How to Apply for Women and Minority Owned Business Grants, business grants

How to Apply for Women and Minority Owned Business Grants

Business grants for women

Asian business woman image by huaxiadragon from Fotolia.com

Related Articles

  • 1 Grants for Minority First Time Business Owners
  • 2 List of Grants for African-American Women to Start a Business
  • 3 Grants for Minority Women Wanting to Start a Small Business
  • 4 How to Register a Business As Minority Owned

Women and visible minorities who own their own businesses may be eligible for a variety of grants. Learn how to find them and apply for them.

Women and visible minorities can take advantage of grants offered by private institutions and, less often, government agencies. The key to winning a grant is ensuring that your business goals are aligned with the purpose of the grant and that you submit a professional application. With a bit of study and practice, however, you can gain confidence and hone your grant-writing skills, allowing you to tap into the resources of organizations that promote female and minority entrepreneurship.

Select specific grant programs that match your business and personal situation. Take note of each granting organization’s name and contact information, and compile a list of all grants for which you are eligible. Select a range of options – grants for women only, minorities only or both – if you are both a woman and a part of a minority group; this will give you a wider range of possibilities. Begin your search at Grants.gov for federal funding, and SRA International or Business Owners’ Idea Cafe for private funding sources (see Resources).

Research the granting organization thoroughly. Visit its website and read any news articles or press releases related to the organization. Look into the types of organizations and projects that the organization funds, and research specific grant-winners, if possible. Focus on the exact purpose of the awarded grants. Grants may be awarded purely to promote female and minority entrepreneurship, for example, or they may be granted to organizations whose programs directly benefit women and minorities in general.

Contact the granting organization and ask for guidance in preparing your grant proposal. Ask a representative to speak with you about the grant proposal process, explaining such things as preferred submission formats and length, the organization’s specific areas of interest and any other grant opportunities for women and minorities that may be available. Keep your new contact’s name and information as you did with the notes you took in step one.

Create your grant proposal. The proposal should include a description of your organization, including its mission and product offerings, and a needs assessment that clearly explains the need your company serves. Focus specifically on how your organization will promote the goals of the organization that offers the grant.

Create a thorough description of your products, services and business model, and include it in your grant proposal. Add a budget, projected financial statements and a detailed summary of how you plan to spend the grant money. End the proposal with professional biographies of yourself and your top-management team. List the names of any women or minority associations or groups of which you are a member.

Create an executive summary after all other sections are done and place it at the beginning of the grant proposal document.

Submit your grant proposal to your contact or designated recipient in the granting organization. Follow all format and submission instructions when sending in your proposal, and include a brief cover letter introducing yourself and your company, while thanking the grant reviewers for their time.

Ask your contact in the granting organization if members of the grant proposal review committee would be willing to look over your proposal and provide feedback before the submission deadline. It never hurts to ask, and this could provide invaluable insight and increase your chances of receiving a grant.





British Small Business Grants, Helping small businesses grow, business grants for women.#Business

A monthly cash competition for the UK’s brightest small business stars

Business grants for women

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Sponsored by

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Business grants for women

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About the grant

As the leading advice website in the small business space, SmallBusiness.co.uk receives many requests every month from would-be entrepreneurs and existing company owners asking what financial assistance is available to help them, start, run, grow and succeed.

Whether you are running a cafe, operating a business from home, or perhaps managing a franchise, you will need funds to establish and grow your company. Depending on the type of business, this requirement may vary from a few hundred pounds to multiple thousands.

While some companies may be able to get away with minimal investment in equipment, staff and marketing, others will be faced with significant expenditures that are key to establishing their company.

The Small Business Grants initiative will help small businesses in this area, offering monthly financial assistance to maximise their chance of success.

Every month, one business deemed by our panel of judges to be the most deserving will benefit from a £5,000 financial grant, as well as being featured on SmallBusiness.co.uk as a monthly winner.

We look forward to receiving your applications for this exciting initiative. Good luck!





Getting Grants For Business Startups – A Complete Guide – Government Grants

Getting Grants For Business Startups A Complete Guide

Starting a business requires seed money for start-up costs, equipment purchases and materials, rental of office or building space or purchase of land, business fees, salaries and other operating costs. Business expansion also requires on-going funds. Raising capital is hard these days because banks have tight lending requirements, venture capitalist money is harder to find and many entrepreneurs are having to use their own personal savings funds or ask friends or relatives to invest. What many business owners are not aware of is that there are millions of dollars available in business start-up grants from the federal, state, municipal and private organizations and corporations that can be used for start-up capital purposes. The government alone has 26 federal agencies that deal with grant opportunities. Programs offer funds for business start-up, consultation, business expansion, research, development and small loans so that businesses of all types and sizes can compete. The government recognizes the value of new business start-ups wants to give grants to start a business to a variety of businesses.

The Department of Agriculture sponsors grants through the Broadband Initiatives Program which helps companies build broadband infrastructures in rural areas with less than 20,000 residences. Private businesses, excluding sole proprietorships, partnerships and limited liability companies, are eligible for this type of grant by applying to the Broadband Initiatives Program, Rural Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 1599, Washington, D.C. 20250 or calling them at 202-690-0525. For more information, grantees can go to the broadbandusa.gov website.

The Department of Health and Human Services sponsors grants for research regarding vision loss in the United States. Grants can be used for research, travel expenses, consultation fees, patient costs, supplies, materials, salaries and facility renovations. Small businesses and for profit companies are also eligible to apply for this grant by writing to Grants Management Branch, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services

Room 1300,5635 Fishers Lane, Bethesda, MD 20892-1900, or calling them at 301-451-2020 or visiting their website at nei.nih.gov.

The Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency provides grants for businesses regarding research and development of science and technology products and services that promote homeland security. The funds may be used to test, develop, and use of technologies to solve homeland security vulnerabilities. Eligible applicants include private entities, businesses, individuals, groups and for-profit organization. For more information, grantees can apply to the Grants and Financial Assistance Division, Office of Procurement Operations, Department of Homeland Security, Building 410, 245 Murray Lane SW, Washington, District of Columbia 20528, or call them at 202-447-5589 or visit their website at dhs.gov.

Small Business Administration

The Small Business Administration provides grants and loans for businesses for research, development, job training and technology. Grants and loans are also available to minorities such as women, African Americans and Hispanic Americans. For more information, applicants can visit the Small business Administration website.

States and Municipalities

States and local municipalities get grant money from the federal government and then give it to local and regional businesses for various start-up costs, business expansion, job training and technology to compete with other larger businesses and to develop new ideas and technology.

Private organizations and corporations also provide grant monies that they receive from government grants or private donors to enable businesses to do research and development, provide jobs and training.

Grant money is free and does not have to be repaid to the funder like loans do. However, there may be requirements that the grantee must meet, and the grantee may be subject to reporting requirements as well. Business start-up grants provide the needed funds for businesses to grow and expand and for new businesses to start so that jobs can be created and new technologies and services developed that provide benefits to the entire community and the country.





British Small Business Grants, Helping small businesses grow, women business grants.#Women #business

A monthly cash competition for the UK’s brightest small business stars

Women business grants

Women business grants

Sponsored by

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Supported by

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

Women business grants

About the grant

As the leading advice website in the small business space, SmallBusiness.co.uk receives many requests every month from would-be entrepreneurs and existing company owners asking what financial assistance is available to help them, start, run, grow and succeed.

Whether you are running a cafe, operating a business from home, or perhaps managing a franchise, you will need funds to establish and grow your company. Depending on the type of business, this requirement may vary from a few hundred pounds to multiple thousands.

While some companies may be able to get away with minimal investment in equipment, staff and marketing, others will be faced with significant expenditures that are key to establishing their company.

The Small Business Grants initiative will help small businesses in this area, offering monthly financial assistance to maximise their chance of success.

Every month, one business deemed by our panel of judges to be the most deserving will benefit from a £5,000 financial grant, as well as being featured on SmallBusiness.co.uk as a monthly winner.

We look forward to receiving your applications for this exciting initiative. Good luck!





Small Business Grants – How and Where To Apply, small business grants

Small Business Grants – How to Find Them and How to Qualify

Small business grants for womenSmall business grants are financial assistance programs available to entrepreneurs and business owners in the United States who have fewer than 500 employees. The funding can come from a government agency, a non-profit organization, or another for-profit company. Awards typically range from $500 to up to $100,000.

Eligibility varies, and can depend on your location, your income, your ethnicity, your gender, your experience in business, as well as your longetivity in business. Some small business grants can even require that you participate in a competition or write an essay to demonstrate your talents or need.

Here are 5 great ways to find what opportunities are available to you:

1) Check With Your Local Government Agencies. Many cities, counties, and states give away money to local businesses. Why? Because they want you to create jobs and more tax revenue. Many times they won’t highly publicize these opportunities, but it’s in your best interest to give them a call and/or search their web sites.

2) Check With Federal Government Agencies. The federal government doesn’t give grants directly to businesses, but they do give money to foundations who in turn can give money to small businesses. The federal agency in charge of this is the Grants Program Management Office, and all of their opportunities are listed publicly online.

3) Check With Major Corporations. Nearly every major corporation in this country has a foundation that gives away grants to enhance communities, and many of these are grants to start or expand a business. Start by checking first with big companies that are headquarted in our city or state.

4) Search The Internet. Use Google, Yahoo and Bing to conduct a search using the term business grants . You can even throw in the name of your city, county, state, etc. Carefully review the results, and look for web sites that other web sites are linked to. Doing so, will help you to find opportunities that may be casually listed on a blog or some type of directory. You may even come across a recent news article about a new opportunity.

5) Ask Around. When attending professional networking functions and social mixers, never hesitate to ask people that you meet about new opportunities. Many times, small business grants are given away to people who happen to be in the right place at the right time. Never underestimate the importance of creating a relationship with a power player and his/her associates.

6) Visit Your Local Library. Contrary to popular belief, libraries are still an excellent resource and store a lot of information that is not accessible in other places. Go to your library as soon possible; look for grant books and directories and ask specific questions to your librarian. You’ll be surprised what you can find.

#1 – Caleb Brown Community Business Grant Program

Provides access to “seed money” and grants to assist urban professionals with starting businesses and rebuilding the community.

#2 – DOT Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program

Offers grant funding to provide training and other services to minority-owned and women-owned businesses to help them compete for highway contracts.

Allows business owners and entrepreneurs to register and submit their business story and photos, get voted for, and be considered among the top 100 finalists and the winners.

Allows fans, including customers, vendors, employees, and the community, determine who deserves some love – in the form of financial assistance for their business.

#5 – Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) Business Grants

Every year, the MBDA organizes various angel investors with the primary objective of supporting minority businesses with mezzanine and second round financing.

#6 – Miller Lite Tap the FutureВ® Business Plan Competition

Annual competition for minority entrepreneurs that gives away business grants to applicants who submit the best business plans. (Formally called MillerCoors Urban Entrepreneur Series).

#7 – National Association For The Self-Employed (NASE) Growth Grants

Business owners can apply for a $5,000 grant useful for financing a particular small business need.

#8 – Rural Business Enterprise Grants (RBEG) Program

P rovides grants to finance the development of small and emerging businesses in rural areas, to be used for land acquisition, etc.

The SBA and it’s various initiatives award $2 billion in grant funding and loans to small high-tech businesses annually.

#10 – Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants

The SBA and it’s various initiatives award $2 billion in grant funding and loans to small high-tech businesses annually.

Provides veterans who own franchises with financial grants for business development, education, training, and/or technical assistance.

Provides technical assistance to women entrepreneurs, both new and established, in the areas of finance, management, and marketing, and other areas.





Grants For Women, Government Grant, small business grants for women.#Small #business #grants

Grants For Women

Women have had a constant struggle for equality and have made tremendous strides. Yet many still have lower paying jobs and suffer from discrimination in the workplace. In fact, 75% of women make less money than their male counterparts, when fulfilling the same job. Government grants for women are designed to help lessen this inequality and give women opportunity through finances.

Grants are given to women in order to:

  • Pursue college and/or higher education
  • Start a new business
  • Expand or update and existing business
  • Subsidize a low income household
  • Subsidize personal or family need

Small Business Grants for Women

Small business grants for women

If you re looking to start a new business, fund a nonprofit or further your educational research, there are plenty of grants created just for women that can assist you in pursuing your goals

Now more than ever women are receiving grants and starting up their own company or becoming a force to reckon with in their industry. In fact, according to the statistics of recent years, women make up nearly half of the population of new business owners each year; and are more likely to succeed in their venture than their male counterparts. How is that for incentive? If the only thing that has been holding you back has been money, than a grant is just what you need.

Business grants for women may focus on specific aspects of the corporate world like entrepreneurship or women-owned businesses. The U.S. Small Business Association provides incentives to help women business owners. Some organizations recognize leaders in their fields or individuals who contribute to the advancement of women in a profession like the Individual Awards from the Society of Women Engineers. There are also several non-profit organizations award grants to help women help themselves.

Below are some examples of grants available to women:

Mott Foundation Grant

This grant from the Mott Foundation is for women who want to enhance their education for the purpose of being more effective in the democratic community. Women who want to be involved in both governmental and non-governmental organizations can apply for this grant, as can women who want to start a nonprofit organization.

Women who want to start a water conservation program or an initiative to preserve the environment in their area are also eligible for the Mott Foundation Grant, as are women who seek to improve the educational systems in their cities or states.

If you re looking to start a new business, fund a nonprofit or further your educational research, there are plenty of grants created just for women that can assist you in pursuing your goals[/caption]

Applicants must submit a letter or intent and formal proposal for this grant; the amount of the grant varies.

Levi Strauss Foundation Grant

The Levi Strauss Grant for women awards funds to those who are dedicated to promoting worker s rights. Women who are committed to educating their communities about the prevention of HIV/AIDS are also eligible to receive the Levi Strauss Grant. Women around the world are able to apply for the grant. Depending on the purpose of the grant, women can be awarded anywhere between $250 and $458,667.

Global Fund for Women

A grant from the Global Fund for Women helps to advance the efforts of promoting human rights for girls and women. The grant is designed for women who are running human rights or community advancement organizations outside of the U.S., and the application is offered in five languages: English, French, Spanish, Russian and Arabic.

Grants from the Global Fund for Women are between $500 and $30,000. Detailed proposal letters and applications are due between September 15 and December 15, or between March 15 and June 30. Applicants are notified of their award by May 31 or November 30.

The Amber Grant

The Amber Grant is a small grant of $500-$1000 that is awarded to women starting up their own business. The money is intended for use in essential start-up costs.

The Women s Financial Fund Grant Program

The Women s Financial Fund Grant Program gives money to new and existing businesses owned by women. New businesses can receive from $100-$500 for start-up costs, and existing businesses could be eligible for $1,000 to $5,000.

College Grants for Women

Before 1975, more men attended college than women. Today, approximately 25 percent more women attend college than men. Despite increased enrollment, women are still underrepresented in several fields including engineering, computer science and the physical sciences. College-educated women in the workforce earn approximately 75 percent as much as their male counterparts. Minority women fill more lower-paying occupations. Less than 15 percent of women are in management and business and only 7 percent are in higher-paying fields like engineering and computer science. Minority women are least represented in these fields. To help close the gaps between men and women in the workforce the government, non-profit and corporate institutions have set aside grants and awards for women.

If you are a woman in college visit our page about college grants for women.

If you are a woman seeking graduate grants visit our page on graduate grants for women.

Small business grants for women

Get A Free Grant Assistance KitSmall business grants for women

To start your application for a free grant package go to:

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Your gift will help a woman in need rebuild her life and spread the goodwill of the season to your loved ones.

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My name is Regina

Since joining Women for Women International, Regina has been working to improve the health of those in her community.

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My Name Is Awham

Awham remembers the year the war started in Iraq, and the additional hardships she faced after her husband fell ill and lost his job. “I was left to care for my four children with no income.

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I am 38 years old. There was no happiness in my childhood. When I was six years old, my brother lost a dog-fighting match and started fighting with my cousin which led to my cousin’s death.

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I’m 39 years old. I’m married and I have two children of my own, a son and a daughter. And I have adopted five more children, because of the genocide.





Healthcare business news, research, data and events from Modern Healthcare, women in

Modern Healthcare

The leader in healthcare business news, research data

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Unsure of CMS’ strategy, providers may retreat on risk models

Providers fear that the CMS is sending mixed messages on regulatory relief on the shift to value-based care.

ONC seeks comments on Interoperability Standards Advisory

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Redesigning hospitals with patient experience in mind

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Research

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Women in business

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Data Points: Is it time to talk?

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Providers

HCA’s East Houston Regional Medical Center unable to weather the storm

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Insurance

HealthCare.gov numbers outpaced 2016 during first week of open enrollment

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Government

Feds backing out of lawsuit against HCR ManorCare

Women in business

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Finance

CHI cuts quarterly operating loss by more than half

Women in business

Catholic Health Initiatives reported improved financial results in the quarter ended Sept. 30, and officials say the health system is making progress with a turnaround.

Technology

DEA cracking down on fake fentanyl traffickers

Women in business

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Transformation

Using avatars to practice hard conversations

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Safety & Quality

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How to Apply for Women and Minority Owned Business Grants, business grants

How to Apply for Women and Minority Owned Business Grants

Business grants for women

Asian business woman image by huaxiadragon from Fotolia.com

Related Articles

  • 1 Grants for Minority First Time Business Owners
  • 2 List of Grants for African-American Women to Start a Business
  • 3 Grants for Minority Women Wanting to Start a Small Business
  • 4 How to Register a Business As Minority Owned

Women and visible minorities who own their own businesses may be eligible for a variety of grants. Learn how to find them and apply for them.

Women and visible minorities can take advantage of grants offered by private institutions and, less often, government agencies. The key to winning a grant is ensuring that your business goals are aligned with the purpose of the grant and that you submit a professional application. With a bit of study and practice, however, you can gain confidence and hone your grant-writing skills, allowing you to tap into the resources of organizations that promote female and minority entrepreneurship.

Select specific grant programs that match your business and personal situation. Take note of each granting organization’s name and contact information, and compile a list of all grants for which you are eligible. Select a range of options – grants for women only, minorities only or both – if you are both a woman and a part of a minority group; this will give you a wider range of possibilities. Begin your search at Grants.gov for federal funding, and SRA International or Business Owners’ Idea Cafe for private funding sources (see Resources).

Research the granting organization thoroughly. Visit its website and read any news articles or press releases related to the organization. Look into the types of organizations and projects that the organization funds, and research specific grant-winners, if possible. Focus on the exact purpose of the awarded grants. Grants may be awarded purely to promote female and minority entrepreneurship, for example, or they may be granted to organizations whose programs directly benefit women and minorities in general.

Contact the granting organization and ask for guidance in preparing your grant proposal. Ask a representative to speak with you about the grant proposal process, explaining such things as preferred submission formats and length, the organization’s specific areas of interest and any other grant opportunities for women and minorities that may be available. Keep your new contact’s name and information as you did with the notes you took in step one.

Create your grant proposal. The proposal should include a description of your organization, including its mission and product offerings, and a needs assessment that clearly explains the need your company serves. Focus specifically on how your organization will promote the goals of the organization that offers the grant.

Create a thorough description of your products, services and business model, and include it in your grant proposal. Add a budget, projected financial statements and a detailed summary of how you plan to spend the grant money. End the proposal with professional biographies of yourself and your top-management team. List the names of any women or minority associations or groups of which you are a member.

Create an executive summary after all other sections are done and place it at the beginning of the grant proposal document.

Submit your grant proposal to your contact or designated recipient in the granting organization. Follow all format and submission instructions when sending in your proposal, and include a brief cover letter introducing yourself and your company, while thanking the grant reviewers for their time.

Ask your contact in the granting organization if members of the grant proposal review committee would be willing to look over your proposal and provide feedback before the submission deadline. It never hurts to ask, and this could provide invaluable insight and increase your chances of receiving a grant.





Free Grants for Women, women business grants.#Women #business #grants

Free Grants for Women

Click here to go directly to our list of over 80 grants for women.

On this site you will find all the FREE information you need to successfully find, apply for and receive grants for women which you need to fulfill your dream.

Women business grants

The struggle for women to gain acceptance, recognition and respect in society has been a long and lengthy process that has only begun to be appreciated in the last century.

Whether you want to:

  • further your education
  • set up a company
  • expand or restructure an existing firm
  • implement new business ideas
  • commercialize patents
  • develop other activities

apart from know-how, motivation and all the qualities that make a successful businesswoman, you especially need FINANCING.

Example Projects

  • Money for Startup and/or Existing Businesses
  • College Grants and Scholarships
  • Dissertations
  • Equipment
  • Exhibitions
  • Federal Contracts
  • Major Expansions of Existing Programs
  • Research
  • Seed Money
  • Services
  • Special One-Time Expense
  • Training for A New Career
  • Travel
  • Publications – Support for the publication of documents that explore the lives and actions of important figures and/or bring to light major themes of United States history
  • Digitization projects (projects to convert records originally created in hardcopy or analog formats to electronic form) particularly for the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

How to Search For Grants on The World Wide Web

There are numerous resources on grants, scholarships, fellowships, loans and internships available through the World Wide Web specifically for women. You don’t want get lost in the masses.

Before you start your search determine your funding needs. A proposal or project outline can be the first step in creating a grant search strategy, since it will help you expand or limit your search.

First, determine the type of grant you need. If you want to find women’s small business grants for opening a co-operative arts gallery, for example, you can search for

  • women arts grants
  • women coop art grants
  • women regional arts grants
  • women businesses grants
  • women minorities businesses grants

Make a subject list – complete with synonyms and alternate word-endings – which will save an inordinate amount of time.

Examples of search words:

  • Women’s Funds .. or .. Grants for Women .. or .. Money for Women
  • Research Grants
  • Grants for Women in Science
  • US Grants
  • Education Grants
  • Grant Money
  • Small Business Grants
  • Technology Grants

Ignore Sites That Make You Pay

IMPORTANT NOTE: Sometimes you will find that the first few web sites that display as a result of your search will want you to pay for this information. You do not need to pay! You can find them yourself. Just ignore those profit-hungry mongrels and page past them.





Chase Offers $150, 000 In Small Business Grants, small business grants for

Chase Offers $150,000 In Small Business Grants

Grow your small business with a grant and marketing guidance from Chase and Google

Small business grants for women

Chase continues its ongoing commitment to to provide $3 million to local small businesses through its Mission Main Street Grants, a program that will award 20 grants of $150,000 to small businesses nationwide this year. Qualifying businesses will gain access to a marketing Toolkit from Google, a program sponsor.

The chosen 20 grant winners will receive a trip to Google for an exclusive small business marketing workshop, a Google Chromebook Laptop computer and a $2,000 coupon toward one market research study with Google Consumer Surveys (Opens Overlay).

Last year Samuel Gilmore was the recipient of a $200,000 Mission Main Street grant. It was 25 years ago that the former Air Force pilot founded Overnight Success Inc., a construction and supply company, in response to the high unemployment rate among African Americans in his hometown of Miami..Launched in 2012, the program has received $3 million from Chase and Google to help 20 small businesses in 2015.

The former flier of B-52 bombers took $17,000 from his savings to jump-start the business. His first projects consisted of simple jobs such as drywall painting and putting up concrete blocks. But his company went on to win contract bids on major construction projects such as the Miami International Airport, American Airlines Arena, and other commercial developments in the Miami area, and in 2013 Overnight Success grossed $1.4 million in revenues last year. “My contracting firm has hired more than 500 people, paying these workers $15 million in payroll,” says Gilmore, the company’s president and CE

Entrepreneurs from across the country applied in 2014 for the chance to win a Mission Main Street grant and a trip to Google headquarters. After completing the five-question application, entrants had to use social media to get at least 250 votes for their business in order to move up to the next round—in which they could be selected as a grant recipient by a panel of judges.

“The Internet has proven to be a vital pipeline for small businesses, and it continues to connect more businesses to their customers every day,” Jon Kaplan, Google s vice president of U.S. sales and operations, said in a statement

Out of nearly 35,000 applicants, Overnight Success made the cut and was selected as one of 12 small businesses to receive a $250,000 grant. Gilmore used the grant money to buy equipment to compete for contracts such as the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department’s $4.5 billion expansion project. With additional funds to help provide more employment opportunities in his community, Gilmore says winning the grant has allowed him to reassess the direction of his company and to evaluate the jobs that have benefited it the most.

In the beginning stages of a small business, Gilmore says, it’s easy for companies to get stuck on a treadmill, taking on jobs that may not always be the most beneficial, because of the need for steady cash flow. But with the help of the Mission Main Street Grants program, Overnight Success can now be more selective about the jobs it takes on.

In this year s contest, the grants are smaller but going to more businesses, 20 versus 12. The winners will be announced early in the year.

The Mission Main Street Grant is among the various corporate-sponsored entrepreneurship programs and non-traditional sources of capital that will be discussed at the 2015 Black Enterprise Entrepreneurs Summit (May 13–16 at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta), which marks its 20th year assisting startup and established entrepreneurs. The summit is a pivotal venue for small business owners to broker deals with key stakeholders, and to participate in sessions that cover topics such as accessing capital, accelerating tech startups, winning corporate and government contracts, and making value-added industry peer connections.





Women, Business and the Law – World Bank Group – Promote Gender

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