Bump stocks are selling briskly since Vegas attack, some sellers say –

Bump stocks are selling briskly since Vegas attack, some sellers say

Selling business

Some gun sellers say customers are rushing to buy bump stocks — the accessories that make rifles fire like automatic weapons — since the massacre in Las Vegas.

“Oh, God, yes, it’s been insane. Since this story has broke, we’ve been getting about 50 people a day asking for them,” said Michael Cargill, owner of Central Texas Gun Works in Austin, Texas. He said his distributors sold out, too.

Gun sellers told CNNMoney they believe the sales spike is driven by fears of tighter gun control — perhaps including a ban on bump stocks — since the attack in Las Vegas, the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history.

Twelve bump stocks were found on firearms recovered at the Mandalay Bay hotel room of Stephen Paddock, the gunman, who killed 58 people in the assault Sunday night. In police body camera footage of the massacre, the sound of the gunfire resembles that of a fully automatic weapon.

Legislators of both parties have suggested bump stocks should be controlled more tightly or banned altogether. The National Rifle Association said Thursday that bump stocks should be subject to “additional regulations,” and the White House signaled President Trump was open to discussing a ban.

There are no available nationwide figures on sales of bump stocks since the massacre. But sellers at stores in several states told CNNMoney that sales had taken off.

“Now that someone has come out saying maybe we should ban them, they’re definitely going to sell off the shelf,” Cargill said.

John Reid, owner of J.T. Reid’s Gun Shop in Auburn, Maine, said “everybody’s been wiped out” of bump stocks since the shooting. He said he had five on his shelf that were “sitting there collecting dust” for months and he sold four of them on Wednesday.

“All the distributors are out because customers bought them all,” said Josh Dagnese, the owner of Village Gun Store in Whitefield, New Hampshire. “I am unable to reorder because of the demand.” He said that he sold his last five bump stocks on Tuesday and hasn’t been able to restock.

Slide Fire, a company that has sold bump stocks since 2013, announced on its website that it has stopped supplying the devices, as least for now.

“We have decided to temporarily suspend taking new orders in order to provide the best service with those already placed,” said the company, based from Moline, Texas. Company officials did not return calls or emails from CNNMoney.

Another bump fire company, FosTech Outdoors of Seymour, Indiana, did not return messages, nor did Walmart ( WMT ) or Cabela’s, which both sell guns. Online retailers Gunbroker.com and CheaperThanDirt were also not available. The gun industry group, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, declined to comment.

Selling businessBump fire stocks, like the Slide Fire one at the top of this picture, are attached to semi-automatic rifles to speed up the rate of fire.

Bump stocks are attached to semiautomatic rifles like AR-15s and AK-47s to speed up the rate of fire, leveraging the gun’s own recoil to allow a person to fire faster than manual trigger-pulling. The accessories are legal. They retail for several hundred dollars.

Brice Jager, owner of Iowa Gun in Walnut, Iowa, said that although bump stocks do not require background checks, he conducts his own. He said he rejects customers who smell like alcohol or marijuana or “if they look a little unstable.”

He said that he’s rejected about a dozen would-be bump fire buyers since the shooting in Las Vegas, but he also sold two during his phone conversation with CNNMoney.

Some gun retailers frown on bump stocks because they make guns prone to jamming, inaccurate and difficult to control.

“I will order them if someone wants one, but I highly discourage them from purchasing,” said Will Dance, a retailer with Red Hills Arms in Tallahassee, Florida. “It’s not safe, they don’t work, and it’s a gimmick.”

Julie Gipson, co-owner of Chestatee Firearms in Dahlonega, Georgia, says she sells full automatic guns for tens of thousands of dollars, but she doesn’t sell bump stocks, which she described as “a pain in the butt to work with. If you really want to get a full automatic, pony up and get a real one.”

–CNNMoney’s Danielle Wiener-Bronner contributed to this report.





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Bump stocks are selling briskly since Vegas attack, some sellers say –

Bump stocks are selling briskly since Vegas attack, some sellers say

Selling business

Some gun sellers say customers are rushing to buy bump stocks — the accessories that make rifles fire like automatic weapons — since the massacre in Las Vegas.

“Oh, God, yes, it’s been insane. Since this story has broke, we’ve been getting about 50 people a day asking for them,” said Michael Cargill, owner of Central Texas Gun Works in Austin, Texas. He said his distributors sold out, too.

Gun sellers told CNNMoney they believe the sales spike is driven by fears of tighter gun control — perhaps including a ban on bump stocks — since the attack in Las Vegas, the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history.

Twelve bump stocks were found on firearms recovered at the Mandalay Bay hotel room of Stephen Paddock, the gunman, who killed 58 people in the assault Sunday night. In police body camera footage of the massacre, the sound of the gunfire resembles that of a fully automatic weapon.

Legislators of both parties have suggested bump stocks should be controlled more tightly or banned altogether. The National Rifle Association said Thursday that bump stocks should be subject to “additional regulations,” and the White House signaled President Trump was open to discussing a ban.

There are no available nationwide figures on sales of bump stocks since the massacre. But sellers at stores in several states told CNNMoney that sales had taken off.

“Now that someone has come out saying maybe we should ban them, they’re definitely going to sell off the shelf,” Cargill said.

John Reid, owner of J.T. Reid’s Gun Shop in Auburn, Maine, said “everybody’s been wiped out” of bump stocks since the shooting. He said he had five on his shelf that were “sitting there collecting dust” for months and he sold four of them on Wednesday.

“All the distributors are out because customers bought them all,” said Josh Dagnese, the owner of Village Gun Store in Whitefield, New Hampshire. “I am unable to reorder because of the demand.” He said that he sold his last five bump stocks on Tuesday and hasn’t been able to restock.

Slide Fire, a company that has sold bump stocks since 2013, announced on its website that it has stopped supplying the devices, as least for now.

“We have decided to temporarily suspend taking new orders in order to provide the best service with those already placed,” said the company, based from Moline, Texas. Company officials did not return calls or emails from CNNMoney.

Another bump fire company, FosTech Outdoors of Seymour, Indiana, did not return messages, nor did Walmart ( WMT ) or Cabela’s, which both sell guns. Online retailers Gunbroker.com and CheaperThanDirt were also not available. The gun industry group, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, declined to comment.

Selling businessBump fire stocks, like the Slide Fire one at the top of this picture, are attached to semi-automatic rifles to speed up the rate of fire.

Bump stocks are attached to semiautomatic rifles like AR-15s and AK-47s to speed up the rate of fire, leveraging the gun’s own recoil to allow a person to fire faster than manual trigger-pulling. The accessories are legal. They retail for several hundred dollars.

Brice Jager, owner of Iowa Gun in Walnut, Iowa, said that although bump stocks do not require background checks, he conducts his own. He said he rejects customers who smell like alcohol or marijuana or “if they look a little unstable.”

He said that he’s rejected about a dozen would-be bump fire buyers since the shooting in Las Vegas, but he also sold two during his phone conversation with CNNMoney.

Some gun retailers frown on bump stocks because they make guns prone to jamming, inaccurate and difficult to control.

“I will order them if someone wants one, but I highly discourage them from purchasing,” said Will Dance, a retailer with Red Hills Arms in Tallahassee, Florida. “It’s not safe, they don’t work, and it’s a gimmick.”

Julie Gipson, co-owner of Chestatee Firearms in Dahlonega, Georgia, says she sells full automatic guns for tens of thousands of dollars, but she doesn’t sell bump stocks, which she described as “a pain in the butt to work with. If you really want to get a full automatic, pony up and get a real one.”

–CNNMoney’s Danielle Wiener-Bronner contributed to this report.





Business – definition of business by The Free Dictionary, selling a business.#Selling

business

These nouns apply to forms of activity that have the objective of supplying products or services for a fee. Business pertains broadly to commercial, financial, and industrial activity, and more narrowly to specific fields or firms engaging in this activity: a company that does business over the internet; went into the software consulting business; owns a dry-cleaning business. Industry entails the production and manufacture of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale: the computer industry. Commerce and trade refer to the exchange and distribution of goods or commodities: laws regulating interstate commerce; involved in the domestic fur trade. Traffic pertains in particular to businesses engaged in the transportation of goods or passengers: renovated the docks to attract shipping traffic. The word may also suggest illegal trade: discovered a brisk traffic in stolen goods.

busi ness

Business

  1. As oxygen is the disintegrating principle of life, working night and day to dissolve, separate, pull apart and dissipate, so there is something in business that continually tends to scatter, destroy and shift possession from this man to that. A million mice nibble eternally at every business venture Elbert Hubbard
  2. Business is like a man rowing a boat upstream. He has no choice; he must go ahead or he will go back Lewis E. Pierson
  3. Business is like oil. It won t mix with anything but business J. Grahame
  4. Business is very much like religion: it is founded on faith William McFee
  5. Business policy flows downhill from the mountain, like water Anon
  6. A business without customers is like a computer without bytes Anon

As the entries that follow show, this concept lends itself to many additional twists.

Playwrights Ernst and Lindley wrote this simile to be spoken by a judge in their 1930 s play Hold Your Tongue.

The first two words are transposed from Computer companies to generalize the comparison.

business

Business is the work of making, buying, and selling goods or services.

When you use business in this sense, don’t say ‘a business’. Don’t say, for example, ‘ We’ve got a business to do ‘. You say ‘We’ve got some business to do’.

You can talk about a particular area of business using the followed by a noun followed by business.

A business is a company, shop, or organization that makes and sells goods or provides a service.





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Comment: War!! Trump! Oh, stop worrying. The End is Nigh (uh-huh, uh-huh) And I Like It

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Call for a change in priorities to avert retirement housing crisis

Our freehold cost £38,000 – now we re being denied compensation

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The best places to retire abroad, from a kibbutz in the Canaries to a senior living village in Thailand

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GE shifts strategy, financial targets for digital business after missteps, Reuters, selling

GE shifts strategy, financial targets for digital business after missteps

NEW YORK (Reuters) – General Electric Co wants its industrial software business to cut costs and lift profits next year under new chief executive John Flannery, and is considering expanded partnerships and the possible sale of some equity in the unit, according to people familiar with the business.

Former chief executive Jeffrey Immelt spent six years and more than $4 billion transforming 125-year-old GE into a digital industrial company. But GE has had technical problems and delays with its software platform, known as Predix, which connects equipment like turbines and elevators to computers that can predict failures and reduce operating costs.

This spring, GE called an unusual, two month time-out to tackle the Predix problems, which have not been previously reported. With fixes in place, GE will now emphasize sales to existing customers in its energy, aviation and oil-and-gas businesses, and scale back efforts to sell to new customers in other sectors, three senior GE executives told Reuters.

Our resources will go to our fastest-selling markets, GE Digital Chief Executive Officer Bill Ruh said in an interview.

To help investors better understand Predix, GE also has redefined digital revenue to exclude $3 billion in hardware related to its gas-fueled power plants, providing a clearer picture of the pure software business and avoiding double-counting, Chief Financial Officer Jeff Bornstein said.

The company now expects $12 billion in digital revenue in 2020, compared with $15 billion under the old definition. GE s total revenue hit nearly $124 billion last year.

The changes mark an important course correction for GE Digital, which so far has not delivered the revenue investors wanted and is partly responsible for a 25 percent decline in GE s share price this year to a near two-year low.

GE estimates the industrial internet market will be worth $225 billion a year by 2020, and Flannery, who became CEO on Aug. 1, appears committed to Immelt s vision of being a major player, according to two people familiar with his thinking.

But the 55-year-old leader, known for finance skills and making tough decisions, is likely to press GE Digital to reduce costs and lift profits next year. He also may restructure how GE Digital operates, bring in more partners and possibly sell a minority stake in the unit, they told Reuters.

There was a lot of money spent on Predix, said a former senior financial executive at GE who worked with Flannery. They are going to tighten the grip and ensure there s a return.

GE declined to comment on Flannery s plans.

Immelt was among the first executives to spot the industrial internet wave nearly a decade ago, and positioning the company to catch it became one of his signature strategic moves in his 16 year term as chief executive.

This is an all-encompassing change, Immelt said last year, as GE increased its digital investment.

Analysts and investors see potential for Predix to deliver substantial sales and profits. It already has attracted some large customers, including power utility Exelon Corp and elevator maker Schindler Holding AG, and orders rose 24 percent to $2.3 billion in the first half of 2017.

But some analysts and investors say the business has taken longer than expected to mature, and its current growth rate is too slow to hit GE s $12 billion target by 2020. Spending also soared under Immelt, which weighed on profits.

He gave Bill Ruh an endless checkbook, Nick Heymann, an analyst at William Blair Co., said of Immelt.

Case in point: GE has budgeted $700 million more in digital spending this year – to a total of $2.1 billion – to further develop Predix and its applications, and to boost sales efforts. GE executives noted this is likely to mark the peak for digital investment.

GE Digital Chief Financial Officer Khozema Shipchandler said the 2020 revenue target is within reach since recurring Predix subscriptions pile on significant revenue as time goes on.

FIXING PREDIX

Immelt pushed GE to go digital sooner than other companies. But some early missteps cost time and money as GE s strategy evolved. Engineers initially advised building data centers that would house the Predix Cloud. But after Amazon.com Inc and Microsoft Corp spent tens of billions of dollars on data centers for their cloud services, AWS and Azure, GE changed course.

That is not an investment we can compete with, Ruh said.

GE abandoned its go-it-alone cloud strategy a year ago. It now relies on AWS and expects to be using Azure by late October, four months behind schedule, the executives said.

As GE pivoted away from building data centers, its engineers focused on applications, which executives now saw as more useful for winning business and more profitable than the platform alone.

That is probably the biggest lesson we ve learned, Ruh said.

GE also faced legacy challenges in adapting to Predix software. GE has many algorithms for monitoring its machines, but they mostly were written in different coding languages and reside on other systems in GE businesses. This makes transferring them to Predix more time consuming, people familiar with the system told Reuters.

The acquisition of Meridium and ServiceMax over the past 10 months gave GE well-known applications and added about $150 million to annual digital revenue, GE said. But the new products also brought more code that had to be converted to run on Predix, people familiar with the systems said.

The result: software installation sometimes took much longer than GE anticipated, the code had bugs and applications sometimes lacked features that customers wanted, these people said.

GE executives acknowledged Predix had experienced technical problems and was behind schedule in hitting some goals. During the time out in May and June, GE Digital s programmers made Predix more stable, they said.

The changes in strategy have come with a change in leadership. Predix chief Harel Kodesh and GE Digital Chief Commercial Officer Kate Johnson both left this year. Patrick Franklin, who succeeded Kodesh, called the time out to fix Predix.

Ruh said the leadership evolved with the business and that GE has the right people to keep Predix growing.

RIVALS TAKE AIM

The competition is not standing still. Large rivals such as Siemens AG and a crop of nimble startups are pressing to gain market share in GE s main areas of energy, aviation, locomotives, health care and oil and gas.

Chicago-based startup Uptake signed a deal in March with subsidiaries of Berkshire Hathaway Energy to provide analytics on thousands of wind turbines, including those made by GE. C3 IoT, based in Redwood City, California, won a deal last year with French utility Engie SA, a GE customer. Engie later signed a digital partnership agreement with GE.

Stewart Stevenson, a maker of fracking pumps and other equipment, met with GE about Predix in 2015 but quickly decided against it.

They didn t seem to be able to customize to meet the needs of our customers, said Chris Harvell, the firm s chief technology officer. And if they did do any development, we d probably end up paying quite a bit of money.

The company chose Flutura, a 100-person, Houston firm started in 2012, for a pilot. Flutura lacked GE s scale, but could easily produce custom code, he said.

Ruh said that while GE faces competitors in every deal, many startups are not true competitors because Predix includes unique applications and is available globally.

No other competitor has these capabilities on their platforms, he said.

Inside GE, executives remain bullish. Predix will pay off handsomely if GE stays focused on building it and winning customers, said Joshua Bloom, co-founder and chief technology officer of Wise.io, an artificial intelligence firm GE bought last year.

But, he said, “doing that right and at scale is a massive challenge.

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Business – definition of business by The Free Dictionary, selling business.#Selling #business

business

These nouns apply to forms of activity that have the objective of supplying products or services for a fee. Business pertains broadly to commercial, financial, and industrial activity, and more narrowly to specific fields or firms engaging in this activity: a company that does business over the internet; went into the software consulting business; owns a dry-cleaning business. Industry entails the production and manufacture of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale: the computer industry. Commerce and trade refer to the exchange and distribution of goods or commodities: laws regulating interstate commerce; involved in the domestic fur trade. Traffic pertains in particular to businesses engaged in the transportation of goods or passengers: renovated the docks to attract shipping traffic. The word may also suggest illegal trade: discovered a brisk traffic in stolen goods.

busi ness

Business

  1. As oxygen is the disintegrating principle of life, working night and day to dissolve, separate, pull apart and dissipate, so there is something in business that continually tends to scatter, destroy and shift possession from this man to that. A million mice nibble eternally at every business venture Elbert Hubbard
  2. Business is like a man rowing a boat upstream. He has no choice; he must go ahead or he will go back Lewis E. Pierson
  3. Business is like oil. It won t mix with anything but business J. Grahame
  4. Business is very much like religion: it is founded on faith William McFee
  5. Business policy flows downhill from the mountain, like water Anon
  6. A business without customers is like a computer without bytes Anon

As the entries that follow show, this concept lends itself to many additional twists.

Playwrights Ernst and Lindley wrote this simile to be spoken by a judge in their 1930 s play Hold Your Tongue.

The first two words are transposed from Computer companies to generalize the comparison.

business

Business is the work of making, buying, and selling goods or services.

When you use business in this sense, don’t say ‘a business’. Don’t say, for example, ‘ We’ve got a business to do ‘. You say ‘We’ve got some business to do’.

You can talk about a particular area of business using the followed by a noun followed by business.

A business is a company, shop, or organization that makes and sells goods or provides a service.





Business: News, comments – analysis, selling a business.#Selling #a #business

Business

Amazon delivery scandal Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Petrofac beefs up defences amid threat of takeover

Selling a business

Selling a business

Comment: Rolet s departure from the London Stock Exchange is going to end badly

Selling a business

Follow Telegraph Business

Be bold but don’t be naive about the money drying up

The sweet smell of success: how a small business grew into a high-end brand

Business Desk

EU closes in on Google as it prepares second antitrust fine

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Fox control of sky is bad news for UK, warns Neil

Old media braced for showdown with tech giants in the battle for scale

Have the lights gone out on the Big Six?

Emirates set to throw Airbus s A380 a lifeline with major order

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Selling a business

The power struggle behind the Saudi night of the long knives

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

For unlimited access to expert opinion and unrivalled insight from The Telegraph, join Premium today. Free for 30 days.

Economy

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

EU predicts eurozone boom but UK gloom in pessimistic forecasts

Markets

Market report: Burberry fall softened by activist investor upping stake

Industrial production smashes expectations but construction sector slips deep into recession

Market report: Takeover talk lifts Tesla supplier Telit Communcations

In charts: the FTSE keeps rising – can it last?

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Market report: OneSavings Bank benefits from dinner party landlord clampdown

Marks Spencer shares yo-yo as CFO quits and food expansion slows

Small Business Connect

Culture, staff and brand are key for scaling firms

There’s no such thing as being too small to export

Web chat: Small businesses and online learning

Should your business open a second location?

Opinion

Comment: To Netflix the spoils as the old guard is eclipsed

Selling a business

Comment: Bear as I am, the case is there for this bull market to charge on

Selling a business

Comment: The economy is growing faster than we think

Selling a business

Banks and Finance

David Davis says City is very much in my mind as Brexit talks resume

Top LSE investor ramps up revolt to oust chairman and keep CEO

Janus Henderson raises savings target after trimming workforce

Media and Telecoms

Vodafone backs ultrafast broadband for five million in threat to BT

21st Century Fox gets revenue boost from higher advertising sales

AT T told to sell CNN by US regulators

Retail and Consumer

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Selling a business

Watch John Lewis s Christmas advert with Moz the monster under the bed

Energy

Have the lights gone out on the Big Six?

National Grid pours investment into US as UK political threat looms

UK hands world s largest oil company Saudi Aramco $2bn loan to secure IPO

Transport

EasyJet hires new chief from rival Tui weeks ahead of McCall s exit

Flybe slims down fleet in effort to address overcapacity

Heathrow chairman hopes expansion scheme s regional hubs could mark a step-change for construction industry

Construction

New Zealand looks to woo thousands of British brickies in lead-up to Brexit

Construction sector returns to growth, but optimism is in short supply

Morgan Sindall bucks construction slowdown to increase forecasts

Utilities

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

DCC enters US fuel market with £152m acquisition

G4S downgrades revenue forecast amid slow trading in the Middle East and India

Questor

Questor: Compass sticks to the recipe for succession and serves up steady growth

Questor: National Grid is in politically choppy waters, but its index-linked income is precious

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Questor: there’s plenty of scope for this aviation firm’s undervalued shares to soar

Money

Latest bank transfer fraud victims: We ve lost £113,665 and are now homeless with eight pets

How the Government s inflation trick makes pensioners, commuters and students poorer

Biotech stocks are up 560pc in a decade – and this is how to play the sector for more

BT, Virgin and the biggest broadband firms to provide automatic compensation for poor service

Sponsored

Selling a business

The best place to start a business – four alternatives to London

Selling a business

Is your business really as secure as you think?

Selling a business

How can on-site generation help energy users profit from efficiency?

Selling a business

Follow Telegraph Business

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Selling a business

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Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Selling Your Business #business #software

#selling a business

#

If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .





Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

Kaeser & Blair business owners
discuss how to make extra money.

Kaeser & Blair is different. K
/* 728×90, создано 05.02.11 */
google_ad_slot = “6127977750”;
google_ad_width = 670;
google_ad_height = 90;
//–>

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #startup #business #loans

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

Loading the player.

Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

Kaeser & Blair business owners
discuss how to make extra money.

Kaeser & Blair is different. K
/* 728×90, создано 05.02.11 */
google_ad_slot = “6127977750”;
google_ad_width = 670;
google_ad_height = 90;
//–>

Selling Your Business #online #business

#selling a business

#

If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .





7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #business #startup #loan

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

Loading the player.

Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #business #card #holder

#sell my business

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10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?





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Even small fires can create significant amounts of soot and odor, leaving the home or office essentially uninhabitable. Resolution Fire + Flood’s processes allow you to get back to normal, FAST. We offer the following services: • Soot removal • Cleaning of the structure, both inside and out • Deodorization services • Contents restoration • Pack out services Learn about our other services.

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The Small Business Owner s Guide to Choosing the Right Ecommerce Platform


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The Small Business Owner’s Guide to Choosing the Right Ecommerce Platform

CEO of The Media Captain

Wendy and Walter, a recently married couple from Wyoming, are enjoying home roasted coffee on a Saturday morning.

Wendy gets a notification on her phone and is overcome with joy. A welder from Wisconsin saw one of her paintings on Instagram and sent her a direct message wanting to know if the painting she posted is for sale. The welder informed Wendy that he is willing to purchase the painting for $3,800, on the spot.

When Wendy tells Walter, her husband, about the welder in Wisconsin who is interested in her painting, he hugs her excitedly.

Walter is a business-minded individual while Wendy is more artistic. Walter s brain starts racing a million miles per hour. He says to Wendy, We should take the money we make off the welder and invest in an ecommerce store for your beautiful artwork.

Wendy agrees with Walter as they both do the quick math and realize that if they sell 100 painting per year, they could bring in $380,000!

The thought for Wendy of quitting her day job and doing artwork full time gets her adrenaline racing.

And so the entrepreneurial journey begins. The next question that comes up for Wendy and Walter, and any entrepreneur looking to start an ecommerce store is how to get take the first step. How in the world do you go about building an ecommerce site?

Choose wisely.

The majority of entrepreneurs have a certain skill-set, but when it comes to building a website they don t know where to begin.

Choosing the right ecommerce platform is one of the most important business decisions you can make. According to BigCommerce. 96 percent of Americans have made an online purchase in their life, 80 percent in the past month alone. This shows that the future of retail is ecommerce.

Should Wendy and Walter go with Shopify, WooCommerce, Magento or BigCommerce? Should they try to build the site themselves, go with a friend who has a little experience in this area or seek a web development company?

These are my recommendations.

If you re looking to get an e-commerce site off the ground yourself with minimal technical capabilities, I recommend Shopify for the theme store, plugins and built-in tutorials. Shopify is all-inclusive when it comes to an ecommerce platform, meaning you can get all you want in a one-stop shop.

If you have some technical capabilities and want to expand on the out-of-the-box offerings that Shopify offers, then I recommend going with WooCommerce. As an ecommerce platform, WooCommerce is more robust and has many more plugins at your disposal. Keep in mind that WooCommerce can be more challenging when it comes to customizing and coding requirements.

If you need to build an ecommerce site that is completely customized, I recommend a platform like nopCommerce. which is trusted by more than 27,000 store owners. If your business needs something extremely customized, a platform like Shopify or BigCommerce makes it difficult to complete these customizations. NopCommerce is a great option for those .NET developers.

My agency has helped guide countless entrepreneurs on their ecommerce journey. Here are some of the steps you need to take to get started on yours:

1. Start with a theme.

Your theme helps to reflect your identity throughout your site. Themes control your website s style, look and feel. Rather than paying a developer a lot of money to customize your entire site, you can simply choose a theme and have them add your products and images within the theme you choose.

Think of it like moving into a home. While you certainly don t have to build the home from scratch, there still is a lot of work involved to move all of your furniture into the home, decorate it, and make it livable. Each major platform will have a variety of different themes to choose from. Some are free and some can range close to $200 in cost. It all depends on your preference.

2. Choose a platform.

Shopify
If you are looking for a simple e-commerce website that won t require much housekeeping, but still has a classy design and great customer service, go with Shopify. According to e-commerce-platforms.com. Shopify is the most popular ecommerce platform. Shopify offers 20 templates that are free and about 120 more that you can pay for.

An upside to Shopify is that everything is hosted and supported by Shopify, so if you have any issues, there s one point-of-contact and no reaching out to another host or development company.

One of the downsides is that if you go with a free template, you could run into other online stores that look very similar to yours in terms of the overall look and feel. The paid versions of Shopify can help differentiate your online store a little better than the free versions. Another downside to Shopify is that you are redirected away from your domain name during the checkout process. Shopify also doesn t allow you to customize the checkout page — you are bound to what Shopify gives you, minus the logo and customized CSS changes. This could be a big disadvantage for many e-commerce store owners.

Even if you don t have development skills, you can finagle your way around Shopify to get your site up and running. Shopify s 24/7 support can also handle some of the technical details for you, but there will be a fee involved. There are ample plugins for Shopify, such as adding a color swatch if your product comes in multiple colors or a plug-in to integrate your storefront and ecommerce store with Square.

If you are looking for a hands-off approach where you can just sign up and have an ecommerce store launched in no time, Shopify is your best bet. Just be cautious if your store gets bigger and more customization is involved because you could be limited.

WooCommerce
WooCommerce is an open source e-commerce plugin for WordPress. The key takeaways from the prior sentence are WordPress, open source and plug-ins.

If there is something that you need to add onto your site that is more complex and requires customization, WooCommerce is going to be a better route. Open source means you can modify your store freely and there are no limitations. A closed platform, which is what Shopify is, means you can only modify your store to the extent that Shopify allows.As your business grows, often times, you need new features added onto your ecommerce website, and WooCommerce gives you this flexibility.

Let s say your ecommerce business heavily relies on key calendar dates for delivery, like Christmas and Valentine s Day. WooCommerce has a plugin that will allow you to add a calendar on the shipping page and select a specific date you want the package delivered. You may be limited with Shopify if you eventually want this feature added.

WooCommerce also offers thousands of different store designs through WordPress themes. You are less likely to run into the same exact design if you take the WooCommerce route. Many business owners are familiar with WordPress, which makes a seamless transition over to WooCommerce.

With WooCommerce, you also own and have complete control of your own data. Shopify controls your data since you are redirected away from your domain during the checkout process.

Ready, set, launch.

My development agency has worked with the majority of ecommerce platforms. The reason we recommended Shopify and WooCommerce is because both fit a certain need depending on your business type and what your wants and needs are. As I mentioned earlier, if your ecommerce site needs to be completely customized, we recommend a platform like nopCommerce.

I recommend that before building an ecommerce site for your business, create a Word Document to give to your developer listing all of the wants and needs you have for your business. Share this Entrepreneur article with him or her to see what route they recommend. The biggest mistake we see is that business owners rush to tell a developer they want an ecommerce site built without listing out all of the requirements involved. This will cost you time and money in the long run. Also, make sure the developer has plenty of experience with ecommerce sites. This will make your development process more seamless.

3 Reasons Why Your Blog Sucks


NH Real Estate Appraiser – Jack Lavoie, SRA – Accurate Appraisal Services


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Residential – Commercial – Consulting – Expert Witness

Professional, high quality, appraisal and valuation services for lenders, attorneys, homeowners, broker, corporations and more.

Jack Lavoie SRA. a designated member of the Appraisal Institute is one of the most respected and knowledgeable real estate and appraisal professionals in the Greater Manchester Bedford area, as well as throughout New Hampshire.

Jack’s unmatched experience, education and licensing level (holds a Certified General Appraiser license which is the highest level of licensing available) makes him uniquely qualified to provide you with the services you desire and need. With years of experience behind him and extensive high level training, he is prepared to handle a variety of property types and situations. Complex assignments are his specialty and Jack is the area’s 1st choice for taking on these difficult assingments.

In addition to experience and qualifactions, his service and communication with clients is top-notch. Whether it is an appraisal for divorce, bankruptcy, estate settlement, relocation, or an appraisal in conjunction with selling your home, Jack and his staff will treat it as THE most important appraisal ever. Because it is!.

Click link above

We provide professional appraisal reports, consulting and testimony for:

  • Bankruptcy Appraisals
  • Private Mortgage Insurance Removal
  • Estate Planning
  • Divorce Settlement
  • Tax Assessment Disputes
  • Guardianship appraisals
  • Foreclosure/Pre-Foreclosure
  • Buyers/Pre-Purchase
  • Expert Witness/Litigation
  • Cell Tower/Power Line Impact
  • Tax Abatements
  • Retrospective Valuations
  • Employee Relocation (ERC)
  • Estate Settlement
  • REO Valuations
  • Litigation
  • FHA 203K
  • Abutter impact
  • Sellers/Pre-Listing
  • Commerial/Investment

Attn Mobile User: The “Order an appraisal”, “Services” and “Ask Jack” links below are not currently working. Our web provider is actively working on this. To order an appraisal click the blue Order an Appraisal button above.

Our Commitment to You

As I have discussed earler, real estate values are not linear. Each year in New Hampshire, prices change and follow a predictable path like the graph illustrates. Prices rise in the spring, level off in the summer and early fall and decline in the late fall and winter. Check out “North End” Manchester as of […]. Read More

Even in years where the market seems stable, property values fluctuate over the course of the year. Historically, values increase in the spring and early summer, stabilize in summer and early fall and decrease over the winter season. This is attributed to several factors such as the “holiday season” and the harsh cold winters we […]. Read More

Tax abatements, Obtaining a Divorce Appraisal, “Does recessed lighting add value” and should I wait until spring to sell”? Home seller: Should I wait until spring to sell my house” (note: this person is located in Greater Manchester, NH) Jack: If your house is prepared to sell (cleaned, repaired. Read More

Try this short quiz to see which 2016 Presidential candidate you side with… http://www.isidewith.com/elections/2016-presidential-quiz?from=ThmUutAnS Jack Lavoie, SRA Designated member Appraisal Institute Accurate Appraisal Services a division of Jack Lavoie Real Estate, LLC 62 Quincy Drive Bedford, NH 03110 Office: (603) 644-1000 http://www.j. Read More


OHosti – Best Free Unlimited Hosting cPanel – Powerful Unlimited Free Reseller


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We’ve been providing leading free cPanel hosting services with No Ads. All this is made possible by our Paid Dedicated Servers services, including upgrades for those who need more room for growth, as well as donations from our community of users.

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OHosti – Best Free Unlimited Hosting cPanel – Powerful Unlimited Free Reseller


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Free Unlimited Hosting cPanel

Free Unlimited WHM Reseller Hosting

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Free VPS Hosting (90 Days)!

OHosti Powerful Features!

Free Unlimited Web Hosting Features :

Flexible, Easy to Use Control Panel . Unlimited Bandwidth. Unlimited Sub Domains, FTP Accounts, and Email Accounts. 99.9% Uptime Guarantee Build your website using the latest languages including PHP, Ruby, PERL, Python, PostgreSQL, MySQL and more. We also provide SSH access on all Business Hosting plans and have enabled WP-CLI for easy WordPress management.

Why is Our Free VPS Hosting different than Shared and Dedicated?

With our OHosti VPS, you get an entire server. This is optimal for people that have very high traffic to their websites or need to setup their server in a very specific way. Not everyone needs to have a fully dedicated web server however. If you’re just getting started with your website, you can save quite a bit of money if you get a free small portion of the server. Shared hosting is when you share a portion of the server with other users rather than rent an entire server to yourself. If you are considering a dedicated server and are unsure if it is right for you, perhaps you will need to get Free VPS Hosting.

What is our free reseller hosting included?

Everything you need to get started is included in our Reseller packages for a single, no price (free) :

Free cPanel:
Unlike other hosting companies, we never charge you or your clients a fee to manage the content and setup of their websites. cPanel makes that easy.

Free Domains Resales:
Not only can you sell web hosting, our Reseller Program also gives you the ability to sell domain names.

IMAP, POP, SMTP Email:
We offer a variety of email protocols, meaning your clients can check emails anywhere, on any device, easily.

Free Backups and Installers:
We include the Softaculous auto-installer totally Free, so you and your clients can set up websites at the click of a button, and we back your sites up every 24-36 hours, automatically.

Frequently Asked Questions?

Why is it all free on OHosti? How do you earn?

We’ve been providing leading free cPanel hosting services with No Ads. All this is made possible by our Paid Dedicated Servers services, including upgrades for those who need more room for growth, as well as donations from our community of users.

How long will your hosting be free?

Forever! We have provided Paid Servers services since 2010 and we have been in free hosting business since 2009.

What are your guarantees?

1. Our hosting will always be 100% free!

2. We own all our servers and locate them in high quality data centers, so no one can shut down or reload any server with your data.

3. We utilise dedicated connections to ensure we can provide enough bandwidth for all our users.

Free Domain Name Privacy

Did you know that whenever a domain name is registered, The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) requires your personal information be published in the WHOIS database? This includes your mailing address, phone number and email address!

With Domain Privacy Protection from OHosti Hosting we will make our information available to the public instead of yours. This can help protect you from potential spammers, telemarketers and even identity thieves. This wouldn’t cost you any thing only $0.00 annually! (Fully Free). Otherwise we would have to use the information we currently have on file for your account.

Your name will remain as the registrant contact so that you retain complete ownership of the domain.

You can register a free .com. net. org. tk. ml. ga. cf. gq (including Special Domains).

Domain Privacy Protection is available with all hosting accounts, including shared hosting, vps hosting, and our dedicated servers.

Create New Website?

Build your website in 4 easy steps:

  • 01 Login to Site Builder
  • 02 Select Web Template
  • 03 Publish to your hosting account
  • 04 Select web template search etc.

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress

#letterpress business cards

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Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #business #first

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

Loading the player.

Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #business #consulting

#sell my business

#

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?





MLM News – Direct Selling Facts, Figures and News #register #your #business

#best home business

#

The average Top Earner in Direct Selling is earning approxiately $20,000 per month / $240,000 per year based on 8,000+ ranks and 500+ distributors are making $1+ million a year.

Below distributor earnings are based on our Confidential Top Earner Form . public sources, conventions, up and downline information and are estimated due to the dynamics in pay plans.

Business For Home collects top earners data since year 2007 and we publish on a daily basis important Direct Selling News .

Active distributors are using this website to introduce prospects into the world of Direct Selling and to show what is possible.

The ranks are updating every 30 minutes in real time. Below are the first 1,000 top earners,

If you want access to all 8,000 top earners please log a support ticket .

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

Search This Website (Fast)





7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #business #plan #model

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

Loading the player.

Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #free #business #listings

#sell my business

#

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?





Selling Your Business #start #up #business #ideas

#selling a business

#

If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .





Best Direct Selling Companies – Direct Selling Business for Women #register #business

#home party businesses

#

9 Best Direct Selling Companies

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

If you’d like to make some extra money by being a hostess extraordinaire, starting your own direct selling business can be a fun way to do it. Working for a direct selling company allows you to create a flexible schedule by hosting parties, shows or workshops, and take home a percentage of your sales or a percentage of the sales of people you sign up to be representatives. Keep in mind that to make a lot of money, you need to sell a lot, but if you’re looking to supplement a steady income, direct selling could be just what you’re looking for. And if it turns out direct selling isn’t for you, most companies including the nine listed here offer reimbursement or exchange programs to buy back unused materials at full price or part of the full price, depending on how long you have had the products. Read on to discover nine companies that might be worth your while.

The Pampered Chef
If you have a passion for cooking and kitchen essentials, The Pampered Chef helps you make money by hosting “cooking shows” where your guests can buy an array of kitchen products sold by the company. There are two available starter kits: the New Consultant Kit ($155), which includes 25 products as well as training, marketing and business materials; and the New Consultant Mini Kit ($80), which includes a smaller selection of products, in addition to training, marketing and business materials. As a consultant, you can earn 20 to 25 percent of your total sales for each “show,” and, by recruiting a team of consultants, you can earn an additional 1 percent of your sales and 1 percent of their total sales. Also, once a consultant has reached $15,000 in sales in their career, their commission rate is automatically increased by 2 percent on all levels.

Silpada Designs
Silpada Designs offers sterling silver jewelry, belts and watches that you sell as a hostess of an at-home “jewelry party.” The starter kit ($199) includes personalized business cards, a representative ID stamp, 50 Silpada Designs catalogs, a polishing cloth, a ring- and belt-sizer, and one of three jewelry packages to choose from. Each package includes three pieces of jewelry to display at your parties (a necklace, bracelet and earrings). In addition, hostesses receive a 50 percent discount off any jewelry you choose to buy for yourself, to wear or display. The kit includes information on how to become a successful representative, training CDs, monthly newsletters, a personalized MySilpada website, a home-show DVD and unlimited one-on-one training from a Silpada sales coach. Consultants earn 30 percent commission on every piece of jewelry sold, and if you recruit other consultants, you earn anywhere between 4 and 16 percent of their sales, based on your team’s total sales. As a bonus, during the first 100 days, consultants can earn up to $3,000 in free jewelry based on sales and recruiting activity.

Heritage Makers
Through Heritage Makers. hosts hold “home workshops” or “virtual workshops,” selling professionally bound cards, canvases, storybooks, posters, digital scrapbooks and photo gifts. Hosts can also schedule “Studio Demos,” in which clients are taught how to use the Heritage online software and can buy memberships to Club HM, the company’s publishing club, which consultants are encouraged to join. Club HM has three levels of monthly membership: $30, $50 and $100. As a member of the club, hosts receive free “publishing points,” which can be used to buy Heritage Makers products, with each point equaling $1. The $30 membership equals 40 points, $50 is 70 points and $100 is 120 points. You are also allowed to purchase “publishing points” at a wholesale discount of up to 34 percent off. The Consultant Signup Kit ($50) includes a starting guide, card sampler, order forms, brochures, catalogs, training DVD, personal website and virtual office, and an 8 x 8 storybook sample. Hosts can also sign up for an add-on Business Builder Kit for an additional $100, which includes additional workshop materials and supplies. Consultants make 10 to 30 percent of their total sales, 20 to 30 percent of the sales of those you’ve recruited and 1 to 5 percent of sales of the representatives recruited by your team, depending on individual and team sales.

Jordan Essentials
Consultants for Jordan Essentials sell bath and body products by throwing at-home Girls-Night-In parties featuring spa products and mineral makeup. Three starter kits are available: $89 for the Basic Kit, $125 for the Deluxe Kit and $150 for the Deluxe Plus Minerals Kit. Based on the price, the kits come with a varying range of products including items such as exfoliant, moisturizers, powder and lipcolor in addition to a training DVD, catalogs, flip charts, order forms, invitations and a free three-month website to promote your new business. Consultants make 25 to 35 percent of total sales and 5 to 8 percent of the sales of the consultants they have recruited, all based on your team’s overall sales. Jordan Essentials also offers Fast Start Rewards during the first 90 days, in which consultants receive $50 to $100 cash bonuses for recruiting other new consultants. The company also offers continual cash incentives, product bonuses, trips and prizes for those who exceed their sales goals.

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Boats For Sale Newcastle – Yachts For Sale Lake Macquarie – Australian


#

Boats & Yachts For Sale in Newcastle and Lake Macquarie

NEW LISTINGS REQUIRED

SALES HAVE BEEN EXTREMELY GOOD THIS YEAR SO WE NEED LOTS OF NEW QUALITY STOCK! From trailer boats, yachts & motor cruisers to large yachts & motor cruisers. Get in contact with our sales representatives and let Australian Boat Brokers do all the work for you we make it simple ask us how?

New Listings Required!

Call us toll free on 1800 180 053

FAST, PROFESSIONAL and WELL CONNECTED WE MAKE IT SIMPLE ASK US HOW! INDUSTRY BEST EXPOSURE: Your boat will receive immediate online marketing exposure on all the big websites using the latest in electronic media such as

  • www.boatsales.com.au
  • www.boatpoint.com.au
  • www.tradingpost.com.au
  • www.boatsonline.com.au
  • www.boatsonsale.com.au
  • www.australianboatbrokers.com.au

We also include a high profile window display at our premium water front offices where we are the exclusive brokers to the Lake Macquarie Yacht Club & Marmong Point Marina.

SERVICES

Australian Boat Brokers offer many one stop comprehensive services. From our time tested brokerage, to valuations, insurance, boat management, detailing and antifouling. We are here to serve and develop long term customer relationships with all the valued customers that we deal with.

  • VALUATIONS
  • BROKERAGE
  • INSURANCE
  • BOAT MANAGEMENT
  • DETAILING
  • ANTIFOULING.

Call us toll free on 1800 180 053


Best Direct Selling Companies – Direct Selling Business for Women #business #supplies

#home party businesses

#

9 Best Direct Selling Companies

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

If you’d like to make some extra money by being a hostess extraordinaire, starting your own direct selling business can be a fun way to do it. Working for a direct selling company allows you to create a flexible schedule by hosting parties, shows or workshops, and take home a percentage of your sales or a percentage of the sales of people you sign up to be representatives. Keep in mind that to make a lot of money, you need to sell a lot, but if you’re looking to supplement a steady income, direct selling could be just what you’re looking for. And if it turns out direct selling isn’t for you, most companies including the nine listed here offer reimbursement or exchange programs to buy back unused materials at full price or part of the full price, depending on how long you have had the products. Read on to discover nine companies that might be worth your while.

The Pampered Chef
If you have a passion for cooking and kitchen essentials, The Pampered Chef helps you make money by hosting “cooking shows” where your guests can buy an array of kitchen products sold by the company. There are two available starter kits: the New Consultant Kit ($155), which includes 25 products as well as training, marketing and business materials; and the New Consultant Mini Kit ($80), which includes a smaller selection of products, in addition to training, marketing and business materials. As a consultant, you can earn 20 to 25 percent of your total sales for each “show,” and, by recruiting a team of consultants, you can earn an additional 1 percent of your sales and 1 percent of their total sales. Also, once a consultant has reached $15,000 in sales in their career, their commission rate is automatically increased by 2 percent on all levels.

Silpada Designs
Silpada Designs offers sterling silver jewelry, belts and watches that you sell as a hostess of an at-home “jewelry party.” The starter kit ($199) includes personalized business cards, a representative ID stamp, 50 Silpada Designs catalogs, a polishing cloth, a ring- and belt-sizer, and one of three jewelry packages to choose from. Each package includes three pieces of jewelry to display at your parties (a necklace, bracelet and earrings). In addition, hostesses receive a 50 percent discount off any jewelry you choose to buy for yourself, to wear or display. The kit includes information on how to become a successful representative, training CDs, monthly newsletters, a personalized MySilpada website, a home-show DVD and unlimited one-on-one training from a Silpada sales coach. Consultants earn 30 percent commission on every piece of jewelry sold, and if you recruit other consultants, you earn anywhere between 4 and 16 percent of their sales, based on your team’s total sales. As a bonus, during the first 100 days, consultants can earn up to $3,000 in free jewelry based on sales and recruiting activity.

Heritage Makers
Through Heritage Makers. hosts hold “home workshops” or “virtual workshops,” selling professionally bound cards, canvases, storybooks, posters, digital scrapbooks and photo gifts. Hosts can also schedule “Studio Demos,” in which clients are taught how to use the Heritage online software and can buy memberships to Club HM, the company’s publishing club, which consultants are encouraged to join. Club HM has three levels of monthly membership: $30, $50 and $100. As a member of the club, hosts receive free “publishing points,” which can be used to buy Heritage Makers products, with each point equaling $1. The $30 membership equals 40 points, $50 is 70 points and $100 is 120 points. You are also allowed to purchase “publishing points” at a wholesale discount of up to 34 percent off. The Consultant Signup Kit ($50) includes a starting guide, card sampler, order forms, brochures, catalogs, training DVD, personal website and virtual office, and an 8 x 8 storybook sample. Hosts can also sign up for an add-on Business Builder Kit for an additional $100, which includes additional workshop materials and supplies. Consultants make 10 to 30 percent of their total sales, 20 to 30 percent of the sales of those you’ve recruited and 1 to 5 percent of sales of the representatives recruited by your team, depending on individual and team sales.

Jordan Essentials
Consultants for Jordan Essentials sell bath and body products by throwing at-home Girls-Night-In parties featuring spa products and mineral makeup. Three starter kits are available: $89 for the Basic Kit, $125 for the Deluxe Kit and $150 for the Deluxe Plus Minerals Kit. Based on the price, the kits come with a varying range of products including items such as exfoliant, moisturizers, powder and lipcolor in addition to a training DVD, catalogs, flip charts, order forms, invitations and a free three-month website to promote your new business. Consultants make 25 to 35 percent of total sales and 5 to 8 percent of the sales of the consultants they have recruited, all based on your team’s overall sales. Jordan Essentials also offers Fast Start Rewards during the first 90 days, in which consultants receive $50 to $100 cash bonuses for recruiting other new consultants. The company also offers continual cash incentives, product bonuses, trips and prizes for those who exceed their sales goals.

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MLM News – Direct Selling Facts, Figures and News #business #consultant

#best home business

#

The average Top Earner in Direct Selling is earning approxiately $20,000 per month / $240,000 per year based on 8,000+ ranks and 500+ distributors are making $1+ million a year.

Below distributor earnings are based on our Confidential Top Earner Form . public sources, conventions, up and downline information and are estimated due to the dynamics in pay plans.

Business For Home collects top earners data since year 2007 and we publish on a daily basis important Direct Selling News .

Active distributors are using this website to introduce prospects into the world of Direct Selling and to show what is possible.

The ranks are updating every 30 minutes in real time. Below are the first 1,000 top earners,

If you want access to all 8,000 top earners please log a support ticket .

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

Search This Website (Fast)





7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #entrepreneurial #ideas

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

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Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





Selling Your Business #business #process #modeling

#selling a business

#

If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .





Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Selling a business #new #business

#selling business

#

smallbusiness.wa.gov.au

Selling a business

Selling a business will require planning to make sure you receive the best possible price.

You will need to understand your obligations before selling or closing your business .

Generally, selling a business involves the following steps:

Determining whether selling is the right option

Before deciding to sell check whether you:

  • really want to sell or if you just need a break from your business
  • have considered options such as bringing in outside management
  • have the support of family and friends
  • have considered if the market conditions are right for selling
  • will make enough money from the sale to support yourself until a new income source is secured
  • will be restricted from trading in a similar business once you have sold
  • fully understand the implications of selling, by consulting your financial adviser, accountant or lawyer.

Preparing your business for sale

Ideally, you will begin preparing for sale well before you put your business on the market.

This could include:

  • Making sure you document processes and policies, making it easier for the new buyer to operate the business.
  • Ensuring employees have documented job descriptions.
  • Obtaining written agreements from suppliers and review contracts to make sure they don’t expire during the sale.
  • Selling obsolete or slow moving stock.
  • Reviewing plant and equipment and selling anything not required.
  • Making sure premises are well presented.
  • Reviewing your lease agreement to ensure it doesn’t expire during the sale and includes provision to transfer the lease to a new owner.
  • Collecting outstanding debts and paying your creditors.
  • Obtaining audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years.
  • Reducing employee leave liabilities by encouraging them to take leave, if possible.

Potential buyers will want to undertake their own due diligence into your business. However, it is a good idea to prepare a buyer’s information pack outlining key information about the business and what is included in the sale.

As a general guide the pack should include:

  • confidentiality agreement
  • description of your business
  • customer or client profile
  • industry information including how your business performs against industry benchmarks
  • detailed list of business assets and their value – these may include documented procedures and systems, plant and equipment, stock, intellectual property, client list, lease information, employees’ skills and qualifications, key business relationships and contracts.
  • testimonials from suppliers and customers
  • audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years
  • offer and acceptance form
  • contract of sale.

Setting the right sale price

Determining the value of your business can be very difficult. You may want to obtain advice from your financial adviser, accountant or a registered business broker with experience in selling similar businesses.

TIP: Only a business broker licensed under the Real Estate and Business Agents Act 1978 is permitted to act as an agent for a business owner in the sale of their business in Western Australia.Generally businesses are valued using one of the following methods.

Return on investment (ROI)

This is the most common method for valuing a business. The following formula is used to calculate the selling price:

Sale price = (net annual profit x 100) ÷ ROI percentage

TIP: To find the ROI percentage for your industry talk to your accountant or contact us

Asset value

This method adds all the assets of the business together to determine its value. Assets may include stock, plant and equipment, property, vehicles, furniture, intellectual property, established client list and goodwill. The following formula is used to determine the asset value:

Sale price = assets of the business + goodwill

TIP: Valuing goodwill can be difficult, seek advice from your financial adviser or accountant.

Market value

This is most commonly used to value professional practices such as legal, veterinarian or insurance brokers. It is rarely used to value retail businesses.

The following formula is used to determine the market value:

Sale price = turnover x industry multiple

TIP: Make sure you have a good understanding of the current market and are aware of industry standards. Research the market for businesses similar to yours, compare prices and set a price that is competitive.

Making the sale

Selling your own business requires specific skills and resources; a licensed business broker or commercial real estate agent can assist you.

If you decide to sell your own business, here a few matters to consider:

Marketing

Use your immediate networks of competitors, clients, employees, friends and family to promote the sale of your business; you never know who could be interested.

Your accountant may have clients looking to buy an established business.

Advertise the sale of your business using:

  • websites dedicated to the sale of businesses
  • local, state or national newspapers
  • industry publications, trade journals, or specialist publications.

TIP: Use general terms to advertise your business and don’t disclose the business name.

Ensure potential buyers sign a confidentiality agreement

When selling a business it is common to receive applications from non genuine buyers. They could be competitors, suppliers, employees or clients trying to find out who is selling. Before giving your business information pack to potential buyers make sure they sign a confidentiality agreement first.

Negotiate the sale

Once a potential buyer has conducted due diligence, they may want to discuss terms before making a formal written offer. Prepare yourself for negotiation by considering:

  • What conditions do you want from the sale?
  • What are you prepared to compromise on?
  • At what point would you stop negotiating and walk away from the sale?

Finalise the sale

It is a good idea to involve a professional business broker, settlement agent or lawyer in the sale of your business. This will prevent problems and make sure the sale is valid.

A contract for sale of a business as a going concern should include all the details, and terms and conditions, negotiated and agreed with the buyer.

More information





Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

Kaeser & Blair business owners
discuss how to make extra money.

Kaeser & Blair is different. K
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//–>

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #business #management #salary

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

Loading the player.

Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





Best Direct Selling Companies – Direct Selling Business for Women #cool #business

#home party businesses

#

9 Best Direct Selling Companies

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If you’d like to make some extra money by being a hostess extraordinaire, starting your own direct selling business can be a fun way to do it. Working for a direct selling company allows you to create a flexible schedule by hosting parties, shows or workshops, and take home a percentage of your sales or a percentage of the sales of people you sign up to be representatives. Keep in mind that to make a lot of money, you need to sell a lot, but if you’re looking to supplement a steady income, direct selling could be just what you’re looking for. And if it turns out direct selling isn’t for you, most companies including the nine listed here offer reimbursement or exchange programs to buy back unused materials at full price or part of the full price, depending on how long you have had the products. Read on to discover nine companies that might be worth your while.

The Pampered Chef
If you have a passion for cooking and kitchen essentials, The Pampered Chef helps you make money by hosting “cooking shows” where your guests can buy an array of kitchen products sold by the company. There are two available starter kits: the New Consultant Kit ($155), which includes 25 products as well as training, marketing and business materials; and the New Consultant Mini Kit ($80), which includes a smaller selection of products, in addition to training, marketing and business materials. As a consultant, you can earn 20 to 25 percent of your total sales for each “show,” and, by recruiting a team of consultants, you can earn an additional 1 percent of your sales and 1 percent of their total sales. Also, once a consultant has reached $15,000 in sales in their career, their commission rate is automatically increased by 2 percent on all levels.

Silpada Designs
Silpada Designs offers sterling silver jewelry, belts and watches that you sell as a hostess of an at-home “jewelry party.” The starter kit ($199) includes personalized business cards, a representative ID stamp, 50 Silpada Designs catalogs, a polishing cloth, a ring- and belt-sizer, and one of three jewelry packages to choose from. Each package includes three pieces of jewelry to display at your parties (a necklace, bracelet and earrings). In addition, hostesses receive a 50 percent discount off any jewelry you choose to buy for yourself, to wear or display. The kit includes information on how to become a successful representative, training CDs, monthly newsletters, a personalized MySilpada website, a home-show DVD and unlimited one-on-one training from a Silpada sales coach. Consultants earn 30 percent commission on every piece of jewelry sold, and if you recruit other consultants, you earn anywhere between 4 and 16 percent of their sales, based on your team’s total sales. As a bonus, during the first 100 days, consultants can earn up to $3,000 in free jewelry based on sales and recruiting activity.

Heritage Makers
Through Heritage Makers. hosts hold “home workshops” or “virtual workshops,” selling professionally bound cards, canvases, storybooks, posters, digital scrapbooks and photo gifts. Hosts can also schedule “Studio Demos,” in which clients are taught how to use the Heritage online software and can buy memberships to Club HM, the company’s publishing club, which consultants are encouraged to join. Club HM has three levels of monthly membership: $30, $50 and $100. As a member of the club, hosts receive free “publishing points,” which can be used to buy Heritage Makers products, with each point equaling $1. The $30 membership equals 40 points, $50 is 70 points and $100 is 120 points. You are also allowed to purchase “publishing points” at a wholesale discount of up to 34 percent off. The Consultant Signup Kit ($50) includes a starting guide, card sampler, order forms, brochures, catalogs, training DVD, personal website and virtual office, and an 8 x 8 storybook sample. Hosts can also sign up for an add-on Business Builder Kit for an additional $100, which includes additional workshop materials and supplies. Consultants make 10 to 30 percent of their total sales, 20 to 30 percent of the sales of those you’ve recruited and 1 to 5 percent of sales of the representatives recruited by your team, depending on individual and team sales.

Jordan Essentials
Consultants for Jordan Essentials sell bath and body products by throwing at-home Girls-Night-In parties featuring spa products and mineral makeup. Three starter kits are available: $89 for the Basic Kit, $125 for the Deluxe Kit and $150 for the Deluxe Plus Minerals Kit. Based on the price, the kits come with a varying range of products including items such as exfoliant, moisturizers, powder and lipcolor in addition to a training DVD, catalogs, flip charts, order forms, invitations and a free three-month website to promote your new business. Consultants make 25 to 35 percent of total sales and 5 to 8 percent of the sales of the consultants they have recruited, all based on your team’s overall sales. Jordan Essentials also offers Fast Start Rewards during the first 90 days, in which consultants receive $50 to $100 cash bonuses for recruiting other new consultants. The company also offers continual cash incentives, product bonuses, trips and prizes for those who exceed their sales goals.

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Selling a business #green #business

#selling business

#

smallbusiness.wa.gov.au

Selling a business

Selling a business will require planning to make sure you receive the best possible price.

You will need to understand your obligations before selling or closing your business .

Generally, selling a business involves the following steps:

Determining whether selling is the right option

Before deciding to sell check whether you:

  • really want to sell or if you just need a break from your business
  • have considered options such as bringing in outside management
  • have the support of family and friends
  • have considered if the market conditions are right for selling
  • will make enough money from the sale to support yourself until a new income source is secured
  • will be restricted from trading in a similar business once you have sold
  • fully understand the implications of selling, by consulting your financial adviser, accountant or lawyer.

Preparing your business for sale

Ideally, you will begin preparing for sale well before you put your business on the market.

This could include:

  • Making sure you document processes and policies, making it easier for the new buyer to operate the business.
  • Ensuring employees have documented job descriptions.
  • Obtaining written agreements from suppliers and review contracts to make sure they don’t expire during the sale.
  • Selling obsolete or slow moving stock.
  • Reviewing plant and equipment and selling anything not required.
  • Making sure premises are well presented.
  • Reviewing your lease agreement to ensure it doesn’t expire during the sale and includes provision to transfer the lease to a new owner.
  • Collecting outstanding debts and paying your creditors.
  • Obtaining audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years.
  • Reducing employee leave liabilities by encouraging them to take leave, if possible.

Potential buyers will want to undertake their own due diligence into your business. However, it is a good idea to prepare a buyer’s information pack outlining key information about the business and what is included in the sale.

As a general guide the pack should include:

  • confidentiality agreement
  • description of your business
  • customer or client profile
  • industry information including how your business performs against industry benchmarks
  • detailed list of business assets and their value – these may include documented procedures and systems, plant and equipment, stock, intellectual property, client list, lease information, employees’ skills and qualifications, key business relationships and contracts.
  • testimonials from suppliers and customers
  • audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years
  • offer and acceptance form
  • contract of sale.

Setting the right sale price

Determining the value of your business can be very difficult. You may want to obtain advice from your financial adviser, accountant or a registered business broker with experience in selling similar businesses.

TIP: Only a business broker licensed under the Real Estate and Business Agents Act 1978 is permitted to act as an agent for a business owner in the sale of their business in Western Australia.Generally businesses are valued using one of the following methods.

Return on investment (ROI)

This is the most common method for valuing a business. The following formula is used to calculate the selling price:

Sale price = (net annual profit x 100) ÷ ROI percentage

TIP: To find the ROI percentage for your industry talk to your accountant or contact us

Asset value

This method adds all the assets of the business together to determine its value. Assets may include stock, plant and equipment, property, vehicles, furniture, intellectual property, established client list and goodwill. The following formula is used to determine the asset value:

Sale price = assets of the business + goodwill

TIP: Valuing goodwill can be difficult, seek advice from your financial adviser or accountant.

Market value

This is most commonly used to value professional practices such as legal, veterinarian or insurance brokers. It is rarely used to value retail businesses.

The following formula is used to determine the market value:

Sale price = turnover x industry multiple

TIP: Make sure you have a good understanding of the current market and are aware of industry standards. Research the market for businesses similar to yours, compare prices and set a price that is competitive.

Making the sale

Selling your own business requires specific skills and resources; a licensed business broker or commercial real estate agent can assist you.

If you decide to sell your own business, here a few matters to consider:

Marketing

Use your immediate networks of competitors, clients, employees, friends and family to promote the sale of your business; you never know who could be interested.

Your accountant may have clients looking to buy an established business.

Advertise the sale of your business using:

  • websites dedicated to the sale of businesses
  • local, state or national newspapers
  • industry publications, trade journals, or specialist publications.

TIP: Use general terms to advertise your business and don’t disclose the business name.

Ensure potential buyers sign a confidentiality agreement

When selling a business it is common to receive applications from non genuine buyers. They could be competitors, suppliers, employees or clients trying to find out who is selling. Before giving your business information pack to potential buyers make sure they sign a confidentiality agreement first.

Negotiate the sale

Once a potential buyer has conducted due diligence, they may want to discuss terms before making a formal written offer. Prepare yourself for negotiation by considering:

  • What conditions do you want from the sale?
  • What are you prepared to compromise on?
  • At what point would you stop negotiating and walk away from the sale?

Finalise the sale

It is a good idea to involve a professional business broker, settlement agent or lawyer in the sale of your business. This will prevent problems and make sure the sale is valid.

A contract for sale of a business as a going concern should include all the details, and terms and conditions, negotiated and agreed with the buyer.

More information





Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

Kaeser & Blair business owners
discuss how to make extra money.

Kaeser & Blair is different. K
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7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #business #economics

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

Loading the player.

Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





Selling a business #penny #stocks

#selling business

#

smallbusiness.wa.gov.au

Selling a business

Selling a business will require planning to make sure you receive the best possible price.

You will need to understand your obligations before selling or closing your business .

Generally, selling a business involves the following steps:

Determining whether selling is the right option

Before deciding to sell check whether you:

  • really want to sell or if you just need a break from your business
  • have considered options such as bringing in outside management
  • have the support of family and friends
  • have considered if the market conditions are right for selling
  • will make enough money from the sale to support yourself until a new income source is secured
  • will be restricted from trading in a similar business once you have sold
  • fully understand the implications of selling, by consulting your financial adviser, accountant or lawyer.

Preparing your business for sale

Ideally, you will begin preparing for sale well before you put your business on the market.

This could include:

  • Making sure you document processes and policies, making it easier for the new buyer to operate the business.
  • Ensuring employees have documented job descriptions.
  • Obtaining written agreements from suppliers and review contracts to make sure they don’t expire during the sale.
  • Selling obsolete or slow moving stock.
  • Reviewing plant and equipment and selling anything not required.
  • Making sure premises are well presented.
  • Reviewing your lease agreement to ensure it doesn’t expire during the sale and includes provision to transfer the lease to a new owner.
  • Collecting outstanding debts and paying your creditors.
  • Obtaining audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years.
  • Reducing employee leave liabilities by encouraging them to take leave, if possible.

Potential buyers will want to undertake their own due diligence into your business. However, it is a good idea to prepare a buyer’s information pack outlining key information about the business and what is included in the sale.

As a general guide the pack should include:

  • confidentiality agreement
  • description of your business
  • customer or client profile
  • industry information including how your business performs against industry benchmarks
  • detailed list of business assets and their value – these may include documented procedures and systems, plant and equipment, stock, intellectual property, client list, lease information, employees’ skills and qualifications, key business relationships and contracts.
  • testimonials from suppliers and customers
  • audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years
  • offer and acceptance form
  • contract of sale.

Setting the right sale price

Determining the value of your business can be very difficult. You may want to obtain advice from your financial adviser, accountant or a registered business broker with experience in selling similar businesses.

TIP: Only a business broker licensed under the Real Estate and Business Agents Act 1978 is permitted to act as an agent for a business owner in the sale of their business in Western Australia.Generally businesses are valued using one of the following methods.

Return on investment (ROI)

This is the most common method for valuing a business. The following formula is used to calculate the selling price:

Sale price = (net annual profit x 100) ÷ ROI percentage

TIP: To find the ROI percentage for your industry talk to your accountant or contact us

Asset value

This method adds all the assets of the business together to determine its value. Assets may include stock, plant and equipment, property, vehicles, furniture, intellectual property, established client list and goodwill. The following formula is used to determine the asset value:

Sale price = assets of the business + goodwill

TIP: Valuing goodwill can be difficult, seek advice from your financial adviser or accountant.

Market value

This is most commonly used to value professional practices such as legal, veterinarian or insurance brokers. It is rarely used to value retail businesses.

The following formula is used to determine the market value:

Sale price = turnover x industry multiple

TIP: Make sure you have a good understanding of the current market and are aware of industry standards. Research the market for businesses similar to yours, compare prices and set a price that is competitive.

Making the sale

Selling your own business requires specific skills and resources; a licensed business broker or commercial real estate agent can assist you.

If you decide to sell your own business, here a few matters to consider:

Marketing

Use your immediate networks of competitors, clients, employees, friends and family to promote the sale of your business; you never know who could be interested.

Your accountant may have clients looking to buy an established business.

Advertise the sale of your business using:

  • websites dedicated to the sale of businesses
  • local, state or national newspapers
  • industry publications, trade journals, or specialist publications.

TIP: Use general terms to advertise your business and don’t disclose the business name.

Ensure potential buyers sign a confidentiality agreement

When selling a business it is common to receive applications from non genuine buyers. They could be competitors, suppliers, employees or clients trying to find out who is selling. Before giving your business information pack to potential buyers make sure they sign a confidentiality agreement first.

Negotiate the sale

Once a potential buyer has conducted due diligence, they may want to discuss terms before making a formal written offer. Prepare yourself for negotiation by considering:

  • What conditions do you want from the sale?
  • What are you prepared to compromise on?
  • At what point would you stop negotiating and walk away from the sale?

Finalise the sale

It is a good idea to involve a professional business broker, settlement agent or lawyer in the sale of your business. This will prevent problems and make sure the sale is valid.

A contract for sale of a business as a going concern should include all the details, and terms and conditions, negotiated and agreed with the buyer.

More information





Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

Kaeser & Blair business owners
discuss how to make extra money.

Kaeser & Blair is different. K
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google_ad_slot = “6127977750”;
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10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #car #wash #business

#sell my business

#

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?





Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .