How Do I Know If I – m Qualified to Be a

#business analyst

#

How Do I Know If I m Qualified to Be a Business Analyst?

Are you exploring a career in as a business analyst? Do you find yourself wondering if your skills and experience are relevant to a business analyst role? Would you be interested in learning about how qualified you are to be a business analyst?

We re going to talk about how to know if you are qualified to be a business analyst, but first I m going to share a funny story with you.

(Before I forget, I want to be sure you know about my step-by-step BA career planning course (it’s free) that’s designed to help you, the mid-career professional, kick-start your business analysis career. The course will help you dig deeper into each of the concepts outlined below.)

Just last week, the night before my birthday, I walked down the short flight of stairs after putting our daughter to bed. I smiled at my husband. He was making an odd expression. I continued to look more deeply at him to figure out why.

I walked over to where he was sitting and said, What s that goofy face for?

He says, You didn t see it, did you?

Me: See what?

He shifts his eyes back toward the stairs. On the ledge we have right in front of our stairway were a dozen yellow roses laying out in plain sight.

I couldn t believe I had completely missed them. For a split second, I even starting thinking that just maybe my husband tele-ported them there, but then I remembered the laws of physics and found my own eyes to be the culprit.

I was looking at my husband and his funny expression instead of what was right in front of me.

This same sort of thing happens to all of us, all of the time. We often don t see what can be obvious to other people or even what other people expect we should obviously be seeing. In all the work I do with professionals transitioning into the BA profession, the most prevalent problem I see is that they overlook significant relevant and transferable skills from their own career background.

As a result, their answer to the question, Am I qualified to be a business analyst? is a resounding no when it should be a yes or at least a some of the time . (And as we ll see in a bit, some of the time can be a very effective path to business analysis.)

Today, I d like to help you see the bouquet of roses waiting for you on the ledge at the bottom of the stairs. And to do that we need to look at the concept of transferable skills.

What are Transferable Business Analyst Skills?

Transferable skills are skills that you’ve built through experiences in your past roles. In the context of business analysis, transferable skills are BA techniques you’ve used in non-BA jobs or soft skills you’ve developed in perhaps unrelated roles.

Transferable skills can help you skip past entry-level business analyst positions. This is especially important because there tend to be very few entry-level business analyst positions. And those savored few entry-level positions tend to favor recent college graduates without the salary requirements of an experienced professional.

If you do have even a few years of professional experience, and a fair amount of the 42 reasons to become a business analyst resonate with you, then you have transferable skills. Getting clear and confident about them is part of your path to success as a business analyst and figuring out what roles you qualify for.

But What Business Analyst Qualifications Are Transferable?

When transitioning to business analysis, there are many areas in which to look for your business analyst qualifications. A good first step is to review our list of core business analysis skills that are important for a new business analyst and start mapping your experience to these skill areas.

Here s a rundown of what you can expect to find during this process:

  • The core business analyst skills. those you might find mapped out in the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge® (BABOK®). will help you get past the screening process for a business analyst role. Any given hiring manager tends to have a checklist of key qualifications they absolutely want to have met by a potential candidate. And even if your experience is informal. it s likely that you can map it to a more formal deliverable or analysis technique. Use the BA terms (appropriately) in your resume and in a job interview and you ll increase your chances of qualifying yourself for a business analyst role.
  • Although managers screen for a specific set of core business analyst skills, they often hire for soft skills. such as relationship-building and the ability to communicate with a diverse set of stakeholders from the business and technical communities. Understanding the key soft skills you bring to the table is critical. Being able to speak to specific experiences where you used those soft skills in a BA context (or close to BA context) can increase the number of BA jobs you ll qualify for.
  • Then there will be skills that set you apart as a candidate and qualify you for specific types of BA positions. These vary widely from technical skills, to specific business domain knowledge, to experience with specific types of business applications.

What Do I Do with My List of Business Analyst Qualifications?

Even with a list of transferable business analyst qualifications in hand, a transitioning BA can get understandably frustrated. What business analyst roles do these skills qualify you for? It can often seem as if the grass is greener on the other side of the proverbial fence .

  • If you don t have an IT background, it can seem as if every possible BA job you look at requires some obscure technical skill you have no interest in building.
  • If you do have an IT background, but no business experience, it can see as if every possible BA job you look at requires business domain experience.

While you will most likely find that the number of roles you aren t qualified for outweigh the number of roles you do qualify for, your career background will qualify you very strongly for a specific set business analyst jobs .

  • If you have a technical background. consider BA roles that include systems analysis responsibilities or blend selected IT duties with a business analyst role. Your experience with specific technologies could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have a business background from a specific functional area (such as customer service, human resources, or finance), consider BA roles working on the business applications with which you are familiar or supporting this area of the company. Your familiarity with the terminology and processes for that functional area could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have deep experience in a specific industry. consider business analyst roles in that industry. Your understanding of the industry environment, terminology, and core processes could qualify you for specific BA roles.

To sum things up, the answer to the question about whether or not you are qualified to be a business analyst requires a bit of analysis. First, you must discover your business analyst skills. Then you want to map them to the types of roles you see in your local job market. Most likely, you will find yourself to be very qualified for some roles, partially qualified for others, and not at all qualified for still others (and this last set will most likely be the biggest, and that s true even for BAs with formal experience).

With this information in hand, you can decide how and if to move forward in your BA career. And keep in mind, just like those I work with on their career transitions, it s quite possible and actually very likely that you have more relevant experience than you think, and you won t realize what those qualifications are until you go through a skills discovery process .

Find Your Path Into a Business Analyst Career

After reading and working through the exercises in How to Start a Business Analyst Career. you’ll know how to assess and expand your business analysis skills and experience.

This book will help you find your best path forward into a business analyst career. More than that, you will know exactly what to do next to expand your business analysis opportunities.

Click here to learn more about How to Start a Business Analyst Career

Stay informed about new articles and course offerings.




How Do I Know If I – m Qualified to Be a

#business analyst

#

How Do I Know If I m Qualified to Be a Business Analyst?

Are you exploring a career in as a business analyst? Do you find yourself wondering if your skills and experience are relevant to a business analyst role? Would you be interested in learning about how qualified you are to be a business analyst?

We re going to talk about how to know if you are qualified to be a business analyst, but first I m going to share a funny story with you.

(Before I forget, I want to be sure you know about my step-by-step BA career planning course (it’s free) that’s designed to help you, the mid-career professional, kick-start your business analysis career. The course will help you dig deeper into each of the concepts outlined below.)

Just last week, the night before my birthday, I walked down the short flight of stairs after putting our daughter to bed. I smiled at my husband. He was making an odd expression. I continued to look more deeply at him to figure out why.

I walked over to where he was sitting and said, What s that goofy face for?

He says, You didn t see it, did you?

Me: See what?

He shifts his eyes back toward the stairs. On the ledge we have right in front of our stairway were a dozen yellow roses laying out in plain sight.

I couldn t believe I had completely missed them. For a split second, I even starting thinking that just maybe my husband tele-ported them there, but then I remembered the laws of physics and found my own eyes to be the culprit.

I was looking at my husband and his funny expression instead of what was right in front of me.

This same sort of thing happens to all of us, all of the time. We often don t see what can be obvious to other people or even what other people expect we should obviously be seeing. In all the work I do with professionals transitioning into the BA profession, the most prevalent problem I see is that they overlook significant relevant and transferable skills from their own career background.

As a result, their answer to the question, Am I qualified to be a business analyst? is a resounding no when it should be a yes or at least a some of the time . (And as we ll see in a bit, some of the time can be a very effective path to business analysis.)

Today, I d like to help you see the bouquet of roses waiting for you on the ledge at the bottom of the stairs. And to do that we need to look at the concept of transferable skills.

What are Transferable Business Analyst Skills?

Transferable skills are skills that you’ve built through experiences in your past roles. In the context of business analysis, transferable skills are BA techniques you’ve used in non-BA jobs or soft skills you’ve developed in perhaps unrelated roles.

Transferable skills can help you skip past entry-level business analyst positions. This is especially important because there tend to be very few entry-level business analyst positions. And those savored few entry-level positions tend to favor recent college graduates without the salary requirements of an experienced professional.

If you do have even a few years of professional experience, and a fair amount of the 42 reasons to become a business analyst resonate with you, then you have transferable skills. Getting clear and confident about them is part of your path to success as a business analyst and figuring out what roles you qualify for.

But What Business Analyst Qualifications Are Transferable?

When transitioning to business analysis, there are many areas in which to look for your business analyst qualifications. A good first step is to review our list of core business analysis skills that are important for a new business analyst and start mapping your experience to these skill areas.

Here s a rundown of what you can expect to find during this process:

  • The core business analyst skills. those you might find mapped out in the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge® (BABOK®). will help you get past the screening process for a business analyst role. Any given hiring manager tends to have a checklist of key qualifications they absolutely want to have met by a potential candidate. And even if your experience is informal. it s likely that you can map it to a more formal deliverable or analysis technique. Use the BA terms (appropriately) in your resume and in a job interview and you ll increase your chances of qualifying yourself for a business analyst role.
  • Although managers screen for a specific set of core business analyst skills, they often hire for soft skills. such as relationship-building and the ability to communicate with a diverse set of stakeholders from the business and technical communities. Understanding the key soft skills you bring to the table is critical. Being able to speak to specific experiences where you used those soft skills in a BA context (or close to BA context) can increase the number of BA jobs you ll qualify for.
  • Then there will be skills that set you apart as a candidate and qualify you for specific types of BA positions. These vary widely from technical skills, to specific business domain knowledge, to experience with specific types of business applications.

What Do I Do with My List of Business Analyst Qualifications?

Even with a list of transferable business analyst qualifications in hand, a transitioning BA can get understandably frustrated. What business analyst roles do these skills qualify you for? It can often seem as if the grass is greener on the other side of the proverbial fence .

  • If you don t have an IT background, it can seem as if every possible BA job you look at requires some obscure technical skill you have no interest in building.
  • If you do have an IT background, but no business experience, it can see as if every possible BA job you look at requires business domain experience.

While you will most likely find that the number of roles you aren t qualified for outweigh the number of roles you do qualify for, your career background will qualify you very strongly for a specific set business analyst jobs .

  • If you have a technical background. consider BA roles that include systems analysis responsibilities or blend selected IT duties with a business analyst role. Your experience with specific technologies could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have a business background from a specific functional area (such as customer service, human resources, or finance), consider BA roles working on the business applications with which you are familiar or supporting this area of the company. Your familiarity with the terminology and processes for that functional area could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have deep experience in a specific industry. consider business analyst roles in that industry. Your understanding of the industry environment, terminology, and core processes could qualify you for specific BA roles.

To sum things up, the answer to the question about whether or not you are qualified to be a business analyst requires a bit of analysis. First, you must discover your business analyst skills. Then you want to map them to the types of roles you see in your local job market. Most likely, you will find yourself to be very qualified for some roles, partially qualified for others, and not at all qualified for still others (and this last set will most likely be the biggest, and that s true even for BAs with formal experience).

With this information in hand, you can decide how and if to move forward in your BA career. And keep in mind, just like those I work with on their career transitions, it s quite possible and actually very likely that you have more relevant experience than you think, and you won t realize what those qualifications are until you go through a skills discovery process .

Find Your Path Into a Business Analyst Career

After reading and working through the exercises in How to Start a Business Analyst Career. you’ll know how to assess and expand your business analysis skills and experience.

This book will help you find your best path forward into a business analyst career. More than that, you will know exactly what to do next to expand your business analysis opportunities.

Click here to learn more about How to Start a Business Analyst Career

Stay informed about new articles and course offerings.




NH Real Estate Appraiser – Jack Lavoie, SRA – Accurate Appraisal Services


#

Residential – Commercial – Consulting – Expert Witness

Professional, high quality, appraisal and valuation services for lenders, attorneys, homeowners, broker, corporations and more.

Jack Lavoie SRA. a designated member of the Appraisal Institute is one of the most respected and knowledgeable real estate and appraisal professionals in the Greater Manchester Bedford area, as well as throughout New Hampshire.

Jack’s unmatched experience, education and licensing level (holds a Certified General Appraiser license which is the highest level of licensing available) makes him uniquely qualified to provide you with the services you desire and need. With years of experience behind him and extensive high level training, he is prepared to handle a variety of property types and situations. Complex assignments are his specialty and Jack is the area’s 1st choice for taking on these difficult assingments.

In addition to experience and qualifactions, his service and communication with clients is top-notch. Whether it is an appraisal for divorce, bankruptcy, estate settlement, relocation, or an appraisal in conjunction with selling your home, Jack and his staff will treat it as THE most important appraisal ever. Because it is!.

Click link above

We provide professional appraisal reports, consulting and testimony for:

  • Bankruptcy Appraisals
  • Private Mortgage Insurance Removal
  • Estate Planning
  • Divorce Settlement
  • Tax Assessment Disputes
  • Guardianship appraisals
  • Foreclosure/Pre-Foreclosure
  • Buyers/Pre-Purchase
  • Expert Witness/Litigation
  • Cell Tower/Power Line Impact
  • Tax Abatements
  • Retrospective Valuations
  • Employee Relocation (ERC)
  • Estate Settlement
  • REO Valuations
  • Litigation
  • FHA 203K
  • Abutter impact
  • Sellers/Pre-Listing
  • Commerial/Investment

Attn Mobile User: The “Order an appraisal”, “Services” and “Ask Jack” links below are not currently working. Our web provider is actively working on this. To order an appraisal click the blue Order an Appraisal button above.

Our Commitment to You

As I have discussed earler, real estate values are not linear. Each year in New Hampshire, prices change and follow a predictable path like the graph illustrates. Prices rise in the spring, level off in the summer and early fall and decline in the late fall and winter. Check out “North End” Manchester as of […]. Read More

Even in years where the market seems stable, property values fluctuate over the course of the year. Historically, values increase in the spring and early summer, stabilize in summer and early fall and decrease over the winter season. This is attributed to several factors such as the “holiday season” and the harsh cold winters we […]. Read More

Tax abatements, Obtaining a Divorce Appraisal, “Does recessed lighting add value” and should I wait until spring to sell”? Home seller: Should I wait until spring to sell my house” (note: this person is located in Greater Manchester, NH) Jack: If your house is prepared to sell (cleaned, repaired. Read More

Try this short quiz to see which 2016 Presidential candidate you side with… http://www.isidewith.com/elections/2016-presidential-quiz?from=ThmUutAnS Jack Lavoie, SRA Designated member Appraisal Institute Accurate Appraisal Services a division of Jack Lavoie Real Estate, LLC 62 Quincy Drive Bedford, NH 03110 Office: (603) 644-1000 http://www.j. Read More


How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor #business #bank #accounts

#business advisor

#

How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor

Business planning, financial projections, employee management, and customer acquisitions are just a few of the issues that small business owners wrestle with. Startups and fast-growing companies have even more challenges — and that’s where a business advisor is most valuable. Whether they’re helping with starting a new business or managing an existing enterprise, small business advisors are seasoned professionals that help with strategic business planning and crucial operational decisions.

Alas, great small business advisors, like great football coaches, are rare. Here are some tips to finding the perfect small business coach, so you can score a few more touchdowns and experience a lot fewer fumbles:

1) Look for an advisor who’s managed a small business – Small businesses are a different animal than large corporations. Find a business coach that understands the special challenges of small business, including recruiting and retaining employees, capital funding, product marketing, and keeping up with technology. Additionally, target an advisor who had success with your biggest business challenge. For instance, if your main roadblock is distribution, target an advisor who is a distribution channels expert.

2) Look for an advisor with credentials – A business advisor doesn’t necessarily need credentials, a special license, or a degree to give his opinion on how you should run your business, but it doesn’t hurt. Because anyone can set up shop as an advisor, look for someone with a business degree, MBA, or other coaching credentials such as CPCP (Certified Professional Coach Program), ACC (Associate Certified Coach), PCC (Professional Certified Coach), or MCC (Master Certified Coach) for added peace of mind that you’re getting good advice.

3) Choose an advisor who focuses on your niche – An advisor that specializes in your industry will speak your language, understand your business concerns, and know the competitive umbrella your business operates under. If you’re lucky, he’ll have some great industry contacts too.

4) Find an advisor through SCORE – SCORE Counselors to America’s Small Business is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to educate entrepreneurially-minded individuals nationwide in the creation, growth, and success of small businesses. With over 11,200 volunteers nationwide, SCORE offers free help with small business planning and other advice. Find a SCORE advisor through the website’s handy search function or visit your local SCORE office.

5) Check out the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches (WABC) – Founded in 1997, the WABC is an international association aimed at the leadership and development of worldwide business coaching. The WABC requires rigorous membership requirements based upon coaching experience, references, and business expertise. With over 1,000 business coaches spanning 30 countries, the WABC is a great advisory resource.

6) Search BusinessAdviser – BusinessAdviser.com is an independent consultancy international businesses directory. Search by location, firm or specialty.

7) Ask for referrals – Last but not least, ask your mentors, work associates, and members of social networks who they have used and would recommend in a business advisor capacity.

Liked this article? We think you will enjoy these recommendations.





Las Vegas Active Adult Living – Las Vegas Senior Communities – Active


#

Specializing in Las Vegas’ Active Adult Communities, Age Restricted and Retirement Communities, we help people every day find a home in a Las Vegas retirement community that fits their living needs. From golf course property to strip views, homes in an active adult community can be just about anything you want them to be. And we’ll find the right Las Vegas home for you. There are many age restricted communities in the Las Vegas valley to choose from and we know all the neighborhoods. Now that the Baby Boomers are coming of age, active adult communities are becoming more popular than ever. They’re no longer just Las Vegas retirement communities. They’re communities to live, play and socialize. It’s senior living at it’s best. It’s a lifestyle.

The Las Vegas area is home to many age qualified (55 plus) communities, many of which offer recreational facilities, golf courses, clubs, restaurants and so much more.

Puelte / Del Webb a builder known for its Sun City Las Vegas communities and has 4 such neighborhoods here in the valley. Sun City Summerlin the largest and most established on the westside of town, Sun City MacDonald Ranch a community of about 2400 homes in the City Of Henderson, Sun City Aliante the newest of the communities in North Las Vegas and Sun City Anthem 7200 beautiful homes in the foothills of the City Of Henderson. On a smaller scale Del Webb has also built 2 communities called Solera On the south end of town it’s Solera at Anthem and on the eastside Solera at Stallion Mountain. both great neighborhoods for the active person over 55 years of age. If you are interested in purchasing in a Las Vegas retirement commuinty give us a call today. We know the town, We know the neighborhoods.

You’ll want to consider how important it is that your Las Vegas retirement real estate agent be a true full-time professional with extensive and continually expanding knowledge of the market for both resale and new Las Vegas homes. The market for Las Vegas retirement homes is growing and changing at an incredibly rapid rate. With the highest population growth in the U.S. for eleven years running, you need a Las Vegas Realtor who is at the top of his game and puts a premium on the continuing education process in his field. That’s why knowledge, experience and professionalism are necessary to help you make highly-informed decisions about the market for Las Vegas Sun City homes and other Las Vegas retirement communities.

Are you considering the purchase of Las Vegas real estate? As you examine your options in a Las Vegas home or a Las Vegas Retirement condo keep in mind that our Las Vegas Real Estate Team is fully prepared to exceed the expectation of both buyers and sellers of Las Vegas active adult community homes. And if you’re thinking about marketing your residence for sale in any active adult community in Southern Nevada, you’ll want to consider giving us a call, with the substantial Internet-based marketing clout associated with our highly visible Las Vegas real estate website we might already have a buyer for you. Interested in learning more? Just give us a call.

Las Vegas senior communities can provide a place to meet new friends, become or stay as active as you want. If you prefer not to live in an age restricted environment we can help there also. Las Vegas is a great town to live and play. There’s no other city in the world like it, the weather, the entertainment, the low tax base and the low property taxes. We have it all! Las Vegas is a vibrant, growing, exciting city. Come take a closer look. Give us a call

Sun City Summerlin homes community – rated America s best-selling residential master-plan for ten years in a row and is particularly well suited for recreation of every kind. Imagine indulging yourself with activities that four community centers, three golf courses, parks and mile after mile of walking, jogging and biking trails offer. Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area is just 15 minutes from Sun City Summerlin and provides the most scenic and challenging hiking, biking and rock climbing in the Southwest United States. Sun City Summerlin real estate is truly one of the most outstanding options offered for the 55 plus person in the Las Vegas real estate market.

Henderson real estate makes its contribution to the urbanization process sweeping Southern Nevada with a great master-planned community of its own named Anthem. Within its winding roads, beautiful golf courses, walking trails, rolling hills is Sun City Anthem. Offering three community centers, and two of Las Vegas Golf courses Sun City Anthem real estate is some of the most desirable in Las Vegas. Come take a look.

Here at www.RetireLasVegasStyle.com we have earned a reputation for best in Client Satisfaction in quality customer care, professional discretion, ethical standards, and attention to detail that is needed in a Las Vegas Real Estate transaction. Be assured that we will work very hard to earn your trust, loyalty and respect. Our number one goal is to assist you in making sound and well-informed Las Vegas retirement community decisions by giving you all the facts necessary.

Also you can check your auto insurance rates in the Las Vegas Valley at GoExpressAutoInsurance.com

We would like to thank you for this opportunity to present in what we believe to be one the most satisfying and exciting places to live in the world for the active adult senior. Southern Nevada has an incredibly bright future and the market for Las Vegas retirement plays an integral role in this spectacular city. Enjoy our Las Vegas senior community website and don t hesitate to call us with any questions. See you soon.

Request More Information

If you have questions, or would like more information about Las Vegas Senior Real Estate, please leave your name and contact information.


It Takes 6 to 8 Touches to Generate a Viable Sales Lead


#

Today’s marketing and sales landscape looks vastly different from that of just a few decades ago. With the advent of the Internet, blogging, social media, and a myriad of digital communications channels, the path to purchase is not a simple, straight line, but a complex and varied web of twists and turns – and touch points.

Consumers are immune to traditional advertising and marketing strategies

Today’s consumers are also increasingly immune to traditional advertising and sales methodologies, meaning they conduct more independent research and take more convincing before they’re sold on making a purchase. That’s why the buyer’s journey may differ from one consumer to the next; they’re not all listening to the same radio spots to learn about your company.

They’re not even being exposed to the same information about your brand from the same sources. Some may have discovered your company on the social web, while others learned of your products or services through word-of-mouth recommendations. Some may read online reviews before engaging with your marketing team or filling out an online request for more information. Others will visit your website, read your blog, and evaluate your competition before engaging with your company.

A lot of information is needed to qualify a lead as “sales-ready”

What’s more, when leads are passed from marketing to sales, they’re expected to be “sales-ready,” or at the decision-making stage in the buying journey. But the myriad of paths to purchase make it increasingly challenging to effectively qualify leads as sales-ready.

According to the Online Marketing Institute. one reason it takes a multitude of touches to generate a sales-ready lead is the sheer amount of information required to deem a lead sales-ready: Budget, Authority, Need, and Timeframe (BANT). Without understanding what this information means for your company, and having the appropriate number of interactions with prospects to determine sales-readiness.

It often takes several touches for a consumer to make the choice to request information, and even more for marketing to gather the information needed to determine if a lead is ready to be passed to sales. At the early stages in the buyer’s journey, consumers are often merely gathering information and building awareness about your products and services. Often, these interactions are not in-depth enough to provide the information necessary to qualify a lead.

Sales resources are limited and must be optimized

Compared to marketing resources, sales resources and assets are often limited, even scarce. It’s vitally important for sales to optimize the use of these limited resources with the most qualified leads who are most likely to convert to buyers.

When marketing passes on leads that are not yet at the point of purchase, sales spends valuable time and information trying to convert leads who are just not yet ready to make a buying decision. As a result, leads which could have become sales-ready with the proper nurturing at multiple touch points are lost.

What is the prospect looking for? How soon does the prospect plan to make a buying decision? What are the budgetary requirements? Is the contact the individual with decision-making authority? These questions must all be answered, in most cases, to deem a lead sales-ready, and it’s not information that’s easily obtained via a simple web form. Gathering this information takes multiple, positive interactions where marketing representatives have the opportunity to establish trust and rapport, setting the stage for the sales team to close the deal at the appropriate time.

Qualified leads are more likely to convert to buyers

Here’s the thing: Your sales team doesn’t have the time to spend nurturing leads who aren’t yet ready to make a buying decision, nor are they typically equipped with the resources and assets with which to do so. There are dozens of statistics that show time and time again that when the leads passed to sales are qualified, they are far more likely to convert.

The six to eight touches it takes to qualify a lead are crucial components of the lead nurturing process, allowing marketing the opportunity to educate and inform prospects as they move through each stage in the buying journey. These touch points are opportunities to prepare leads for the final stage in the buying journey, the point of decision-making. The better the experience and the more valuable each of these touch points are to leads, the more ready they’ll be to make a buying decision, and the more likely they are to convert to paying customers.

The result is a highly organized, efficient buying journey that runs like a well-oiled machine. When marketing passes qualified, sales-ready leads to the sales department, sales closes more deals in less time. This fosters a positive, rewarding working environment for both sales and marketing, as well as a healthy bottom line for the company.

About the Author

Fergal Glynn is Docurated’s VP of Marketing. Docurated accelerates sales in companies looking for fast growth by making the best marketing content readily available to Sales teams. Fergal helped produce Docurated’s State of Sales Productivity Report. which examines key sales productivity trends and challenges facing sales and marketing executives. Fergal grew up in Ireland and now lives in Arlington, MA. To learn more about Docurated check out their Sales Enablement Tool on the AppExchange.


How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor #business #plan #format

#business advisor

#

How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor

Business planning, financial projections, employee management, and customer acquisitions are just a few of the issues that small business owners wrestle with. Startups and fast-growing companies have even more challenges — and that’s where a business advisor is most valuable. Whether they’re helping with starting a new business or managing an existing enterprise, small business advisors are seasoned professionals that help with strategic business planning and crucial operational decisions.

Alas, great small business advisors, like great football coaches, are rare. Here are some tips to finding the perfect small business coach, so you can score a few more touchdowns and experience a lot fewer fumbles:

1) Look for an advisor who’s managed a small business – Small businesses are a different animal than large corporations. Find a business coach that understands the special challenges of small business, including recruiting and retaining employees, capital funding, product marketing, and keeping up with technology. Additionally, target an advisor who had success with your biggest business challenge. For instance, if your main roadblock is distribution, target an advisor who is a distribution channels expert.

2) Look for an advisor with credentials – A business advisor doesn’t necessarily need credentials, a special license, or a degree to give his opinion on how you should run your business, but it doesn’t hurt. Because anyone can set up shop as an advisor, look for someone with a business degree, MBA, or other coaching credentials such as CPCP (Certified Professional Coach Program), ACC (Associate Certified Coach), PCC (Professional Certified Coach), or MCC (Master Certified Coach) for added peace of mind that you’re getting good advice.

3) Choose an advisor who focuses on your niche – An advisor that specializes in your industry will speak your language, understand your business concerns, and know the competitive umbrella your business operates under. If you’re lucky, he’ll have some great industry contacts too.

4) Find an advisor through SCORE – SCORE Counselors to America’s Small Business is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to educate entrepreneurially-minded individuals nationwide in the creation, growth, and success of small businesses. With over 11,200 volunteers nationwide, SCORE offers free help with small business planning and other advice. Find a SCORE advisor through the website’s handy search function or visit your local SCORE office.

5) Check out the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches (WABC) – Founded in 1997, the WABC is an international association aimed at the leadership and development of worldwide business coaching. The WABC requires rigorous membership requirements based upon coaching experience, references, and business expertise. With over 1,000 business coaches spanning 30 countries, the WABC is a great advisory resource.

6) Search BusinessAdviser – BusinessAdviser.com is an independent consultancy international businesses directory. Search by location, firm or specialty.

7) Ask for referrals – Last but not least, ask your mentors, work associates, and members of social networks who they have used and would recommend in a business advisor capacity.

Liked this article? We think you will enjoy these recommendations.





How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor #financial #markets #today

#business advisor

#

How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor

Business planning, financial projections, employee management, and customer acquisitions are just a few of the issues that small business owners wrestle with. Startups and fast-growing companies have even more challenges — and that’s where a business advisor is most valuable. Whether they’re helping with starting a new business or managing an existing enterprise, small business advisors are seasoned professionals that help with strategic business planning and crucial operational decisions.

Alas, great small business advisors, like great football coaches, are rare. Here are some tips to finding the perfect small business coach, so you can score a few more touchdowns and experience a lot fewer fumbles:

1) Look for an advisor who’s managed a small business – Small businesses are a different animal than large corporations. Find a business coach that understands the special challenges of small business, including recruiting and retaining employees, capital funding, product marketing, and keeping up with technology. Additionally, target an advisor who had success with your biggest business challenge. For instance, if your main roadblock is distribution, target an advisor who is a distribution channels expert.

2) Look for an advisor with credentials – A business advisor doesn’t necessarily need credentials, a special license, or a degree to give his opinion on how you should run your business, but it doesn’t hurt. Because anyone can set up shop as an advisor, look for someone with a business degree, MBA, or other coaching credentials such as CPCP (Certified Professional Coach Program), ACC (Associate Certified Coach), PCC (Professional Certified Coach), or MCC (Master Certified Coach) for added peace of mind that you’re getting good advice.

3) Choose an advisor who focuses on your niche – An advisor that specializes in your industry will speak your language, understand your business concerns, and know the competitive umbrella your business operates under. If you’re lucky, he’ll have some great industry contacts too.

4) Find an advisor through SCORE – SCORE Counselors to America’s Small Business is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to educate entrepreneurially-minded individuals nationwide in the creation, growth, and success of small businesses. With over 11,200 volunteers nationwide, SCORE offers free help with small business planning and other advice. Find a SCORE advisor through the website’s handy search function or visit your local SCORE office.

5) Check out the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches (WABC) – Founded in 1997, the WABC is an international association aimed at the leadership and development of worldwide business coaching. The WABC requires rigorous membership requirements based upon coaching experience, references, and business expertise. With over 1,000 business coaches spanning 30 countries, the WABC is a great advisory resource.

6) Search BusinessAdviser – BusinessAdviser.com is an independent consultancy international businesses directory. Search by location, firm or specialty.

7) Ask for referrals – Last but not least, ask your mentors, work associates, and members of social networks who they have used and would recommend in a business advisor capacity.

Liked this article? We think you will enjoy these recommendations.





How Do I Know If I – m Qualified to Be a

#business analyst

#

How Do I Know If I m Qualified to Be a Business Analyst?

Are you exploring a career in as a business analyst? Do you find yourself wondering if your skills and experience are relevant to a business analyst role? Would you be interested in learning about how qualified you are to be a business analyst?

We re going to talk about how to know if you are qualified to be a business analyst, but first I m going to share a funny story with you.

(Before I forget, I want to be sure you know about my step-by-step BA career planning course (it’s free) that’s designed to help you, the mid-career professional, kick-start your business analysis career. The course will help you dig deeper into each of the concepts outlined below.)

Just last week, the night before my birthday, I walked down the short flight of stairs after putting our daughter to bed. I smiled at my husband. He was making an odd expression. I continued to look more deeply at him to figure out why.

I walked over to where he was sitting and said, What s that goofy face for?

He says, You didn t see it, did you?

Me: See what?

He shifts his eyes back toward the stairs. On the ledge we have right in front of our stairway were a dozen yellow roses laying out in plain sight.

I couldn t believe I had completely missed them. For a split second, I even starting thinking that just maybe my husband tele-ported them there, but then I remembered the laws of physics and found my own eyes to be the culprit.

I was looking at my husband and his funny expression instead of what was right in front of me.

This same sort of thing happens to all of us, all of the time. We often don t see what can be obvious to other people or even what other people expect we should obviously be seeing. In all the work I do with professionals transitioning into the BA profession, the most prevalent problem I see is that they overlook significant relevant and transferable skills from their own career background.

As a result, their answer to the question, Am I qualified to be a business analyst? is a resounding no when it should be a yes or at least a some of the time . (And as we ll see in a bit, some of the time can be a very effective path to business analysis.)

Today, I d like to help you see the bouquet of roses waiting for you on the ledge at the bottom of the stairs. And to do that we need to look at the concept of transferable skills.

What are Transferable Business Analyst Skills?

Transferable skills are skills that you’ve built through experiences in your past roles. In the context of business analysis, transferable skills are BA techniques you’ve used in non-BA jobs or soft skills you’ve developed in perhaps unrelated roles.

Transferable skills can help you skip past entry-level business analyst positions. This is especially important because there tend to be very few entry-level business analyst positions. And those savored few entry-level positions tend to favor recent college graduates without the salary requirements of an experienced professional.

If you do have even a few years of professional experience, and a fair amount of the 42 reasons to become a business analyst resonate with you, then you have transferable skills. Getting clear and confident about them is part of your path to success as a business analyst and figuring out what roles you qualify for.

But What Business Analyst Qualifications Are Transferable?

When transitioning to business analysis, there are many areas in which to look for your business analyst qualifications. A good first step is to review our list of core business analysis skills that are important for a new business analyst and start mapping your experience to these skill areas.

Here s a rundown of what you can expect to find during this process:

  • The core business analyst skills. those you might find mapped out in the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge® (BABOK®). will help you get past the screening process for a business analyst role. Any given hiring manager tends to have a checklist of key qualifications they absolutely want to have met by a potential candidate. And even if your experience is informal. it s likely that you can map it to a more formal deliverable or analysis technique. Use the BA terms (appropriately) in your resume and in a job interview and you ll increase your chances of qualifying yourself for a business analyst role.
  • Although managers screen for a specific set of core business analyst skills, they often hire for soft skills. such as relationship-building and the ability to communicate with a diverse set of stakeholders from the business and technical communities. Understanding the key soft skills you bring to the table is critical. Being able to speak to specific experiences where you used those soft skills in a BA context (or close to BA context) can increase the number of BA jobs you ll qualify for.
  • Then there will be skills that set you apart as a candidate and qualify you for specific types of BA positions. These vary widely from technical skills, to specific business domain knowledge, to experience with specific types of business applications.

What Do I Do with My List of Business Analyst Qualifications?

Even with a list of transferable business analyst qualifications in hand, a transitioning BA can get understandably frustrated. What business analyst roles do these skills qualify you for? It can often seem as if the grass is greener on the other side of the proverbial fence .

  • If you don t have an IT background, it can seem as if every possible BA job you look at requires some obscure technical skill you have no interest in building.
  • If you do have an IT background, but no business experience, it can see as if every possible BA job you look at requires business domain experience.

While you will most likely find that the number of roles you aren t qualified for outweigh the number of roles you do qualify for, your career background will qualify you very strongly for a specific set business analyst jobs .

  • If you have a technical background. consider BA roles that include systems analysis responsibilities or blend selected IT duties with a business analyst role. Your experience with specific technologies could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have a business background from a specific functional area (such as customer service, human resources, or finance), consider BA roles working on the business applications with which you are familiar or supporting this area of the company. Your familiarity with the terminology and processes for that functional area could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have deep experience in a specific industry. consider business analyst roles in that industry. Your understanding of the industry environment, terminology, and core processes could qualify you for specific BA roles.

To sum things up, the answer to the question about whether or not you are qualified to be a business analyst requires a bit of analysis. First, you must discover your business analyst skills. Then you want to map them to the types of roles you see in your local job market. Most likely, you will find yourself to be very qualified for some roles, partially qualified for others, and not at all qualified for still others (and this last set will most likely be the biggest, and that s true even for BAs with formal experience).

With this information in hand, you can decide how and if to move forward in your BA career. And keep in mind, just like those I work with on their career transitions, it s quite possible and actually very likely that you have more relevant experience than you think, and you won t realize what those qualifications are until you go through a skills discovery process .

Find Your Path Into a Business Analyst Career

After reading and working through the exercises in How to Start a Business Analyst Career. you’ll know how to assess and expand your business analysis skills and experience.

This book will help you find your best path forward into a business analyst career. More than that, you will know exactly what to do next to expand your business analysis opportunities.

Click here to learn more about How to Start a Business Analyst Career

Stay informed about new articles and course offerings.




How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor #business #economics

#business advisor

#

How to Find a Qualified Small Business Advisor

Business planning, financial projections, employee management, and customer acquisitions are just a few of the issues that small business owners wrestle with. Startups and fast-growing companies have even more challenges — and that’s where a business advisor is most valuable. Whether they’re helping with starting a new business or managing an existing enterprise, small business advisors are seasoned professionals that help with strategic business planning and crucial operational decisions.

Alas, great small business advisors, like great football coaches, are rare. Here are some tips to finding the perfect small business coach, so you can score a few more touchdowns and experience a lot fewer fumbles:

1) Look for an advisor who’s managed a small business – Small businesses are a different animal than large corporations. Find a business coach that understands the special challenges of small business, including recruiting and retaining employees, capital funding, product marketing, and keeping up with technology. Additionally, target an advisor who had success with your biggest business challenge. For instance, if your main roadblock is distribution, target an advisor who is a distribution channels expert.

2) Look for an advisor with credentials – A business advisor doesn’t necessarily need credentials, a special license, or a degree to give his opinion on how you should run your business, but it doesn’t hurt. Because anyone can set up shop as an advisor, look for someone with a business degree, MBA, or other coaching credentials such as CPCP (Certified Professional Coach Program), ACC (Associate Certified Coach), PCC (Professional Certified Coach), or MCC (Master Certified Coach) for added peace of mind that you’re getting good advice.

3) Choose an advisor who focuses on your niche – An advisor that specializes in your industry will speak your language, understand your business concerns, and know the competitive umbrella your business operates under. If you’re lucky, he’ll have some great industry contacts too.

4) Find an advisor through SCORE – SCORE Counselors to America’s Small Business is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to educate entrepreneurially-minded individuals nationwide in the creation, growth, and success of small businesses. With over 11,200 volunteers nationwide, SCORE offers free help with small business planning and other advice. Find a SCORE advisor through the website’s handy search function or visit your local SCORE office.

5) Check out the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches (WABC) – Founded in 1997, the WABC is an international association aimed at the leadership and development of worldwide business coaching. The WABC requires rigorous membership requirements based upon coaching experience, references, and business expertise. With over 1,000 business coaches spanning 30 countries, the WABC is a great advisory resource.

6) Search BusinessAdviser – BusinessAdviser.com is an independent consultancy international businesses directory. Search by location, firm or specialty.

7) Ask for referrals – Last but not least, ask your mentors, work associates, and members of social networks who they have used and would recommend in a business advisor capacity.

Liked this article? We think you will enjoy these recommendations.





How Do I Know If I – m Qualified to Be a

#business analyst

#

How Do I Know If I m Qualified to Be a Business Analyst?

Are you exploring a career in as a business analyst? Do you find yourself wondering if your skills and experience are relevant to a business analyst role? Would you be interested in learning about how qualified you are to be a business analyst?

We re going to talk about how to know if you are qualified to be a business analyst, but first I m going to share a funny story with you.

(Before I forget, I want to be sure you know about my step-by-step BA career planning course (it’s free) that’s designed to help you, the mid-career professional, kick-start your business analysis career. The course will help you dig deeper into each of the concepts outlined below.)

Just last week, the night before my birthday, I walked down the short flight of stairs after putting our daughter to bed. I smiled at my husband. He was making an odd expression. I continued to look more deeply at him to figure out why.

I walked over to where he was sitting and said, What s that goofy face for?

He says, You didn t see it, did you?

Me: See what?

He shifts his eyes back toward the stairs. On the ledge we have right in front of our stairway were a dozen yellow roses laying out in plain sight.

I couldn t believe I had completely missed them. For a split second, I even starting thinking that just maybe my husband tele-ported them there, but then I remembered the laws of physics and found my own eyes to be the culprit.

I was looking at my husband and his funny expression instead of what was right in front of me.

This same sort of thing happens to all of us, all of the time. We often don t see what can be obvious to other people or even what other people expect we should obviously be seeing. In all the work I do with professionals transitioning into the BA profession, the most prevalent problem I see is that they overlook significant relevant and transferable skills from their own career background.

As a result, their answer to the question, Am I qualified to be a business analyst? is a resounding no when it should be a yes or at least a some of the time . (And as we ll see in a bit, some of the time can be a very effective path to business analysis.)

Today, I d like to help you see the bouquet of roses waiting for you on the ledge at the bottom of the stairs. And to do that we need to look at the concept of transferable skills.

What are Transferable Business Analyst Skills?

Transferable skills are skills that you’ve built through experiences in your past roles. In the context of business analysis, transferable skills are BA techniques you’ve used in non-BA jobs or soft skills you’ve developed in perhaps unrelated roles.

Transferable skills can help you skip past entry-level business analyst positions. This is especially important because there tend to be very few entry-level business analyst positions. And those savored few entry-level positions tend to favor recent college graduates without the salary requirements of an experienced professional.

If you do have even a few years of professional experience, and a fair amount of the 42 reasons to become a business analyst resonate with you, then you have transferable skills. Getting clear and confident about them is part of your path to success as a business analyst and figuring out what roles you qualify for.

But What Business Analyst Qualifications Are Transferable?

When transitioning to business analysis, there are many areas in which to look for your business analyst qualifications. A good first step is to review our list of core business analysis skills that are important for a new business analyst and start mapping your experience to these skill areas.

Here s a rundown of what you can expect to find during this process:

  • The core business analyst skills. those you might find mapped out in the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge® (BABOK®). will help you get past the screening process for a business analyst role. Any given hiring manager tends to have a checklist of key qualifications they absolutely want to have met by a potential candidate. And even if your experience is informal. it s likely that you can map it to a more formal deliverable or analysis technique. Use the BA terms (appropriately) in your resume and in a job interview and you ll increase your chances of qualifying yourself for a business analyst role.
  • Although managers screen for a specific set of core business analyst skills, they often hire for soft skills. such as relationship-building and the ability to communicate with a diverse set of stakeholders from the business and technical communities. Understanding the key soft skills you bring to the table is critical. Being able to speak to specific experiences where you used those soft skills in a BA context (or close to BA context) can increase the number of BA jobs you ll qualify for.
  • Then there will be skills that set you apart as a candidate and qualify you for specific types of BA positions. These vary widely from technical skills, to specific business domain knowledge, to experience with specific types of business applications.

What Do I Do with My List of Business Analyst Qualifications?

Even with a list of transferable business analyst qualifications in hand, a transitioning BA can get understandably frustrated. What business analyst roles do these skills qualify you for? It can often seem as if the grass is greener on the other side of the proverbial fence .

  • If you don t have an IT background, it can seem as if every possible BA job you look at requires some obscure technical skill you have no interest in building.
  • If you do have an IT background, but no business experience, it can see as if every possible BA job you look at requires business domain experience.

While you will most likely find that the number of roles you aren t qualified for outweigh the number of roles you do qualify for, your career background will qualify you very strongly for a specific set business analyst jobs .

  • If you have a technical background. consider BA roles that include systems analysis responsibilities or blend selected IT duties with a business analyst role. Your experience with specific technologies could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have a business background from a specific functional area (such as customer service, human resources, or finance), consider BA roles working on the business applications with which you are familiar or supporting this area of the company. Your familiarity with the terminology and processes for that functional area could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have deep experience in a specific industry. consider business analyst roles in that industry. Your understanding of the industry environment, terminology, and core processes could qualify you for specific BA roles.

To sum things up, the answer to the question about whether or not you are qualified to be a business analyst requires a bit of analysis. First, you must discover your business analyst skills. Then you want to map them to the types of roles you see in your local job market. Most likely, you will find yourself to be very qualified for some roles, partially qualified for others, and not at all qualified for still others (and this last set will most likely be the biggest, and that s true even for BAs with formal experience).

With this information in hand, you can decide how and if to move forward in your BA career. And keep in mind, just like those I work with on their career transitions, it s quite possible and actually very likely that you have more relevant experience than you think, and you won t realize what those qualifications are until you go through a skills discovery process .

Find Your Path Into a Business Analyst Career

After reading and working through the exercises in How to Start a Business Analyst Career. you’ll know how to assess and expand your business analysis skills and experience.

This book will help you find your best path forward into a business analyst career. More than that, you will know exactly what to do next to expand your business analysis opportunities.

Click here to learn more about How to Start a Business Analyst Career

Stay informed about new articles and course offerings.