McNamara-O-Hara Service Contract Act (SCA) – Wage and Hour Division (WHD) –


#

Wage and Hour Division (WHD)

McNamara-O-Hara Service Contract Act (SCA)

The McNamara-O Hara Service Contract Act requires contractors and subcontractors performing services on prime contracts in excess of $2,500 to pay service employees in various classes no less than the wage rates and fringe benefits found prevailing in the locality, or the rates (including prospective increases) contained in a predecessor contractor’s collective bargaining agreement. The Department of Labor issues wage determinations on a contract-by-contract basis in response to specific requests from contracting agencies. These determinations are incorporated into the contract.

For contracts equal to or less than $2,500, contractors are required to pay the federal minimum wage as provided in Section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

For prime contracts in excess of $100,000, contractors and subcontractors must also, under the provisions of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, as amended, pay laborers and mechanics, including guards and watchmen, at least one and one-half times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek. The overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act may also apply to SCA-covered contracts.

The Wage and Hour Division has issued a final rule to implement Executive Order 13495, Nondisplacement of Qualified Workers Under Service Contracts. This final rule will be effective once the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council (FARC) issues regulations for the inclusion of the nondisplacement contract clause in covered Federal solicitations and contracts, as required by the Executive Order. For more information, please visit the Nondisplacement Final Rule Webpage. (August 29, 2011)

  • Fact Sheet 39 Outside Sales Employees Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (PDF)
    • Fact Sheet 17a ?>

Small Business Size Standards #business #loan

#sba loan requirements

#

Learn about the definition of – and qualifications for – a small business and why it’s important to know your status.

SBA has established numerical definitions of small businesses, or “size standards,” for all for-profit industries. Size standards represent the largest size that a business (including its subsidiaries and affiliates) may be to remain classified as a small business concern. In determining what constitutes a small business, the definition will vary to reflect industry differences. These size standards are used to determine eligibility for SBA’s financial assistance and to its other programs, as well as to Federal government procurement programs designed to help small businesses. Also, the Small Business Act states that unless specifically authorized by statute, no other Federal department or agency may prescribe a size standard for categorizing a business concern as a small business concern, unless such proposed size standard meets certain criteria and is approved by the Administrator of SBA.

Get updates on small business size standards news.

The Small Business Act was created, in part, to help small businesses compete in our economic market. The act has made it necessary to establish standards of identifying small businesses.

For its ongoing comprehensive size standards review and future regulatory actions relating to size standards, SBA has developed a “Size Standards Methodology White Paper”.

To help small business owners assess their small business status, SBA has established a Table of Small Business Size Standards.

Size guidelines define the maximum size that a firm (including its affiliates) can be to qualify as a small business for most SBA programs. Learn about the common standards for a small business.

Your business might be eligible for programs reserved for small business concerns. To qualify, your business must satisfy SBA’s definition of a business concern and small business size standards.

Learn about size protests, size determinations and appeals.

This guide can help you understand how SBA defines a small business and how it establishes its small business size standards.

When you calculate the size of your business, you must include the annual receipts and the employees of your affiliates. Learn more with these resources.

This training module describes what size standards are, how they are established, why they are important, how they are used, where to find them and how to determine if a specific business concern.

Get information about the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program.





Small Business Size Standards #business #broker

#sba loan requirements

#

Learn about the definition of – and qualifications for – a small business and why it’s important to know your status.

SBA has established numerical definitions of small businesses, or “size standards,” for all for-profit industries. Size standards represent the largest size that a business (including its subsidiaries and affiliates) may be to remain classified as a small business concern. In determining what constitutes a small business, the definition will vary to reflect industry differences. These size standards are used to determine eligibility for SBA’s financial assistance and to its other programs, as well as to Federal government procurement programs designed to help small businesses. Also, the Small Business Act states that unless specifically authorized by statute, no other Federal department or agency may prescribe a size standard for categorizing a business concern as a small business concern, unless such proposed size standard meets certain criteria and is approved by the Administrator of SBA.

Get updates on small business size standards news.

The Small Business Act was created, in part, to help small businesses compete in our economic market. The act has made it necessary to establish standards of identifying small businesses.

For its ongoing comprehensive size standards review and future regulatory actions relating to size standards, SBA has developed a “Size Standards Methodology White Paper”.

To help small business owners assess their small business status, SBA has established a Table of Small Business Size Standards.

Size guidelines define the maximum size that a firm (including its affiliates) can be to qualify as a small business for most SBA programs. Learn about the common standards for a small business.

Your business might be eligible for programs reserved for small business concerns. To qualify, your business must satisfy SBA’s definition of a business concern and small business size standards.

Learn about size protests, size determinations and appeals.

This guide can help you understand how SBA defines a small business and how it establishes its small business size standards.

When you calculate the size of your business, you must include the annual receipts and the employees of your affiliates. Learn more with these resources.

This training module describes what size standards are, how they are established, why they are important, how they are used, where to find them and how to determine if a specific business concern.

Get information about the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program.





Value-Added-Network (VAN) for Suppliers #suppliers #edi #value-added-network, #van #tier-1 #edi, #van #service


#

EDI Network Connectivity: Value-Added Network (VAN)

Looking to exchange business documents instantly and easily with your customers?
Let InterTrade help you connect with your trading partners.

An EDI Value-Added-Network (VAN) provides direct access to all partners in your supply chain and InterTrade is one of only a handful of TIER-1 EDI VAN service providers in North America. InterTrade is fully and securely interconnected to all other major VANs, enabling you to quickly connect your enterprise to your trading partners for efficient, real-time EDI exchanges integrated to your IT systems.

Benefits to Suppliers

EDI may seem complicated but in reality, it is a vehicle to standardize and simplify communications between trading partners. Retailers, suppliers, distributors, 3PLs, etc. all can benefit by exchanging important business documents on a secure network and in real-time. This translates into:

  • More accurate information – less manual intervention
  • Increased automation – less paper; more green
  • Improved visibility on B2B transactions
  • Closer business relationships
  • Shorter sales cycle
  • Faster orders-to-cash
  • More sales!

Small, medium and large businesses are turning to InterTrade for customizable network solutions that grant quick access to any trading partner at the most affordable price.

Simple and Affordable EDI VAN Solutions to Fit Your Needs

  • InterTrade s EDI solutions allow you to share POs, Invoices, ASNs, and other critical business documents electronically with your trading partners, regardless of their back-office applications and ERPs
  • InterTrade supports a wide array of communications options including FTP, AS2/AS3, HTTPS, VPN and our own ultra-secure proprietary security communications software (ecConnect)
  • Our state-of-the-art monitoring tool (ecView) provides real-time visibility on all documents shared between you and your business partners

Whether you have your own EDI software and IT staff or you want InterTrade to manage your entire document mapping, translation and transportation, our customizable solutions will ensure you fully meet your partner requirements, easily and quickly.

Contact our experts to discuss your EDI needs and find a solution that is right for you.

Fully Managed EDI Services (including analysis, mapping, translation and transportation)

InterTrade s Managed EDI Services drive results to your bottom line by enabling you to focus on your core competencies knowing that your electronic trading relationships are optimally managed.

InterTrade takes on the onus of implementing, operating, maintaining and optimizing the entire infrastructure and services needed to run your B2B electronic document exchanges so you can comply with your trading partner requirements without the expense of new hardware, software or specialized in-house EDI resources.

This full-service hosted EDI implementation includes:

  • Application file specifications analysis
  • EDI standards compliance
  • Connectivity implementation
  • Data transformation mappings creation
  • Customer testing
  • Trading partner testing
  • Continual monitoring and production

Fax to EDI

ecFax Fax-to-EDI capability provides an efficient and cost-effective way to trade electronically with your fax-ready business partners, regardless of their size. The Fax-to-EDI service automatically converts information from trading partners faxes into electronic data and then delivers this data ready for integration into your ERP or other enterprise applications. The result? Faxed documents can now be processed just like electronic ones.

Web-EDI

If you need an easy and cost-effective EDI solution that requires nothing but a computer and an internet connection, Web-EDI is your answer. Web-EDI allows you to become EDI-enabled to reach all of your retailers through a web browser. It is fast to implement, easy to use and requires no additional software. Our web-EDI service also enables carton label printing for your convenience.

AS2 Brokerage

Let InterTrade handle your complex communications connectivity to your trading partners. Whether they require AS2, AS3, FTPS, etc. InterTrade provides the connectivity so you can do what you do best – focus on your core business.

Discuss your EDI needs with our experts for personalized professional service.


Small Business Size Standards #business #environment

#sba loan requirements

#

Learn about the definition of – and qualifications for – a small business and why it’s important to know your status.

SBA has established numerical definitions of small businesses, or “size standards,” for all for-profit industries. Size standards represent the largest size that a business (including its subsidiaries and affiliates) may be to remain classified as a small business concern. In determining what constitutes a small business, the definition will vary to reflect industry differences. These size standards are used to determine eligibility for SBA’s financial assistance and to its other programs, as well as to Federal government procurement programs designed to help small businesses. Also, the Small Business Act states that unless specifically authorized by statute, no other Federal department or agency may prescribe a size standard for categorizing a business concern as a small business concern, unless such proposed size standard meets certain criteria and is approved by the Administrator of SBA.

Get updates on small business size standards news.

The Small Business Act was created, in part, to help small businesses compete in our economic market. The act has made it necessary to establish standards of identifying small businesses.

For its ongoing comprehensive size standards review and future regulatory actions relating to size standards, SBA has developed a “Size Standards Methodology White Paper”.

To help small business owners assess their small business status, SBA has established a Table of Small Business Size Standards.

Size guidelines define the maximum size that a firm (including its affiliates) can be to qualify as a small business for most SBA programs. Learn about the common standards for a small business.

Your business might be eligible for programs reserved for small business concerns. To qualify, your business must satisfy SBA’s definition of a business concern and small business size standards.

Learn about size protests, size determinations and appeals.

This guide can help you understand how SBA defines a small business and how it establishes its small business size standards.

When you calculate the size of your business, you must include the annual receipts and the employees of your affiliates. Learn more with these resources.

This training module describes what size standards are, how they are established, why they are important, how they are used, where to find them and how to determine if a specific business concern.

Get information about the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program.





Small Business Size Standards #business #administration #degree

#sba loan requirements

#

Learn about the definition of – and qualifications for – a small business and why it’s important to know your status.

SBA has established numerical definitions of small businesses, or “size standards,” for all for-profit industries. Size standards represent the largest size that a business (including its subsidiaries and affiliates) may be to remain classified as a small business concern. In determining what constitutes a small business, the definition will vary to reflect industry differences. These size standards are used to determine eligibility for SBA’s financial assistance and to its other programs, as well as to Federal government procurement programs designed to help small businesses. Also, the Small Business Act states that unless specifically authorized by statute, no other Federal department or agency may prescribe a size standard for categorizing a business concern as a small business concern, unless such proposed size standard meets certain criteria and is approved by the Administrator of SBA.

Get updates on small business size standards news.

The Small Business Act was created, in part, to help small businesses compete in our economic market. The act has made it necessary to establish standards of identifying small businesses.

For its ongoing comprehensive size standards review and future regulatory actions relating to size standards, SBA has developed a “Size Standards Methodology White Paper”.

To help small business owners assess their small business status, SBA has established a Table of Small Business Size Standards.

Size guidelines define the maximum size that a firm (including its affiliates) can be to qualify as a small business for most SBA programs. Learn about the common standards for a small business.

Your business might be eligible for programs reserved for small business concerns. To qualify, your business must satisfy SBA’s definition of a business concern and small business size standards.

Learn about size protests, size determinations and appeals.

This guide can help you understand how SBA defines a small business and how it establishes its small business size standards.

When you calculate the size of your business, you must include the annual receipts and the employees of your affiliates. Learn more with these resources.

This training module describes what size standards are, how they are established, why they are important, how they are used, where to find them and how to determine if a specific business concern.

Get information about the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program.