified portfolio, so be aware that you may need to invest in one or two companies (at the most) to begin with. This will increase your risk.

    This is where the major benefit of mutual funds comes into focus. Mutual funds tend to have a large number of stocks and other investments within the fund, which makes the fund more diversified than a single stock.

    A Small Step Toward a Large Future
    It is possible to invest if you are just starting out with a small amount of money. It’s more complicated than just selecting the right investment (a feat that is difficult enough in itself) and you have to be aware of the restrictions that you face as a new investor.

    You’ll have to do your homework to find the minimum deposit requirements and then compare the commissions to other brokers. Chances are you won’t be able to cost-effectively buy individual stocks and still be diversified with a small amount of money. Given these restrictions, it’s probably worth starting out on your investment journey with mutual funds. However, like all aspects of investing, it’s up to you to do the research and figure out the strategy that suits you best.

    by Chad Langager

    Chad Langager is the Senior Financial Editor for Investopedia.com. Chad graduated from the University of Alberta Business School with a degree in finance.

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    Getting Started With Angel Investing #hot #new #business #ideas

    #small business investors

    #

    Getting Started With Angel Investing

    What it is: Angel investors might be professionals such as doctors or lawyers, former business associates — or better yet, seasoned entrepreneurs interested in helping out the next generation. What matters is that they are wealthy and willing to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars in your business in return for a piece of the action.

    How it works: Generally, the angels need to meet the Securities Exchange Commission s (SEC) definition of accredited investors. They each need to have a net worth of at least $1 million and make $200,000 a year (or $300,000 a year jointly with a spouse).

    Angel investors give you money. You sell them equity in the company, filing the investment raise with the SEC. Angel investments commonly run around $600,000. Most investments rounds also involve multiple investors, thanks to the proliferations of angel groups.

    Upside: Angel investments can be perfect for businesses that are established enough that they are beyond the startup phase, but are still early enough in the game that they need capital to develop a product or fund a marketing strategy.

    Many businesses receiving angel investments already have some revenue, but they need some cash to kick the enterprise to the next level. Not only can an angel investor provide this, but he or she might become an important mentor. Because their money is on the line, they will be highly motivated to see your business succeed.

    Downside: You could be giving away anywhere from 10 to more than 50 percent of your business. On top of that, there s always the risk that your investors will decide that you are the business greatest obstacle to success, and you could get fired from the company you created.

    Angel investors, like venture capitalists, also like to see an end game down the road that will allow them to pocket their winnings, whether it is a public offering or your business getting acquired by another company. You might have to give up running your enterprise before you re done having fun with it.

    How to get it: It used to be that angel investors were wealthy people the business owner knew. Or they might be veteran entrepreneurs who were discovered through old-fashioned networking at the local Chamber of Commerce, the area Small Business Development Center. or a trusted banker, lawyer or accountant.

    These days, though, angel groups are proliferating, offering plenty of mentoring and coaching on top of the money provided.

    The Overland, Kan.-based Angel Capital Association (ACA) has an online listing of angel groups that are members in good standing, as well as organizations affiliated with the ACA.

    Other websites to check out include AngelList and MicroVentures .





    Online investing, equity crowdfunding, business finance: Crowdcube #home #business #ideas #for #women

    #business investment

    #

    DISCLAIMER

    THE MATERIALS YOU ARE SEEKING TO ACCESS ARE BEING MADE AVAILABLE BY THE COMPANY RAISING FINANCE AS IDENTIFIED ABOVE (THE COMPANY ) IN GOOD FAITH AND FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY AND SUBJECT TO THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS. CROWDCUBE CAPITAL LTD IS AUTHORISED BY THE FCA AND CARRIES OUT DUE DILIGENCE ON EACH COMPANY THAT LISTS ON CROWDCUBE AS SET OUT HERE .

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    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #how

    #investor business daily

    #

    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

    Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

    Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

    Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

    Buying Low-Priced Stocks
    What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

    Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

    A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

    Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

    Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

    The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

    Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
    “Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

    While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

    Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

    Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

    More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

    At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

    Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
    Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

    Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

    A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

    Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

    The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

    If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

    Averaging Down
    Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

    For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

    In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

    When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

    Buying Stocks In A Down Market
    Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

    The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

    Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

    When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

    CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
    If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

    For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .





    First Citizens Bank – Banking, Credit Cards, Mortgages, Investing #small #business #finance

    #business online

    #

    JavaScript is required for this site to function properly. Find instructions for how to enable JavaScript here .

    Products designed to help small businesses grow and succeed

    Accounts designed to meet business needs

    Whether you need just the basics or an account with extra features, First Citizens business banking options make it easy to find the right fit for your specific needs.

    Financial options for your business investments

    First Citizens gives you a variety of financing options for equipment. Offering customizable terms, we can also help you easily meet your tax, accounting and business cycle cash flow needs.

    Solutions to streamline your transactions

    With services that make it easier to accept credit and debit card payments and enable you to deposit checks from your office, First Citizens can help improve your transaction efficiency, reduce your costs and boost your bottom line.

    Grow your business, and your community, with an SBA loan

    As a preferred lender of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), First Citizens offers loans designed to help businesses grow. SBA loans can offer advantages over traditional loans, including lower down payments, longer repayment terms, and greater flexibility to use for a variety of businesses and purposes.

    Approved to offer SBA loan products under SBA s Preferred Lender programs.

    A simple, cost-effective payroll solution

    First Citizens Online Payroll can help simplify and streamline your payroll processes, with features that automatically calculate withholdings, taxes and net pay while also initiating direct deposits to your employees.

    Customized options to protect what you ve built

    As an independent insurance agency with more than 80 years of experience helping businesses, First Citizens Insurance Services can customize a risk management program to fit your business, and compare insurance options from a variety of carriers on your behalf.

    Financial solutions to support your growing business

    Commercial Analysis Accounts

    Consolidates your business deposit accounts into a single relationship in order to manage cash flow more effectively.

    From payroll to wire transfers, payables solutions are designed to help you gain greater control of all of your payment transactions for maximum efficiency.

    With solutions that include ACH, eReceivables and Remote Image Deposit, First Citizens can help you streamline the collections process and manage incoming cash.

    Quickly and automatically reconcile all checks paid against your First Citizens checking account to help save you time and money in keeping your records current.

    Industry Specific Expertise

    Our experienced business professionals can provide insight and guidance unique to these specific business sectors.

    Business Insights

    Strategies for improving cash flow

    Learn how to better predict your income and expenses

    Financing your business

    Financial options to support your business success

    Learn how our personal banking products and services can help you minimize costs and maximize your time.

    Learn more

    Project your business cash flow

    Quick Links

    Insurance products are not insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency and are not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by, any bank or bank affiliate.

    * Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.

    2016 First Citizens Bank

    Raleigh – North Hills

    Please Upgrade your browser

    Your Browser Is Not Supported Please Upgrade

    In order to view and use certain First Citizens Bank products, services and webpages, we recommend that you use a current version of one of the following browsers. You can upgrade your existing browser by clicking one of the links below. You will need to restart your computer in order to complete the upgrade.

    We strongly recommend that you upgrade now.

    If you do not upgrade your browser, you may experience functional or display issues on the pages you are attempting to access.

    1. Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.





    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #business

    #investor business daily

    #

    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

    Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

    Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

    Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

    Buying Low-Priced Stocks
    What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

    Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

    A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

    Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

    Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

    The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

    Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
    “Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

    While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

    Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

    Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

    More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

    At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

    Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
    Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

    Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

    A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

    Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

    The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

    If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

    Averaging Down
    Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

    For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

    In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

    When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

    Buying Stocks In A Down Market
    Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

    The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

    Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

    When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

    CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
    If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

    For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .





    Impact – Ethical Investing #home #business #ideas

    #stock market websites

    #

    Debate Mate granted membership of the Social Stock Exchange

    Adviza granted membership of the Social Stock Exchange

    Liverpool and Wirral to pilot Social Stock Exchange

    Secured Home Care granted membership of the Social Stock Exchange

    Your business can make a positive impact

    Your business can make an impact

    The Social Stock Exchange provides a central venue to help investors to easily identify impact companies. by offering them greater visibility, profile and access to capital for high impact debt and equity issues. Where appropriate member companies can also list their securities on the world’s first, dedicated impact market segment which would mean that their securities become eligible for investors to invest in via their SIPP and ISA.

    More connections

    By choosing the Social Stock Exchange, you can connect with likeminded businesses, advisers and investors to achieve an impact that can really make a difference. Our members cover business sectors that range from social, to environmental, to health and to housing – all doing great things in a new way.

    News and Events

    By choosing the Social Stock Exchange you can have access to a wide variety of information and regular updates on impact investing news and investment opportunities on the website, via your desktop, tablet or mobile. Our regular newsletter should ensure you are always up to date. You will also be able to learn about our busy and exciting events programme including our monthly Impact Investor Club events.

    How can we help you raise money?

    How the Social Stock Exchange can help your business

    For pioneering businesses (whether public or private) seeking to deliver social or environmental impact as a core function, we can offer access to a unique, regulated public marketplace and our network of investors, advisers and other impact businesses.

    Member companies making a positive impact

    The latest news from SSX

    London, September 1st, 2016 – the Social Stock Exchange – the UK’s market for impact – has today announced that Debate Mate has been approved as a member following the Read more

    FINANCIAL TIMES A UK retail investor who buys financial advice and investment products from a single mass market investment group will pay fees equal on average to 2.56% of their Read more

    Member News

    Placing, issue of warrants and Convertible Loan Facility

    London, UK. 02 September 2016: ValiRx Plc (AIM: VAL), a life science

    Directorate appointment

    Good Energy Group PLC, which supplies and generates 100% renewable electricity and

    Total Voting Rights

    In conformity with the FCA s Disclosure and Transparency Rules DTR 5.6.1 we

    © 2015 Social Stock Exchange

    The Social Stock Exchange Ltd (FRN: 625231) is an appointed representative of Kession Capital Limited (FRN: 582160) which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the UK.

    This site is provided for informational purposes only by Social Stock Exchange Limited (“SSX”). Although SSX has made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information on this site as at the date of publication, SSX does not give any warranty or representation as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information on this site. Where links exist to external sites, including in relation to supporting exchanges, SSX does not have any control over such sites and does not assume any responsibility for such sites.

    To the fullest extent permitted by law, SSX shall not be liable for any loss or damage arising in any way from or in connection with use of this site or any information provided on this site. The material on this site may not be copied or distributed, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of SSX.

    No information contained on this website constitutes or shall be deemed to constitute an invitation, recommendation or inducement to invest or otherwise deal in the shares or any other securities of any member company of the Social Stock Exchange or to engage in any investment activity, and must not be relied on in connection with any investment decision. If you require advice, please consult your independent professional investment adviser. Your capital is at risk if you invest.

    Throughout our site you will find links to external websites. Although we make every effort to ensure these links are accurate, up to date and relevant, we cannot take responsibility for pages maintained by external providers.





    First Citizens Bank – Banking, Credit Cards, Mortgages, Investing #financial #markets #today

    #business online

    #

    JavaScript is required for this site to function properly. Find instructions for how to enable JavaScript here .

    Products designed to help small businesses grow and succeed

    Accounts designed to meet business needs

    Whether you need just the basics or an account with extra features, First Citizens business banking options make it easy to find the right fit for your specific needs.

    Financial options for your business investments

    First Citizens gives you a variety of financing options for equipment. Offering customizable terms, we can also help you easily meet your tax, accounting and business cycle cash flow needs.

    Solutions to streamline your transactions

    With services that make it easier to accept credit and debit card payments and enable you to deposit checks from your office, First Citizens can help improve your transaction efficiency, reduce your costs and boost your bottom line.

    Grow your business, and your community, with an SBA loan

    As a preferred lender of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), First Citizens offers loans designed to help businesses grow. SBA loans can offer advantages over traditional loans, including lower down payments, longer repayment terms, and greater flexibility to use for a variety of businesses and purposes.

    Approved to offer SBA loan products under SBA s Preferred Lender programs.

    A simple, cost-effective payroll solution

    First Citizens Online Payroll can help simplify and streamline your payroll processes, with features that automatically calculate withholdings, taxes and net pay while also initiating direct deposits to your employees.

    Customized options to protect what you ve built

    As an independent insurance agency with more than 80 years of experience helping businesses, First Citizens Insurance Services can customize a risk management program to fit your business, and compare insurance options from a variety of carriers on your behalf.

    Financial solutions to support your growing business

    Commercial Analysis Accounts

    Consolidates your business deposit accounts into a single relationship in order to manage cash flow more effectively.

    From payroll to wire transfers, payables solutions are designed to help you gain greater control of all of your payment transactions for maximum efficiency.

    With solutions that include ACH, eReceivables and Remote Image Deposit, First Citizens can help you streamline the collections process and manage incoming cash.

    Quickly and automatically reconcile all checks paid against your First Citizens checking account to help save you time and money in keeping your records current.

    Industry Specific Expertise

    Our experienced business professionals can provide insight and guidance unique to these specific business sectors.

    Business Insights

    Strategies for improving cash flow

    Learn how to better predict your income and expenses

    Financing your business

    Financial options to support your business success

    Learn how our personal banking products and services can help you minimize costs and maximize your time.

    Learn more

    Project your business cash flow

    Quick Links

    Insurance products are not insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency and are not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by, any bank or bank affiliate.

    * Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.

    2016 First Citizens Bank

    Raleigh – North Hills

    Please Upgrade your browser

    Your Browser Is Not Supported Please Upgrade

    In order to view and use certain First Citizens Bank products, services and webpages, we recommend that you use a current version of one of the following browsers. You can upgrade your existing browser by clicking one of the links below. You will need to restart your computer in order to complete the upgrade.

    We strongly recommend that you upgrade now.

    If you do not upgrade your browser, you may experience functional or display issues on the pages you are attempting to access.

    1. Upon clicking this link, you will leave the First Citizens Bank website and go to a third party site. Third party sites may have a privacy policy different from First Citizens Bank and may provide less security than this site. First Citizens Bank and its affiliates are not responsible for the products, services, and content on any third party website.





    Online Investing #loan #business

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    Online Investing

    About the Online Investing Page:

    Many investors find it more efficient to trade and manage their portfolios online. This requires a fair amount of education and research. Through our Online Investing section, we offer investors everything from the basics to the latest financial tools.

    Investor Resource of the Week

    Analyst Info – This page shows graphical representations of a company’s Consensus Recommendation, Detailed Analyst Recommendation, 12 Month Price Target Range, Earnings Surprise, Momentum (4 Weeks), Detailed Estimates Submitted, Earnings Growth, Price/Earnings, Consensus Earnings Forecasts and PEG Ratio.

    Online Investing Articles

    • Diversification, Planners, and Brokers
      Of course you want your investments to grow. Here are some tips on diversification, choosing a broker and choosing a financial planner.
      Before you can invest for the future, you need to have money put aside for the present. Don’t be forced to liquidate some investments when an emergency arises. Build an emergency fund of three to six months’ living expenses, and you’ll be giving your online investments the best possible chance to grow. Read More
    • Investing in Stock
      Equities have been the road to wealth for many investors, but selecting the right ones for your portfolio is a difficult process. Chasing after the latest hot tip is no better than taping a newspaper stock page to a dartboard and throwing a dart. Take time to do some homework. This article is a good place to start in your search for unbiased advice for investing online. Read More
    • Money Market Comparison Chart
      This chart provides a quick comparison of rates on the three major types of money market accounts — taxable mutual funds, nontaxable mutual funds, and money market deposit accounts. Read More
      Check out our list of high yielding money market accounts and money market mutual funds:
      • Taxable Money Market Mutual Funds
      • Non-Taxable Money Market Mutual Funds
      • Money Market Accounts
    • Margin Trading
      It’s no secret that the advent of credit did wonders to beef up our modern economy, and the stock market has been no exception. While most new online investors buy stock through traditional cash accounts, there is another way. Read More
    • Two Sides to Every Trade
      One of the hardest concepts for a new investor to grasp is the idea that every single trade represents a difference in perception between you and whoever’s on the other side of the transaction. What do you know that the other guy doesn’t? Read More
    • Analyze Mutual Fund and ETF Fees and Expenses
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    • How to Trade Options
      Stock options are an incredibly versatile online investment flavor. Despite their reputation as an instrument for high-rollers, there are several conservative options strategies almost anyone can employ. Sophisticated investors find options can be highly profitable. Read More
    • Test Your Financial Knowledge
      Today, more than 84 million Americans and countless others around the world invest in the U.S. equities markets, some directly, others through pension plans, mutual funds, and other vehicles. The NASD recently surveyed investors to get an idea of what people know – and what people may not know – about investing. See how you stack up against other investors. Read More

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    How to Start Investing in Stocks with Only $1, 000 #current #stock

    #investing in stocks

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    Start Investing With Only $1,000

    So you have a $1,000 set aside, and you’re ready to enter the world of stock investing. But before you jump head first into the world of stocks and bonds, there are a few things you need to consider. One of the biggest considerations for investors with a minimal amount of funds is not only what to invest in but also how to go about investing. Not long into your investment journey you may find yourself bombarded with minimum deposit restrictions, commissions and the need for diversification, among a myriad of other considerations. In this article, we’ll walk you through getting started as an investor and show you how to maximize your returns by minimizing your costs.

    More from Investopedia:

    What are the account minimums?
    To the inexperienced investor, investing may seem simple enough – all you need to do is go to a brokerage firm and open up an account, right? What you may not know, however, is that all financial institutions have minimum deposit requirements. In other words, they won’t accept your account application unless you deposit a certain amount of money. With a sum as small as $1,000, some firms won’t allow you to open an account.

    Stocks
    Stock brokers come in two flavors: full-service and discount. As the name implies, a full-service broker provides much more in the way of service, but it only deals with higher net worth clients. It’s not unusual to see minimum account sizes of $50,000 and up at full-service brokerages.

    This leaves the $1,000-investor with the option of a discount broker. Discount brokers have considerably lower fees, but don’t expect much in the way of hand-holding. Fees are low because you are in charge of all investment decisions � you can’t call up and ask for investment advice. With $1,000, you are right on the cusp in terms of the minimum deposit. There will be some discount brokers that will take you and others that won’t. You’ll have to shop around.

    You also could purchase shares directly from a company through direct stock purchase plans (DSPPs). But some of these plans have a minimum investment amount restriction, which ranges between $100 and $500.

    With the advent of online trading, there are a number of discount brokers with no (or very low) minimum deposit restrictions. One of the most popular online trading sites is ShareBuilder. You will, however, be faced with other restrictions and see higher fees for certain types of trades. This is something an investor with a $1,000 starting balance should take into account if he or she wants to invest in stocks.

    Mutual Funds and Bonds
    If mutual funds or bonds are investments you would like to make, it is simpler in terms of minimum deposit amounts. Both of these can be purchased through brokerage firms, where similar deposit rules apply as stocks. Mutual funds also can be purchased through your local bank, often for less than $1,000 when you have an existing relationship with the bank.

    If you want to purchase government bonds, this can be done straight from the government through TreasuryDirect. The only restriction here is the minimum purchase amount of a bond, which can range from $100 to $1,000.

    Learn the Costs of Investing

    Commissions
    Before you open an investment account, you must also consider the costs that you will incur from purchasing investments once the account is open. In most cases, every time you purchase an investment, it will cost you money (through commissions). With a limited amount of funds, these transaction fees can really put a dent on your $1,000.

    Investing in stocks can be very costly if you trade constantly, especially with a minimum amount of money available to invest. Every time that you trade stock, either buying or selling, you will incur a trading fee. Trading fees range from the low end of $10 per trade, but can be as high as $30 for some discount brokers. Remember, a trade is an order to purchase shares in one company – if you want to purchase five different stocks at the same time, this is seen as five separate trades and you will be charged for each one.

    Now, imagine that you decide to buy the stocks of those five companies with your $1,000. To do this you will incur $50 in trading costs, which is equivalent to 5% of your $1,000. If you were to fully invest the $1,000, your account would be reduced to $950 after trading costs. This represents a 5% loss, before you investments even have a chance to earn a cent!

    If you were to sell these five stocks, you would once again incur the costs of the trades, which would be another $50. To make the round trip (buying and selling) on these five stocks it would cost you $100, or 10% of your initial deposit amount of $1,000. If your investments don’t earn enough to cover this, you have lost money by just entering and exiting positions.

    Mutual Fund Fees
    There are many fees an investor will incur when investing in mutual funds. One of the most important fees to focus on is the management expense ratio (MER), which is charged by the management team each year based on the amount of assets in the fund. The higher the MER, the worse it is for the fund’s investors. It doesn’t end there: you’ll also see a number of sales charges called “loads” when you buy mutual funds.

    In terms of the beginning investor, the mutual fund fees are actually an advantage relative to the commissions on stocks. The reason for this is that the fees are the same regardless of the amount you invest. So, as long as you have the minimum requirement to open an account, you can invest as little as $50 or $100 per month in a mutual fund. The term for this is called dollar cost averaging (DCA), and it can be a great way to start investing.

    Reduce risk with Diversification
    Diversification is considered to be the only free lunch in investing. (If you are new to this concept, check out Introduction To Diversification, The Importance Of Diversification and A Guide To Portfolio Construction.) In a nutshell, by investing in a range of assets, you reduce the risk of one investment’s performance severely hurting the return of your overall investment. You could think of it as financial jargon for “don’t put all of your eggs in one basket”.

    In terms of diversification, the greatest amount of difficulty in doing this will come from investments in stocks. This was illustrated in the commissions section of the article, where we discussed how the costs of investing in a large number of stocks can be detrimental to the portfolio. With a $1,000 deposit, it is nearly impossible to have a well-diversified portfolio, so be aware that you may need to invest in one or two companies (at the most) to begin with. This will increase your risk.

    This is where the major benefit of mutual funds comes into focus. Mutual funds tend to have a large number of stocks and other investments within the fund, which makes the fund more diversified than a single stock.

    A Small Step Toward a Large Future
    It is possible to invest if you are just starting out with a small amount of money. It’s more complicated than just selecting the right investment (a feat that is difficult enough in itself) and you have to be aware of the restrictions that you face as a new investor.

    You’ll have to do your homework to find the minimum deposit requirements and then compare the commissions to other brokers. Chances are you won’t be able to cost-effectively buy individual stocks and still be diversified with a small amount of money. Given these restrictions, it’s probably worth starting out on your investment journey with mutual funds. However, like all aspects of investing, it’s up to you to do the research and figure out the strategy that suits you best.

    by Chad Langager

    Chad Langager is the Senior Financial Editor for Investopedia.com. Chad graduated from the University of Alberta Business School with a degree in finance.

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    How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 #best #small #business

    #investing in stocks

    #

    How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 – TheStreet

    Stocks are an equity investment that represents part ownership in a corporation and entitles you to part of that corporation’s earnings and assets.

    Common stock gives shareholders voting rights but no guarantee of dividend payments. Preferred stocks provides no voting rights but usually guarantees a dividend payment.

    In the past, shareholders received a paper stock certificate — called a security — verifying the number of shares they owned. Today, share ownership is usually recorded electronically, and the shares are held in street name by your brokerage firm.

    Investing in stocks can be tricky business. In fact, it’s best to treat all of your investment pursuits as a business. Heck, that’s what Benjamin Graham (Warren Buffett’s stock market mentor) recommended.

    Before you buy your first stock, you should master the basics of stock investing. This won’t make you a great investor overnight, but only when you understand the fundamentals of investing can you learn how to invest in stocks with confidence.

    If you found this content useful, please share it. This will help us create more educational guides for investors.

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    Wells Fargo Small Business – Online and Business Banking, Lending and Investing

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    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #home

    #investor business daily

    #

    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

    Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

    Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

    Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

    Buying Low-Priced Stocks
    What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

    Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

    A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

    Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

    Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

    The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

    Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
    “Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

    While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

    Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

    Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

    More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

    At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

    Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
    Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

    Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

    A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

    Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

    The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

    If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

    Averaging Down
    Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

    For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

    In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

    When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

    Buying Stocks In A Down Market
    Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

    The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

    Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

    When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

    CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
    If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

    For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .





    Online investing, equity crowdfunding, business finance: Crowdcube #fox #news #business

    #business investment

    #

    DISCLAIMER

    THE MATERIALS YOU ARE SEEKING TO ACCESS ARE BEING MADE AVAILABLE BY THE COMPANY RAISING FINANCE AS IDENTIFIED ABOVE (THE COMPANY ) IN GOOD FAITH AND FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY AND SUBJECT TO THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS. CROWDCUBE CAPITAL LTD IS AUTHORISED BY THE FCA AND CARRIES OUT DUE DILIGENCE ON EACH COMPANY THAT LISTS ON CROWDCUBE AS SET OUT HERE .

    This investment opportunity is not an offer to the public and is only available to registered members of Crowdcube.com who have qualified and categorised themselves as able to invest. The investment opportunity is not directed at persons located in the United States, Canada or Japan. Any person resident outside the United Kingdom who wishes to view these materials must first satisfy themselves that they are not subject to any local requirements that prohibit or restrict access.

    In particular, unless otherwise determined by the Company and permitted by applicable law and regulation, it is not intended, subject to certain exceptions, that any offering of the securities mentioned in such materials (the Securities ) by the Company would be made, or any documentation be sent in or into, the United States, Canada or Japan. There will be no public offering of the Securities in the United States.

    In order to access the pitch you must first become a qualifying member of Crowdcube on the basis of your status as either (i) self-certified high net worth investor , (ii) certified sophisticated investor , (iii) self-certified as a sophisticated investor or (iv) certified as a restricted investor , in each case in accordance with the FCA s Conduct of Business Sourcebook Chapter 4.7. Potential investors are encouraged to cross examine the Company by interactive due diligence and use of the available online forums to bring the wisdom of the crowd to bear. Accessing the pitch also means you agree to Crowdcube s most recent website terms and conditions and investor terms and conditions. which include Crowdcube s limitation of liability.

    If you are not permitted to view materials on this webpage or are in any doubt as to whether you are permitted to view these materials, please exit this webpage. Crowdcube s or the Issuer s press announcements and this information page do not constitute an offer to sell securities of the Company. Further, it does not constitute a recommendation by the Company, Crowdcube or any other party to sell or buy securities in the Company.

    By registering or logging into Crowdcube.com to view the investment opportunity, you certify that you are legally entitled to view the investment opportunities, are an authorised investor and you agree to all applicable terms and conditions on this website, including this disclaimer.





    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #selling

    #investor business daily

    #

    Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

    Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

    Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

    Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

    Buying Low-Priced Stocks
    What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

    Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

    A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

    Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

    Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

    The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

    Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
    “Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

    While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

    Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

    Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

    More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

    At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

    Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
    Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

    Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

    A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

    Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

    The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

    If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

    Averaging Down
    Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

    For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

    In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

    When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

    Buying Stocks In A Down Market
    Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

    The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

    Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

    When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

    CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
    If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

    For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .





    Online investing, equity crowdfunding, business finance: Crowdcube #current #business #news

    #business investment

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    Impact – Ethical Investing #current #stock #prices

    #stock market websites

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    Debate Mate granted membership of the Social Stock Exchange

    Adviza granted membership of the Social Stock Exchange

    Liverpool and Wirral to pilot Social Stock Exchange

    Secured Home Care granted membership of the Social Stock Exchange

    Your business can make a positive impact

    Your business can make an impact

    The Social Stock Exchange provides a central venue to help investors to easily identify impact companies. by offering them greater visibility, profile and access to capital for high impact debt and equity issues. Where appropriate member companies can also list their securities on the world’s first, dedicated impact market segment which would mean that their securities become eligible for investors to invest in via their SIPP and ISA.

    More connections

    By choosing the Social Stock Exchange, you can connect with likeminded businesses, advisers and investors to achieve an impact that can really make a difference. Our members cover business sectors that range from social, to environmental, to health and to housing – all doing great things in a new way.

    News and Events

    By choosing the Social Stock Exchange you can have access to a wide variety of information and regular updates on impact investing news and investment opportunities on the website, via your desktop, tablet or mobile. Our regular newsletter should ensure you are always up to date. You will also be able to learn about our busy and exciting events programme including our monthly Impact Investor Club events.

    How can we help you raise money?

    How the Social Stock Exchange can help your business

    For pioneering businesses (whether public or private) seeking to deliver social or environmental impact as a core function, we can offer access to a unique, regulated public marketplace and our network of investors, advisers and other impact businesses.

    Member companies making a positive impact

    The latest news from SSX

    London, September 1st, 2016 – the Social Stock Exchange – the UK’s market for impact – has today announced that Debate Mate has been approved as a member following the Read more

    FINANCIAL TIMES A UK retail investor who buys financial advice and investment products from a single mass market investment group will pay fees equal on average to 2.56% of their Read more

    Member News

    Placing, issue of warrants and Convertible Loan Facility

    London, UK. 02 September 2016: ValiRx Plc (AIM: VAL), a life science

    Directorate appointment

    Good Energy Group PLC, which supplies and generates 100% renewable electricity and

    Total Voting Rights

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    How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #small

    #investment ideas

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    Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

    How to Invest in Stocks

    So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

    Swing Trader

    A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

    Value Investing

    A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

    Growth Investing

    Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

    Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

    Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

    Deciding What to Invest In

    You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

    Research ETFs

    Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

    Choose Sectors

    Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

    Stay Informed

    Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

    Types of Investments


    Bonds

    Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

    Mutual Funds

    Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

    Small-Cap Stocks

    Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

    Large-Cap Stocks

    Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

    Penny Stocks

    Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

    Finding Good Stocks to Buy

    Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


    Liquidity

    It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

    Price

    Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

    Investment Ideas

    Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

    Warren Buffet

    Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

    Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

    Peter Lynch

    Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

    Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

    Good research pays off

    Shut out market noise

    Invest for the long term

    Philip Fisher

    Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

    When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

    Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

    Here are some best performing stocks of 2015: